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Joan Mora

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  • 35
  • helpful votes
  • 22
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  • Girls & Boys

  • By: Dennis Kelly
  • Narrated by: Carey Mulligan
  • Length: 1 hr and 46 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,863
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,721
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,708

A pulse-pounding new play from Tony Award-winning® playwright Dennis Kelly takes you on a journey that is at once hilarious, gripping, and heartbreaking. This world-premiere production starring Carey Mulligan (The Great Gatsby, An Education) is available exclusively on Audible after a celebrated run at the Royal Court Theatre in London and off-Broadway at the Minetta Lane Theatre. 

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I have never heard a story performed so well.

  • By Erin Reeve on 07-05-18

Crushing story, phenomenal performance

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-14-18

Voice and story were mesmarizing - brilliantly performed. Tragic and heart wrenching, with piercingly snarky dialogue.

  • Days Without End

  • A Novel
  • By: Sebastian Barry
  • Narrated by: Aidan Kelly
  • Length: 7 hrs and 58 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,183
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,087
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,088

Thomas McNulty, having fled the Great Famine in Ireland and now barely 17 years old, signs up for the US Army in the 1850s and with his brother in arms, John Cole, goes to fight in the Indian Wars - against the Sioux and the Yurok - and, ultimately, in the Civil War. Orphans of terrible hardships themselves, they find these days to be vivid and alive, despite the horrors they see and are complicit in. Moving from the plains of Wyoming to Tennessee, Sebastian Barry's latest work is a masterpiece of atmosphere and language.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Stunning, disturbing, amazing

  • By Donna Deal on 07-28-17

One of the best - story and performance.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-13-17

Spectacular and brutal Civil War-era drama with vivid voice and characters, in a tightly woven plot. This one will stay with me.

30 of 36 people found this review helpful

  • The Light Between Oceans

  • A Novel
  • By: M. L. Stedman
  • Narrated by: Noah Taylor
  • Length: 10 hrs and 21 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 7,409
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 6,623
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,585

In 1918, after four harrowing years on the Western Front, Tom Sherbourne returns to Australia to take a job as the lighthouse keeper on remote Janus Rock. To this isolated island, where the supply boat comes only four times a year and shore leaves are granted every other year at best, Tom brings a young, bold, and loving wife, Isabel. Three years later, after two miscarriages and one stillbirth, the grieving Isabel is tending the grave of her newly lost infant when she hears a baby’s cries on the wind. A boat has washed up on shore carrying a dead man and a living baby.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Touching Story told and read with great insight.

  • By Deborah on 10-29-12

Perfect novel

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-28-13

Any additional comments?

Tom Sherbourne is a medaled veteran of The Great War, a man of principle and character who dragged men to safety and always followed the rules. He’s grateful for a job manning the lighthouse on Janus Rock, a remote peninsula off Australia’s coast, where he can methodically work and live his days in order and sameness.

On a trip to the mainland, he meets the lovely, spirited Isabel, and returns to Janus Rock with her to carve a life. There she loves and cares for him, explores the small island, and longs for children. She miscarries twice and Tom would do anything to see her happy again. One day, mere weeks after delivering a stillborn child, a small boat washes onto shore. Inside is a dead man—and a live baby. Isabel views this as a sign from God.

Despite Tom’s insistence that they report the man and baby, Isabel protests. The mother is surely dead, the baby has no one but them. Tom loves her beyond measure and agrees to wait. The gravity of their decision weighs on him, but the problem is, he falls in love with the little Lucy, too. Two years later, when visiting the mainland, they learn someone has never stopped looking for the little one, whose name is not Lucy at all.

Rarely does a novel come along that is so perfectly crafted, so packed with flawed, believable characters. Every word, every scene, has a purpose. The plot twists and bends to unexpected places, thrusting the characters into situations as rough as the raging ocean. Ms. Stedman is a masterful storyteller, has a keen eye and knows how to portray raw emotion on the page.

The wonderful narrator, Noah Taylor, truly brought the characters to life.
What a stunning debut. Highly recommend!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry

  • A Novel
  • By: Rachel Joyce
  • Narrated by: Jim Broadbent
  • Length: 9 hrs and 57 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,521
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,772
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,777

Meet Harold Fry, recently retired. He lives in a small English village with his wife, Maureen, who seems irritated by almost everything he does, even down to how he butters his toast. Little differentiates one day from the next. Then one morning the mail arrives, and within the stack is a letter addressed to Harold from a woman he hasn't seen or heard from in 20 years. Queenie Hennessy is in hospice and is writing to say goodbye. Harold pens a quick reply and, leaving Maureen to her chores, heads to the corner mailbox. But then Harold has a chance encounter, one that convinces him that he absolutely must deliver his message to Queenie in person.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Wonderful Walkabout

  • By FanB14 on 07-01-13

Exquisite writing, spot-on narration

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-28-13

What did you love best about The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry?

This poignant novel is about mistakes, grief, misunderstandings and one man's impossible journey to move on.

One of my favorite audio books, narrated by the wonderful Jim Broadbent. A perfect combination of stellar writing and spot-on delivery.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoet

  • By: David Mitchell
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Aris, Paula Wilcox
  • Length: 18 hrs and 59 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,010
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,189
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,190

In 1799, the artificial island of Dejima lies in Nagasaki Harbor as Japan’s outpost for the Dutch East Indies Company. There, Jacob de Zoet has come to make a fortune large enough to return to Holland and marry the woman he loves.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Less about the arrival more about the ride

  • By Kindle Customer on 10-26-12

Storytelling at its finest

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-28-13

What did you like best about this story?

The Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoet transported me back several generations to a fictional island off the coast of Japan in 1799. Jacob de Zoet (pronounced Yacob by the pitch-perfect reader) is a clerk for the Dutch East Indies Company, trying to earn enough money to return for his fiancé in Holland. He soon learns that honesty and fortitude have no place in the politically charged and corrupt island. He meets a shy Japanese woman whose scarred face has caused her much ridicule, but her skills as a midwife have earned her the respect she deserves. Jacob is drawn to her in ways he can’t explain, until one day, she is forced to use her skills in the most tragic circumstances and she is taken from him without a goodbye. Set in a backdrop of mountains, Buddhist monastery and secretive shrine, this powerful novel is filled with intrigue, deceit, love, betrayal and cruelty. This is the most exquisitely written novel I’ve read in a long time. It is a master class in novel writing, from the dialogue, to the flawlessly woven research, to the tension in every sentence. David Mitchell, I bow to you.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Persimmon Tree

  • By: Bryce Courtenay
  • Narrated by: Humphrey Bower
  • Length: 27 hrs and 56 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,977
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,434
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,419

The Persimmon Tree opens in Indonesia in 1942 on the cusp of Japanese invasion and the evacuation of Batavia (Jakarta) by the Dutch. Seventeen-year-old Nicholas Duncan is on holiday there, in pursuit of an exotic butterfly known as the Magpie Crow. It's an uncertain, dangerous time to be in Indonesia, and Nick's options of getting out are fast dwindling. Amidst the fear and chaos he falls in love with Anna, the beautiful daughter of a Dutch acquaintance, and she nicknames him 'Mr Butterfly'.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • An excellent sequel

  • By CBDC on 02-13-11

Tragic story, masterfully written

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-28-13

Any additional comments?

The Persimmon Tree is a sweeping drama about a young Australian butterfly collector in Batavia (Jakarta) who falls in love with an exotic beauty. Separated by circumstances in the Pacific at the onset of World War II, he sails to Australia, but their plans to meet there fail and he spends the next several years searching for her. It was a stunningly written story made even more so by Humphrey Bower's gorgeous narrating.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Signature of All Things

  • A Novel
  • By: Elizabeth Gilbert
  • Narrated by: Juliet Stevenson
  • Length: 21 hrs and 43 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,525
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,122
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 4,133

In The Signature of All Things, Elizabeth Gilbert returns to fiction, inserting her inimitable voice into an enthralling story of love, adventure and discovery. Spanning much of the 18th and 19th centuries, the novel follows the fortunes of the extraordinary Whittaker family as led by the enterprising Henry Whittaker - a poor-born Englishman who makes a great fortune in the South American quinine trade, eventually becoming the richest man in Philadelphia.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Don't miss this one

  • By Molly-o on 12-27-13

An exquisitely written, sweeping story

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-28-13

Any additional comments?

I found this to be one of the most compelling novels I’ve read. Even at 499 pages, the narrative is fluid and engaging. Exquisitely written, the characters and settings come alive. made this novel even more enjoyable for me was listening to the audio version narrated by the brilliant actress Juliet Stevenson. If you enjoy historical fiction and novels with strong female characters, this novel's for you. If you have an interest in botany, philosophy and world cultures, you will be in for an even greater treat.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful