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Phillip Krzeminski

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  • 1
  • helpful vote
  • 41
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  • Fulgrim

  • The Horus Heresy, Book 5
  • By: Graham McNeill
  • Narrated by: David Timson
  • Length: 15 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 797
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 742
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 743

Under the command of the newly appointed Warmaster Horus, the Great Crusade continues. Fulgrim, Primarch of the Emperor's Children, leads his warriors into battle against a vile alien foe, unaware of the darker forces that have already set their sights upon the Imperium of Man. Loyalties are tested and every murderous whim indulged as the Emperor's Children take their first steps down the road to true corruption - a road that will ultimately lead them to the killing fields of Isstvan V....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Not my favorite, but maybe the best of the Horus Heresy.

  • By Erik Rose on 01-07-18

McNeill is the weakest of the series authors

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-09-18

Though I’m glad there wasn’t yet another reprise of the Istivan III battle, the first third of the book was a real crawl. I didn’t really feel connected to any of the characters this time around, as there was no real protagonist. The fall of Fulgrim was certainly more thought out and tragic than Horus’...this is definitely guilty of the “every warrior is more perfect and beautiful than the last” descriptors of the series. When everyone is perfect/grand then no one is.

  • The Flight of The Eisenstein

  • The Horus Heresy, Book 4
  • By: James Swallow
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Keeble
  • Length: 12 hrs and 15 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 1,098
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,019
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 1,020

Having witnessed the terrible massacre of Imperial forces on Isstvan III, Death Guard Captain Garro seizes a ship and sets a course for Terra to warn the Emperor of Horus' treachery. But when the fleeing Eisenstein is damaged by enemy fire, it becomes stranded in the warp - the realm of the Dark Powers. Can Garro and his men survive the depredations of Chaos and get his warning to the Emperor before Horus' plans reach fruition?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great continuation of the Horus Heresy

  • By Daniel Clifford on 04-15-18

A lot of repetition

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-31-18

The performance by Keeble was excellent, but the first 1/3 of the book is essentially a repeat of the last novel from a SLIGHTLY different perspective. The originality content was engaging enough, especially the descriptions of the creatures of the warp, though I felt like Garro was essentially cut from the same cloth as Loken, with the only real difference being his embrace of the emperor’s divinity.

  • False Gods

  • The Horus Heresy, Book 2
  • By: Graham McNeill
  • Narrated by: Toby Longworth
  • Length: 11 hrs and 18 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 1,443
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 1,334
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,327

The Great Crusade that has taken humanity into the stars continues. The Emperor of Mankind has handed the reins of command to his favoured son, the Warmaster Horus. Yet all is not well in the armies of the Imperium. Horus is still battling against the jealousy and resentment of his brother primarchs, and when he is injured in combat on the planet Davin, he must also battle his inner daemon. With all the temptations that Chaos has to offer, can the weakened Horus resist?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Fans of Warhammer won't be disappointed

  • By Chris on 05-23-18

Not quite as good as the first

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-16-18

Toby Longworth’s performance was excellent but the story and characterization isn’t quite up to the first novels standard. I felt like the fall of Horus was abrupt and out of character, much too easily fooled for a man that is supposed to be a borderline demigod.

  • Star Wars: Most Wanted

  • By: Rae Carson
  • Narrated by: Saskia Maarleveld
  • Length: 7 hrs and 55 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 923
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 871
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 869

Set before the events of Solo: A Star Wars Story! Han and Qi'ra don't have a lot in common other than not having a lot. They're street kids on the industrial planet Corellia, doing whatever it takes to get by, dreaming of something more. They each jump at a chance to prove themselves in the perilous world of Corellia's criminal underbelly, only to discover they are on the same mission for the same unscrupulous boss. When the job goes disastrously wrong, Han and Qi'ra are on the run.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • A solid if uninspired Star Wars adventure

  • By Joseph Born on 05-25-18

Great stand alone story

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-12-18

Though a bit short (standard length for YA fare), the story delivers a fast-paced story of double dealing and adventure that suits the tone of the Solo film. I haven’t loved a lot of recent Star Wars material but this story hit the spot - I’ll definitely be revisiting it!

  • Star Wars: Smuggler's Run

  • A Han Solo Adventure
  • By: Greg Rucka
  • Narrated by: Marc Thompson
  • Length: 3 hrs and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 669
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 623
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 622

Han Solo and Chewbacca the Wookiee team up for an all-new adventure in this thrilling upper middle grade novel. Set between Star Wars: A New Hope and Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back, the story follows everyone's favorite pair of smugglers as they fly the Millennium Falcon on a top-secret mission for the Rebellion. Hidden in the story are also hints and clues about the upcoming film Star Wars: The Force Awakens, making this a must-listen for fans old and new!

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • "Chewie, we're home."

  • By Daniel on 10-19-15

Fun short story

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-30-18

Greg Rucka is one of my favorite comics writers, and he doesn’t disappoint here. It feels like Star Wars and his Han and Chewie are on point. The story could have had a little more meat on the bones, but was a fun little diversion with some cool world building and a set of cool villains, particularly commander Beck. A little on the short side for a full credit/$20 but the production was good like always with the Star Wars titles/Marc Thompson. The only flaw was they should have used pre recorded Chewbacca sounds.

  • Last Shot

  • Star Wars
  • By: Daniel José Older
  • Narrated by: Marc Thompson, Daniel José Older, January LaVoy
  • Length: 11 hrs and 12 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,106
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1,978
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,975

It's one of the galaxy's most dangerous secrets: a mysterious transmitter with unknown power and a reward for its discovery that most could only dream of claiming. But those who fly the Millennium Falcon throughout its infamous history aren't your average scoundrels. Not once, but twice, the crew of the Falcon tries to claim the elusive prize - first, Lando Calrissian and the droid L3-37 at the dawn of an ambitious career, and later, a young and hungry Han Solo with the help of his copilot, Chewbacca.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • It's a letdown and boring

  • By Amazon Customer on 04-19-18

Doesn’t feel like Star Wars

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-22-18

I want to start out by saying that I nearly always finish a book, regardless of whether I like or dislike it. I could not finish this book. Before I get into it, I will say there were TWO things I did like in the book: the author does a great job of portraying Han's struggles to have a normal life and be a father to Ben and husband to Leia. Second, I like that he introduced a non-binary character into the book (a Star Wars first, I think). I thought the character was OBNOXIOUS, but I am glad that the character was introduced with subtlety and accepted without mention (the only reason you know as the reader is the pronouns used to describe them).

To the problems: the book doesn't FEEL like Star Wars at all - it is full of modern slang and phrases that make it impossible to get immersed in a fantasy/sci-fi setting (bust his ass up. bro, ass, ass, ass, daaaaayuuum, etc). The author has written in a undertone of Han being a ignorant racist for some reason (I don't remember seeing anything to suggest that in the films, barring his dislike of droids), and everything from Lando's perspective makes him seem like a creepy sexual predator rather than a suave con man. There are also a slew of gimmicky characters like a "slicing prodigy Ewok" and "woke Gungan" that add little and distract tremendously. They are both there to challenge stereotypes, but it is handled with no subtlety and in a way that just seems more 4th wall breaking joke than political statement. He could have just had the Gungan defy expectations rather then have him also go on a five minute diatribe about how Han is a racist and the dangers of stereotypes, all the while winking at fans about Jar-Jar hate.

However, I don't want this to sound like a fandom rage rant: There are some serious pacing and writing issues beyond its genre problems. There are 3-4 separate timelines going on in the story and they switch back and forth so often that the actual story progresses at a snail's pace. I've read other books that take a similar approach and feel like many threads being woven together throughout the book. In this novel, you have to get about a third of the way through for the actual plot to really start. The character's motivations for involvement in the plot are very shallow and contrived and they take actions very out of proportion with the threat (firing on New Republic ships and seemingly being prepared to shoot it out with New Republic officers?!) The villain is also completely uninteresting and unthreatening - I got no real sense of menace or threat from him. Overall, between the cringy new characters and poor plot, I returned the book while about 2/3 of the way through. I've read a few of the author's other books and had a similar experience - I figured I'd give him one more shot in a different franchise. Basically, he has some good ideas and can get into characters heads, but tends to craft a pretty flimsy story. I have to say I was pretty disappointed, as I am always on the lookout for a new author to follow, and Older gets a lot of hype. I might try him again in a few years and see if he progresses as a writer.

  • Babylon's Ashes

  • The Expanse, Book 6
  • By: James S. A. Corey
  • Narrated by: Jefferson Mays
  • Length: 19 hrs and 58 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,595
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 7,925
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,894

The Free Navy - a violent group of Belters in black-market military ships - has crippled the Earth and begun a campaign of piracy and violence among the outer planets. The colony ships heading for the thousand new worlds on the far side of the alien ring gates are easy prey, and no single navy remains strong enough to protect them. James Holden and his crew know the strengths and weaknesses of this new force better than anyone.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • lots of filler

  • By Jesse Stevens II on 12-21-16

Best Expanse Novel Yet

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-13-17

Continuing right on the heels of Nemesis Games, Babylon's Ashes continues to ramp up the tension as the war for what remains of the solar system begins in earnest. We see the effects of the last five books really start to take their toll on the various characters, and you feel the weight of their decisions and age start to press down upon them. Against all of this, there is the rising tension of the seemingly forgotten alien artifacts in humanity's back yard that continues to be a looming mystery that threatens all humanity, even as its members squabble for control of a dying solar system. I think this book (and Nemesis games before it) really show the growth of Corey as a writer; he has learned from the successes and failures of his previous novels and really seems to have distilled down the Expanse to its core components. If you were disappointed in Cibola Burn like I was, I would recommend finishing out the series for these two books!

AUDIBLE 20 REVIEW SWEEPSTAKES ENTRY

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Private

  • By: James Patterson, Maxine Paetro
  • Narrated by: Peter Hermann
  • Length: 7 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 24,134
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 21,509
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 21,480

Former Marine helicopter pilot Jack Morgan runs Private, a renowned investigation company with branches around the globe. It is where you go when you need maximum force and maximum discretion. The secrets of the most influential men and women on the planet come to Jack daily - and his staff of investigators uses the world's most advanced forensic tools to make and break their cases.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • private

  • By Meaghan Bynum on 07-01-10

To cringe-worthy to finish

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-28-17

What would have made Private better?

I couldn't even finish it - Every scene just sought to top the last in sheer cliched, eye-rolling machismo. It's trying to be film noir, James Bond, and Hollywood and does none well. The characters have no personality other than "manly". If I didn't know better, I would have thought it was a parody of the genre it is trying to emulate.

Would you ever listen to anything by James Patterson and Maxine Paetro again?

Nope, that was a brutal few hours.

Did Peter Hermann do a good job differentiating all the characters? How?

Not really, he wasn't bad...but all males were just varying levels of gravely. Females were also pretty gravely. Everyone had a sort of "too-cool-for-emotions" delivery.

If you could play editor, what scene or scenes would you have cut from Private?

I only got a few hours in, but just the incessant descriptions of cars, wealth, and celebrity name dropping. There is about 1 part story to 4 parts LA celebrity fetish in the first several chapters.

  • Cibola Burn

  • The Expanse, Book 4
  • By: James S. A. Corey
  • Narrated by: Jefferson Mays
  • Length: 20 hrs and 7 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,451
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 9,665
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,619

An empty apartment, a missing family, that's creepy. But this is like finding a military base with no one on it. Fighters and tanks idling on the runway with no drivers. This is bad juju. Something wrong happened here. What you should do is tell everyone to leave. The gates have opened the way to a thousand new worlds, and the rush to colonize has begun. Settlers looking for a new life stream out from humanity's home planets. Ilus, the first human colony on this vast new frontier, is being born in blood and fire.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Jefferson Mays is back!

  • By Joe R. on 03-30-17

A story the mostly didn't need to be told.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-28-17

Would you try another book from James S. A. Corey and/or Jefferson Mays?

I've liked the previous books in the series, so I'll hope this one's poor plotting was just a fluke. I will definitely check out the next book, at least.

What could James S. A. Corey have done to make this a more enjoyable book for you?

The story of the ancient alien ruins and exploration of New Terra was an interesting enough story to stand on its own. The major problem is with the chief of security, Mertree. For some reason, people continue to let this guy be an unhinged sociopath for 75% of the book and it just doesn't make any sense. He isn't being clever or anything, people just keep trusting him and letting him live because it adds an extra layer of conflict to the story that feels PAINFULLY contrived and altogether unnecessary. I felt like all the major payers were acting against their character to allow someone so obviously evil to live. LOTS of people die because Holden doesn't just let Amos put a bullet in his head within 30 seconds of meeting him. Instead of making a smart villain for the book, Corey just made all his protagonists act like idiots for the majority of the book. And in the end, they basically just do what they should have done all along...it is just lazy, sloppy writing as far as I am concerned and took away from the underlying story of a cool alien civilization and disaster.

Have you listened to any of Jefferson Mays’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

He is always great and his acting is the only thing that salvaged this book for me.

Did Cibola Burn inspire you to do anything?

Write a better story?

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

Sapiens audiobook cover art
  • Sapiens

  • A Brief History of Humankind
  • By: Yuval Noah Harari
  • Narrated by: Derek Perkins
  • Length: 15 hrs and 18 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 17,699
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 15,752
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 15,661

One hundred thousand years ago, at least six human species inhabited the Earth. Today there is just one. Us. Homo sapiens. How did our species succeed in the battle for dominance? Why did our foraging ancestors come together to create cities and kingdoms? How did we come to believe in gods, nations, and human rights; to trust money, books, and laws; and to be enslaved by bureaucracy, timetables, and consumerism?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Sums it up nicely

  • By Mark on 05-15-15

More philosophy than science

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-11-17

The author has a number of very thought provoking ideas, but the delivery of them feels more like a manifesto of opinions than anything really rooted in scientific inquiry. The book starts strong, describing the mechanisms for the ascent of Homo sapiens and fall of other members of genus homo. However, the middle of the book diverts into a out of place tangent that attempts to use loosey-goosey