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Chris Lunt

Mountain View, CA United States
  • 10
  • reviews
  • 24
  • helpful votes
  • 168
  • ratings
  • The God Delusion

  • By: Richard Dawkins
  • Narrated by: Richard Dawkins, Lalla Ward
  • Length: 13 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,404
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,257
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,165

Discover magazine recently called Richard Dawkins "Darwin's Rottweiler" for his fierce and effective defense of evolution. Prospect magazine voted him among the top three public intellectuals in the world (along with Umberto Eco and Noam Chomsky). Now Dawkins turns his considerable intellect on religion, denouncing its faulty logic and the suffering it causes.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Charming, smart, and unpretentious

  • By Blake on 06-04-13

Lebron James plays 4-square

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-16-15

He's a great storyteller (and reader), and his arguments are always beautiful, but he's necessarily responding to ridiculous arguments. I understand why, but that doesn't make it interesting to watch. Unless you have any religious feelings at all, stick to his other books.

  • Moral Tribes

  • Emotion, Reason, and the Gap Between Us and Them
  • By: Joshua Greene
  • Narrated by: Mel Foster
  • Length: 14 hrs and 53 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 491
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 411
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 412

A pathbreaking neuroscientist reveals how our social instincts turn Me into Us, but turn Us against Them - and what we can do about it. The great dilemma of our shrinking world is simple: never before have those we disagree with been so present in our lives. The more globalization dissolves national borders, the more clearly we see that human beings are deeply divided on moral lines - about everything from tax codes to sexual practices to energy consumption - and that, when we really disagree, our emotions turn positively tribal.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • An Exceedingly Interesting...

  • By Douglas on 01-29-14

Fundamentally flawed

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-26-15

He never explained why it was good to help other people. He appealed to our reason when resolving moral conflict, but failed to apply it to the root of his own argument, and more importantly, he never acknowledged that. Good examples and science though.

2 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • The Cricket on the Hearth

  • By: Charles Dickens
  • Narrated by: Jim Dale
  • Length: 3 hrs and 37 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 4,472
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 3,803
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 3,842

The holidays are upon us, and this year Audible is very happy to present to our members one of Charles Dickens’ most popular Christmas stories, The Cricket on the Hearth. This holiday classic (original subtitle: “A Fairy Tale of Home”) tells the innocent, picturesque, and charming story of a poor family and their would-be guardian angel; in short, a delightful vision of Victorian Christmas. As always, a great story calls for a great voice, so we’ve brought in legendary actor and record-breaking Audie and Grammy award-winning narrator Jim Dale (The Night Circus). Happy holidays and happy listening!

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Why Does Everyone Call This A Christmas Story?

  • By John on 12-21-15

The longest 3 hour book

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-02-14

Would you like to see how long you can string out clumsy and unnecessary exposition? I will explain Cricket on the Hearth in 4 words:
Paid.
By.
The.
Word.

  • The Second Machine Age

  • Work, Progress, and Prosperity in a Time of Brilliant Technologies
  • By: Erik Brynjolfsson, Andrew McAfee
  • Narrated by: Jeff Cummings
  • Length: 8 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,639
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,381
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,373

In recent years, Google’s autonomous cars have logged thousands of miles on American highways and IBM’s Watson trounced the best human Jeopardy! players. Digital technologies — with hardware, software, and networks at their core — will in the near future diagnose diseases more accurately than doctors can, apply enormous data sets to transform retailing, and accomplish many tasks once considered uniquely human.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Good for the periphery

  • By Chris Lunt on 03-02-14

Good for the periphery

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-02-14

Well organized, thoughtfully written, but if you're reading in the space, absolutely no new information. This is a book I'll recommend to readers who aren't already reading blogs and books covering similar topics. I did like the presentation as hopeful without being fervent.

14 of 15 people found this review helpful

  • Nudge

  • Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth, and Happiness
  • By: Richard H. Thaler, Cass R. Sunstein
  • Narrated by: Sean Pratt
  • Length: 10 hrs and 35 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 266
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 111
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 112

Every day, we make decisions on topics ranging from personal investments to schools for our children to the meals we eat to the causes we champion. Unfortunately, we often choose poorly. The reason, the authors explain, is that, being human, we are all susceptible to various biases that can lead us to blunder. Our mistakes can make us poor and unhealthy. We often make bad decisions about education, personal finance, health care, family, and the environment.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Book I Keep Coming Back To

  • By Joshua Kim on 06-10-12

Thoughtful but tedious

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-19-13

Good ideas belabored. I respect that they raised counter arguments. I'm happy there's a practicum for "Thinking Fast and Slow", but I'd like more examples in less detail.

  • Absolutely Small

  • How Quantum Theory Explains Our Everyday World
  • By: Michael D. Fayer
  • Narrated by: Scott Peterson
  • Length: 10 hrs and 24 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 81
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 42
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 43

Our intuition about how things should behave is usually right in the everyday world. We see the baseball soar in the air, arc, drop, and lie stationary on the ground. Through data gathered by our senses and basic knowledge of the laws of classical mechanics, the motion of a ball makes perfect sense. But enter the world of the tiniest particles on earth—the motion of electrons, the shapes of molecules—and everything we think we know about the world radically changes.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • No math - wrong

  • By Chris on 12-21-10

Not appropriate for an audiobook

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-23-13

This book is very dependent on drawings, graphs and equations, and although the offer has kept it to a minimum, you can't follow large parts of the book purely from audio. Somewhere in chapter 14 I broke down and got the paper book.

  • Bonk

  • The Curious Coupling of Science and Sex
  • By: Mary Roach
  • Narrated by: Sandra Burr
  • Length: 9 hrs and 29 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,663
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1,923
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,928

The study of sexual physiology has been a paying career or a diverting sideline for scientists as far-ranging as Leonardo da Vinci and James Watson. The research has taken place behind the closed doors of laboratories, brothels, MRI centers, pig farms, sex-toy R&D labs, and Alfred Kinsey's attic.

Mary Roach, "The funniest science writer in the country", devoted the past two years to stepping behind those doors. In Bonk, Roach shows us how and why sexual arousal and orgasm can be so hard to achieve and what science is doing to slowly make the bedroom a more satisfying place.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Interesting-not as engaging as "Stiff"

  • By Jani on 05-13-09

Unexpected comedy

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-21-13

This book has some great laughs, and much credit goes to the narrator, who delivered the lines with aplomb. The book was squirm-worthy much of the time, and the topic was getting a little tired by the end, but enjoyed the book the whole way through, and found Mary Roach to be a unique voice in non-fiction writing.

  • Redirect

  • The Surprising New Science of Psychological Change
  • By: Timothy D. Wilson
  • Narrated by: Grover Gardner
  • Length: 7 hrs and 42 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 219
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 172
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 172

Why might some sex education programs result in more teen pregnancies? Why did reading that self-help book make you feel less happy? What's the best way to recover from trauma? Can we actually improve our lives by redirecting our thinking?

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Why programs fail.

  • By Brian on 08-24-12

"But when we use the story editing approach..."

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-19-13

Repetitious. Story editing is the golden hammer, and the author trots it out again and again after dissing the competition. He may be right, but the idea gets stretched thin, and I was losing interest before the book was done.

2 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Overdiagnosed

  • Making People Sick in Pursuit of Health
  • By: Dr. H. Gilbert Welch, Dr. Lisa M. Schwartz, Dr. Steven Woloshin
  • Narrated by: Sean Runnette
  • Length: 9 hrs and 37 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 434
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 385
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 389

Going against the conventional wisdom reinforced by the medical establishment and Big Pharma that more screening is the best preventative medicine, Dr. Gilbert Welch builds a compelling counterargument that what we need are fewer, not more, diagnoses. Documenting the excesses of American medical practice that labels far too many of us as sick, Welch examines the social, ethical, and economic ramifications of a health-care system that unnecessarily diagnoses and treats patients.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Must Read for All!

  • By J. D. Portnoy on 12-07-12

Makes you think twice about looking for trouble

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-02-13

I agree with the author that overdiagnosis is a real problem that harms a good number of people, but I don't necessarily agree that the solution is to avoid diagnostic technology. The book is thoughtful and well constructed, that said, it is somewhat monotonous. It's a killer magazine article, but for the casual reader is a bit thin for for a book.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Theory That Would Not Die

  • How Bayes' Rule Cracked the Enigma Code, Hunted Down Russian Submarines, and Emerged Triumphant from Two Centuries of Controversy
  • By: Sharon Bertsch McGrayne
  • Narrated by: Laural Merlington
  • Length: 11 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 328
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 284
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 286

Bayes' rule appears to be a straightforward, one-line theorem: by updating our initial beliefs with objective new information, we get a new and improved belief. To its adherents, it is an elegant statement about learning from experience. To its opponents, it is subjectivity run amok. Sharon Bertsch McGrayne here explores this controversial theorem and the human obsessions surrounding it.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Read Up on Baye's Before Reading

  • By Lynn on 07-15-12

All the wrong details

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-30-12

Would you like to hear about warring academic camps, or would you rather understand in detail how Bayes was applied to solve the problems mentioned in the title? If it's the latter, you'll be disappointed.

5 of 6 people found this review helpful