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  • The Lady in the Tower

  • The Fall of Anne Boleyn
  • By: Alison Weir
  • Narrated by: Judith Boyd
  • Length: 16 hrs and 50 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 323
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 230
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 231

New York Times best-selling author Alison Weir tells the spellbinding tale of the last days of Henry VIII’s second wife. Accused of adultery, incest, and treason, Anne Boleyn is locked in the Tower of London on May 2, 1536. Despite maintaining her innocence, she’s quickly condemned to death. Soon, one sword stroke sends her into eternity. But as her remains rot in the sun—unblessed by coffin, marker, or funeral—few know the truth behind her swift demise.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Superb Narration

  • By Ana Mardoll on 11-03-12

Weir’s Best Yet

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-08-19

I’m a great fan of Alison Weir - she is my go-to historian for all things Tudor, and her telling of the perfect storm that was Anne Boleyn is a masterpiece. Her extensive research, which includes quotes and theories put forward by her Tudor historian peers, is impeccable. While I know it is impossible to have at hand all the facts about the Tudors - more is being discovered at an amazing rate - Alison Weir always leaves me with the impression that she’s scoured everything she could set eyes on.

The Lady in the Tower is a beautifully crafted work that cannot fail to please anyone who takes their Tudor history seriously.

  • 1922

  • By: Stephen King
  • Narrated by: Craig Wasson
  • Length: 5 hrs and 36 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 605
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 556
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 555

The chilling novella featured in Stephen King's New York Times best-selling short story collection Full Dark, No Stars - soon to be a Netflix original film starring Thomas Jane and Molly Parker. A violence awakens inside a man when his wife proposes selling off the family homestead, setting in motion a grisly train of murder and madness.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great story and narration

  • By indyemmett on 11-13-17

King writes again ....

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-14-18

This is the most enjoyable story from King for quite a while - at least, for me. I’ve always been a fan of King’s horror, and have felt as though he’s been - what? Avoiding horror lately?

I understand why, as a writer, King would go nuts if he couldn’t get his non-horror yayas out. But those of us who find his horror fantastic, we need a good old creep-show dose of horror to make us happy - this one pegged the creepy-meter! Thanks!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

It audiobook cover art
  • It

  • By: Stephen King
  • Narrated by: Steven Weber
  • Length: 44 hrs and 57 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,880
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,275
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,284

They were just kids when they stumbled upon the horror of their hometown. Now, as adults, none of them can withstand the force that has drawn them all back to Derry, Maine, to face the nightmare without end, and the evil without a name.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I thought I was desensitized

  • By Parola138 on 02-19-11

Still Scary After All These Years

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-07-17

The first time I read IT, I got halfway through it and had to put it down - for about two years. I plucked up my courage after that, picked it up, and read it all the way through. Then, of course, I read it again, and now I’ve listened to the Audible version, which is really SO well done! I’ve long been one of Mr. King’s ‘Constant Readers,’ and I’m glad this narrator did it justice! His vocalization of Pennywise was spot on! Crrrrreeeepy!

  • Broken Monsters

  • By: Lauren Beukes
  • Narrated by: Christine Lakin, Terra Deva, Sunil Mohatra, and others
  • Length: 13 hrs and 24 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 753
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 699
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 698

Detective Gabriella Versado has seen a lot of bodies. But this one is unique even by Detroit's standards: half boy, half deer, somehow fused together. As stranger and more disturbing bodies are discovered, how can the city hold on to a reality that is already tearing at its seams? If you're Detective Versado's geeky teenage daughter, Layla, you commence a dangerous flirtation with a potential predator online. If you're desperate freelance journalist Jonno, you do whatever it takes to get the exclusive on a horrific story.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Wonderful

  • By S. Yates on 08-10-17

Meh. I'm underwhelmed.

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-06-17

I kept waiting for something to happen; once it did, I didn't care. Oh well


0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Small Favor

  • The Dresden Files, Book 10
  • By: Jim Butcher
  • Narrated by: James Marsters
  • Length: 13 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 16,016
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 14,057
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 13,999

No one's tried to kill Harry Dresden for almost an entire year, and his life finally seems to be calming down. For once, the future looks fairly bright. But the past casts one hell of a long shadow.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Missing 2 minutes of audio!

  • By Daniel Eggert on 12-15-15

HOOKED

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-07-16

I have listened to the entire series. start to finish, this is my third run!

Cast of Shadows audiobook cover art
  • Cast of Shadows

  • By: Kevin Guilfoile
  • Narrated by: Scott Brick
  • Length: 16 hrs and 11 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 247
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 189
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 190

A bereaved doctor undertakes a diabolical experiment in a shattering philosophical thriller that anticipates the moral, social, and metaphysical dilemmas science is poised to confront. Davis Moore is a fertility doctor in Chicago specializing in reproductive cloning, when his 17-year-old daughter is brutally raped and murdered. The case is investigated but never solved. Months later, Moore retrieves her belongings from the police, and finds among them a vial containing the killer's DNA.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Original to a fault

  • By cristina on 10-03-12

A Hard-to-Put-Down Science-Driven Thriller!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-14-15

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

I would definitely recommend this audiobook to a friend - particularly any one of them who likes a good thriller. There are so many threads woven through this story, you have to pay attention while you're listening, or you might miss something. The writer's interweaving of these threads is masterful - bravo!

Did the plot keep you on the edge of your seat? How?

The plot really kept me on the edge of my seat. Because the subject matter and the plot is complex, I found myself looking for alone time and excuses to listen uninterrupted. Human cloning and the possible consequences are going to be an inevitable discussion in the future. Hearing the future novelized, with so many of its possible outcomes - even those that are truly unthinkable - is positively mesmerizing.

Have you listened to any of Scott Brick’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

I haven't heard any of Scott Brick's other work, so I have nothing with which to compare it. That said, his performance of this particular book is very (very!) well done, and he manages to read all the different characters' voices spot on. He does a great job with female characters - he doesn't make them sound ridiculously falsetto or "cartoonish," which is one of my peeves as a listener.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

I absolutely wanted to listen to the entire book in one sitting, but because I buy only unabridged books, and because I have a life, it was impossible. I definitely looked forward to the times when I could pick it up again, in between.

Any additional comments?

I hope Kevin Guilfoile will write more books along these lines. It has been great to hear a book with this depth, both of plot and characters. Guilfoile is extremely talented, and I have thoroughly enjoyed this work. Again - bravo!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Stardust

  • By: Neil Gaiman
  • Narrated by: Neil Gaiman
  • Length: 6 hrs and 23 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,291
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 4,572
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,565

Tristran Thorn has lost his heart to the hauntingly beautiful Victoria Forester. One crisp October night, as they watch, a star falls from the sky, and Victoria promises to marry Tristran if he'll retrieve the star and bring it back for her. It is this promise that sends Tristran on the most unforgettable adventure of his life.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Witty and magical

  • By R. BREEN on 12-21-06

Stardust is a Gaiman Classic

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-10-15

What made the experience of listening to Stardust the most enjoyable?

Strangely, it was the fact that Neil Gaiman was narrating his own work. He has a nimble and talented narrative style, and he was able to provide voices for all his characters with ease. I say "strangely" because many authors who narrate their own works really should be using a professional narrator rather than reading their own material. Gaiman is a rarity in that (at least as far as Stardust is concerned) his talent as a narrator is well matched to his talent as a writer, which is considerable.

What was one of the most memorable moments of Stardust?

One of Stardust's most memorable moments is actually a series of moments, when the dead brothers' ghosts are present for the murder of all their siblings. It's most amusing when, as ghosts, they launch into commentaries on their own deaths.

What does Neil Gaiman bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

Neil Gaiman's narration is exceptional because it provides the listener the unique opportunity of hearing the story exactly as the writer meant it to sound.

If you were to make a film of this book, what would the tag line be?

A film was made of this book, and the adaptation was wonderful. Michelle Pfeiffer, Mark Strong, and Peter O'Toole were in it, as well as Robert DeNiro, who played the most unforgettable pirate on film (including Johnny Depp's Captain Jack Sparrow, which is *realllly* saying something). I can't begin to think of an adequate tag line.

Any additional comments?

If you liked the movie, you'll like the book. While the book is a bit darker than the movie, neither is made less by the other. The book adds depth to the movie, while the movie adds quite a few great visuals and a fair amount of humor that the book doesn't have. Either way, I recommend reading the book and then watching the movie. Or vice versa. It's such a fun story, it's hard to imagine one without the other.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Asylum

  • By: Patrick McGrath
  • Narrated by: Sir Ian McKellen
  • Length: 8 hrs and 37 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 478
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 350
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 350

In the summer of 1959 Stella Raphael joins her psychiatrist husband, Max, at his new posting - a maximum-security hospital for the criminally insane. Stella soon falls under the spell of Edgar Stark, a brilliant sculptor who has been confined to the hospital for murdering his wife in a psychotic rage. But Stella's knowledge of Edgar's crime is no hindrance to the volcanic attraction that ensues -a passion that will consume Stella's sanity and destroy her and the lives of those around her.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • So enjoyed this book!

  • By Mebythesea on 10-07-08

Even Crazy is Better with Ian McKellen!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-10-15

What did you love best about Asylum?

The best thing about Asylum was its narrator, Ian McKellen. His character is ingenious and subtly sly by turns, and goes from being an observer to a player with a silky ease that's quite disturbing.

How would you have changed the story to make it more enjoyable?

I would have edited out some of the information that's nonessential to the plot. There are several scenes in the book that seem more like filler than anything that actually moves the plot forward in any sort of meaningful way.

What does Ian McKellen bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

McKellen's is the voice of the book - he's not only the narrator, but also a primary character as the action unfolds. His voice lures you into believing that he's simply telling the story of two ill-fated lovers and the fallout from their affair, not that he is intimately involved with all of the characters involved. His seemingly innocent retelling of their tale is made worse when you realize he had a subtle hand in the characters' actions and their ultimate downfall. His hands-off and seemingly benign non-intervention is made more sinister when you realize he could very well have prevented much of the tragedy that takes place as the narrative moves toward its conclusion.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

I think it was the dawning realization that the narrator had a direct role in the outcome that really got to me. It was a slow realization, and was revealed over time through related conversations and casual asides - not presented as a big "ta da!" It made the horrible events more horrible because so many of them could have been prevented with a little intervention on the part of the narrator. Instead, he stood back and with a cold eye watched the ruin of several lives running its course, rather than intervening. His own reasons were never directly revealed, although they were fairly obvious by the book's end.

Any additional comments?

It's a great book and I thoroughly enjoyed it. That said, while we were on vacation together, my sister kept asking me what was going on while I was listening, and when I'd tell her, she'd say it seemed exceptionally slow and unexciting. It wasn't what I'd call an "exciting" book, exactly, but more a close examination of several lives ruined by misplaced ideals and fictional notions of love imposed over a reality that matches neither. If you're looking for a high-octane/fast-action type of novel, this probably isn't for you. If you're willing to enjoy a carefully crafted study of obsession, madness, and coldly calculated inaction and ambition, then you'll probably enjoy it quite a bit.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • A Feast for Crows

  • A Song of Ice and Fire, Book 4
  • By: George R. R. Martin
  • Narrated by: Roy Dotrice
  • Length: 33 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 39,321
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 35,540
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 35,541

Few books have captivated the imagination and won the devotion and praise of readers and critics everywhere as has George R. R. Martin’s monumental epic cycle of high fantasy that began with A Game of Thrones. Now, in A Feast for Crows, Martin delivers the long-awaited fourth book of his landmark series, as a kingdom torn asunder finds itself at last on the brink of peace . . . only to be launched on an even more terrifying course of destruction.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Jarring change in Dotrice's performance

  • By Pi on 06-21-12

Not *Those* Crows - the Other Kind!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-19-15

Where does A Feast for Crows rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

I'm a complete geek and adore the Game of Thrones series, and because of this, it's difficult to rank any one of them against all the other books I've listened to. That said, I find myself being annoyed when a narrator does not maintain a consistent voice for a given character from one book to another. I don't blame the narrator in this instance because it's not as though he hasn't got about 300+ characters to deal with, over the course of four books, but when it comes to being consistent with the main players of the story - come on! Whoever the director was, he or she was being lazy. One sound-bite played for the narrator would have been enough to remind Mr. Dotrice that Petyr Baelish sounded oily in the first book of the series - and, therefore, should sound oily all the way throughout. Halfway through _Feast of Crows_, the characterization went from oily to gruff Highlander. Really? I had to go back and re-listen to the first part of the chapter simply because I could no longer tell who the characters were supposed to be.

What other book might you compare A Feast for Crows to and why?

_A Feast of Crows_, along with all the other books in the series, comes the closest to reminding me of James Clavell's novel, _Shogun_. Of course, GoT is ridiculously more complex, but they match, overall, with the depth of the characters of _Shogun_. I like it when authors are willing to take the time to make their characters multidimensional - it adds richness to the books.

Did the narration match the pace of the story?

The narration matched the pace of the story quite well. Roy Dotrice does an excellent job of the narrative aspects of the series.

Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

I can't say my reaction to _A Feast of Crows_ was extreme - it left me scratching my head in a couple of places, particularly with regard to the Sand Snakes and Dorne. Unless the author has some huge role for Dorne and the Dornish to play in the future, I really don't understand why they were brought into the series so late. Also, since their characters and actions/reactions were brought into the story rather abruptly, I didn't get much opportunity to develop a real feel for any of them. I found myself wondering whether Mr. Martin really does know where he's going with the series, or whether he's lost focus. So far, I don't find any of the Dornish characters particularly interesting - except for Oberyn Martell - the one Mr. Martin killed off, of course.

Any additional comments?

If you're a fan of the show, you owe it to yourself to listen to the books. I don't mean that in the smug and condescending way a lot of people seem to be who have read them. (I've never understood that.) Of *course* the books are different from the HBO series, but they don't take anything away from each other. HBO couldn't possibly have every single character or storyline on the series, or no one, especially the actors, would ever have time to sleep.

I can't say enough about the fabulous job the writers of the show are doing, though. They have managed to capture the essence of the books and their characters - which takes me back to why you really should read/listen to the series in all its unabridged glory. If you're a fan of the show, it will only add more depth to your understanding of what's happening and why, the characters' motivations, and the world they live in.Note to George R.R. Martin: Pleeeeeeeeease finish book six! You're killing me here!!!

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Mortality

  • By: Christopher Hitchens
  • Narrated by: Simon Prebble
  • Length: 2 hrs and 11 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 881
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 784
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 779

Throughout the course of his ordeal battling esophageal cancer, Christopher Hitchens adamantly and bravely refused the solace of religion, preferring to confront death with both eyes open. In this riveting account of his affliction, Hitchens poignantly describes the torments of illness, discusses its taboos, and explores how disease transforms experience and changes our relationship to the world around us. By turns personal and philosophical, Hitchens embraces the full panoply of human emotions as cancer invades his body and compels him to grapple with the enigma of death.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Death IS the DARK backing

  • By Darwin8u on 09-05-12

Mortality: Death Finds a Hitch

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-17-14

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

I would recommend this audiobook to a friend but only if that friend was familiar with at least some of Hitchens's vast volume of work. It would be a disservice to said friend, and to the late Hitchens himself if his observations about the process of dying were taken without some understanding of the man behind them.

Who was your favorite character and why?

Christopher Hitchens takes the reader with him through all the physical, medical, social, and cultural indignities that those dying from terminal cancer experience. His commentary on what starts as hope, and ends as resignation is witty, wry, and incredibly sad. I am one of those who was unaware of Hitchens during his life, and only came to appreciate him after he was gone. He was a brave man - it can rightly be said that he lived the hell out of the life he had, and he kept going past the point where stronger people might rightly have quit.

Which character – as performed by Simon Prebble – was your favorite?

The author and his battle against cancer were the characters of the book - I thought Simon Prebble did a great job, particularly at the end of the book, at which point the narrative ceases, and there are a number of notes Hitchens had left behind relating to the book. Prebble read them in a thoughtful, considered way, that breathed Hitchens into them. It could easily have come out sounding more like a To Do list.

Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

My overwhelming reaction was sorrow that there was no more of Christopher Hitchens in this world to be had. Despite his talent and the huge body of work, both in letters and in speeches and debates that can be found in any number of places on the Internet, there's no more of that cutting intellect and brilliant reasoning that was the essence of Hitchens. He was a finite resource, and Mortality at least gave me some room to mourn what I'd discovered and lost, all within a short period of time.

Any additional comments?

It's not a happy book. There is no happy ending. If you've found Hitchens already, then you're probably aware of Richard Dawkins, and Sam Harris, just to name two of his peers who have some very interesting views in common. If you haven't read them, you should. They, too, are entirely logical, unrepentant atheists, and represent angles of atheism that Hitchens sometimes touched on, and often discussed with both of these gentlemen. Look them up on YouTube when you get a chance.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful