LISTENER

AppleCedAR

USA
  • 16
  • reviews
  • 52
  • helpful votes
  • 111
  • ratings
  • Creativity, Inc.

  • Overcoming the Unseen Forces That Stand in the Way of True Inspiration
  • By: Ed Catmull, Amy Wallace
  • Narrated by: Peter Altschuler
  • Length: 12 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,952
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,025
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,990

Creativity, Inc. is a book for managers who want to lead their employees to new heights, a manual for anyone who strives for originality, and the first-ever, all-access trip into the nerve center of Pixar Animation - into the meetings, postmortems, and "Braintrust" sessions where some of the most successful films in history are made. It is, at heart, a book about how to build a creative culture - but it is also, as Pixar co-founder and president Ed Catmull writes, "an expression of the ideas that I believe make the best in us possible."

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A good listen... If you speed up the player

  • By andrea gini on 10-06-15

Catmull Inspires

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-21-18

Is "Creativity, Inc." prophetic and insightful? Definitely. Moreover, it is an inspiring look back at trials and success, risks and results.
It equally provides path forward, beyond the walls of Pixar and Disney toward a creative path in business. This biography is not about being in a creative industry, but more about being creative in business, and Ed Catmull delivers beautifully.

  • Misbehaving

  • The Making of Behavioral Economics
  • By: Richard Thaler
  • Narrated by: L. J. Ganser
  • Length: 13 hrs and 35 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,466
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,903
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,867

Richard H. Thaler has spent his career studying the radical notion that the central agents in the economy are humans - predictable, error-prone individuals. Misbehaving is his arresting, frequently hilarious account of the struggle to bring an academic discipline back down to earth - and change the way we think about economics, ourselves, and our world.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I'm a lot smarter than I was before

  • By Barrie Bramley on 10-04-15

Inspiring Insights

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-20-18

This is a fascinating read/listen. The inspiration behind Thayer's pursuits are as entertaining as they are insightful.

  • Naked Money

  • A Revealing Look at What It Is and Why It Matters
  • By: Charles Wheelan
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Davis
  • Length: 13 hrs and 11 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 336
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 304
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 302

Consider the $20 bill. It has no more value, as a simple slip of paper, than Monopoly money. Yet even children recognize that tearing one into small pieces is an act of inconceivable stupidity. What makes a $20 bill actually worth $20? In the third volume of his best-selling Naked series, Charles Wheelan uses this seemingly simple question to open the door to the surprisingly colorful world of money and banking.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Brilliant, Witty, Easy to Understand, & Well Read!

  • By Ken Beller on 04-30-16

the magic of money demistified

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-26-18

well written
well read
a fascinating trek through the system that are only feasible through fiat, currency and exchange

  • Competing Against Luck

  • The Story of Innovation and Customer Choice
  • By: Clayton M. Christensen, Taddy Hall
  • Narrated by: John Pruden
  • Length: 7 hrs and 25 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,026
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 881
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 873

The foremost authority on innovation and growth presents a path-breaking book every company needs to transform innovation from a game of chance to one in which they develop products and services customers not only want to buy but are willing to pay premium prices for. How do companies know how to grow? How can they create products that they are sure customers want to buy? Can innovation be more than a game of hit and miss? Harvard Business School professor Clayton Christensen has the answer.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Leaving Luck For Those Who Need It

  • By Dan Collins on 02-11-17

Great Counterpoint to Information Overload

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-10-17

Would you listen to Competing Against Luck again? Why?

I would listen to Competing Against Luck again to recap key points in decision making. My reason for purchasing this book was for the same reason. Too often in design, we are faced with decisions being made based purely on user statistics while missing the mark in what the consumer really needs whether they know it or not. This book recaps Jobs Theory and Disruptive Technology nicely, and ups the ante with thought provoking material from the man who literally wrote to books on these theories: Clayton M. Christensen.

Who was your favorite character and why?

Clayton M. Christensen. The book is about his work and theories in business.

Have you listened to any of John Pruden’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

I have not listened John Pruden previously. He did a fine job.

If you were to make a film of this book, what would the tag line be?

Competing Against Luck

  • To Hell and Back

  • Europe 1914-1949
  • By: Ian Kershaw
  • Narrated by: John Curless
  • Length: 26 hrs and 43 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 500
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 449
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 447

The European catastrophe, the long continuous period from 1914 to1949, was unprecedented in human history - an extraordinarily dramatic, often traumatic, and endlessly fascinating period of upheaval and transformation.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Very good, well-educated reader/narrator.

  • By M. MCCASKEY on 01-19-16

Astounding Hisory

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-16-17

Very well read.
The overall story is engaging and a thought provoking eye opener for anyone not fully familiar with European history and the build up to the world wars.
The book does get overladen with statistics at times so can feel a bit clinical. The numbers however can be gut wrenching.
Overall, I loved this book.
~m

  • The Soul of a Chef

  • The Journey Toward Perfection
  • By: Michael Ruhlman
  • Narrated by: Donald Corren
  • Length: 12 hrs and 14 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 648
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 593
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 586

In his second in-depth foray into the world of professional cooking, Michael Ruhlman journeys into the heart of the profession. Observing the rigorous Certified Master Chef exam at the Culinary Institute of America, the most influential cooking school in the country, Ruhlman enters the lives and kitchens of rising star Michael Symon and the renowned Thomas Keller of the French Laundry. This fascinating audiobook will satisfy any listener's hunger for knowledge about cooking and food, the secrets of successful chefs, at what point cooking becomes an art form, and more.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Surprisingly good!

  • By Peter Y. Chapman on 10-27-14

Makes Me Wanna Cook

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-24-15

What did you love best about The Soul of a Chef?

The thing liked about this book is the subject. Cooking is interesting, the mindset is fascinating and the CSI is mystical. The thing I loved about The Soul of a Chef is the believable peek behind the curtain.

What other book might you compare The Soul of a Chef to and why?

"Life on the Line" is a book I might compare based on the detail regarding the inner workings of a professional kitchen and the conviction it takes to succeed. Likewise, "Butter, Bones & Butter" for the life psychology and growth as young cooks make their way from inauspicious beginnings.

What aspect of Donald Corren’s performance would you have changed?

Corren's read was flat for my tastes. Not a lot of dynamic range or inflection in the reading. Where some voice actors can make you forget your listening to a reader and transport you through the eyes of the writer, Donald Corren did not do this for me.

If you were to make a film of this book, what would the tag line be?

If The Soul' were to be made into a movie, the tagline could be "Brown Sauce, Taste It!"

Any additional comments?

The subject of the book made it compelling. Props to Ruhlman for being so dedicated to seeing the challenge through, but I do wish he had a bit more dynamic presence in his writing. The voicing didn't help. Hence the 4 stars.

4 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • Food of the Gods

  • The Search for the Original Tree of Knowledge : A Radical History of Plants, Drugs, and Human Evolution
  • By: Terence McKenna
  • Narrated by: Jeffrey Kafer
  • Length: 8 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,593
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,405
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,399

Terence McKenna hypothesizes that as the North African jungles receded, giving way to savannas and grasslands near the end of the most recent ice age, a branch of our arboreal primate ancestors left the forest canopy and began living in the open areas beyond. There they experimented with new varieties of foods as they adapted, physically and mentally, to the environment. Among the new foods found in this environment were psilocybin-containing mushrooms.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Very informative.

  • By Steven Honey on 09-17-15

Not My Cup of Hyperbole Gravy

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-11-15

Would you try another book from Terence McKenna and/or Jeffrey Kafer?

Not Likely. McKenna turned what could have been a thoroughly engaging subject and into a preachy soap box with a propagandist tone. I want to be knocked out by a book but the writing style here made me feel more like I was getting clobbered repeatedly by a cudgel. "Food of the Gods" was an epic rhetorical fail.

Would you ever listen to anything by Terence McKenna again?

I will certainly look McKenna up and if I find something compelling perhaps but suffering through another McKenna is not likely. Unfortunately, his path in writing is that of hyperbole thus rendering them far from palatable to me.

Who would you have cast as narrator instead of Jeffrey Kafer?

Kafer was actually the best part of this book overall. Very consistent. Not a lot of flare but even and I feel his tone matched the writing style very well.

You didn’t love this book... but did it have any redeeming qualities?

There are some really interesting kernels in the history, science and politics of drugs but overall, I found the work to be more rant than engaging. By comparison, I've found that the histories of food and its effect on society can be mind blowing, look up Jack Weatherford's "Indian Givers" if you want a book worthy of altering minds.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Shakespeare's Local: Six Centuries of History, One Pub

  • By: Pete Brown
  • Narrated by: Cameron Stewart
  • Length: 10 hrs and 41 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 30
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 26
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 26

Welcome to the George Inn near London Bridge; a cosy, wood-panelled, galleried coaching house a few minutes' walk from the Thames. Consider this: who else has made this their local over the last 600 years? Chaucer and his fellow pilgrims almost certainly drank in the George on their way to Canterbury. Shakespeare may have popped in from the nearby Globe, and we know that Dickens definitely did. Mail carriers changed their horses here, while sailors drank here before sailing.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Facinating Social History of a Pub's & People

  • By AppleCedAR on 07-11-15

Facinating Social History of a Pub's & People

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-11-15

Would you listen to Shakespeare's Local: Six Centuries of History, One Pub again? Why?

I've thoroughly enjoyed previous works by Pete Brown, and though I do appreciate Architecture, I did not expect to find a story about a building to be as compelling as was Shakespeare's Local. I do, without a doubt, love a good pint, so when the time comes to travel to the UK, The George will certainly rank high on my short list of landmarks to visit.

What other book might you compare Shakespeare's Local: Six Centuries of History, One Pub to and why?

Pete Brown writes with a distinctive style, so to compare, I'd have to say Hops and Glory! by none other than Pete Brown. Tales of interesting people (don't be surprised when Dickens shows up) that weave through compelling histories (the fortunate and the less than) and always with a tasty thread that binds (beer).

Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

I certainly laughed. Many times. I winced a bit too but never cried.

Any additional comments?

Thanks again to Pete Brown for surprising me in a most entertaining way. And thanks also, to Cameron Stewart for a reading that does the story justice!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Last Indian War: The Nez Perce Story

  • Pivotal Moments in American History
  • By: Elliott West
  • Narrated by: B. J. Harrison
  • Length: 14 hrs and 34 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 104
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 81
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 80

This newest volume in Oxford's acclaimed Pivotal Moments series offers an unforgettable portrait of the Nez Perce War of 1877, the last great Indian conflict in American history. It was, as Elliott West shows, a tale of courage and ingenuity, of desperate struggle and shattered hope, of short-sighted government action and a doomed flight to freedom.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • New Insights Into An Old Story

  • By Flavius Krakdaddius on 05-17-10

Well Grounded Expansion on Indian History

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-03-14

What made the experience of listening to The Last Indian War: The Nez Perce Story the most enjoyable?

In listening to the Last Indian War, I found a number of details within this book, actually filled in a lot of key details that have been missing from earlier writings. The research felt confident and comprehensive.

Who was your favorite character and why?

Chief Joseph was without question, the most memorably individual covered in this history. His name is well known but this book put away the myth and hype and provided what felt like, a very well balanced look at the man.

If you were to make a film of this book, what would the tag line be?

From where the sun now sits, I shall fight no more.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Food: A Cultural Culinary History

  • By: Ken Albala, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: Ken Albala
  • Length: 18 hrs and 22 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,918
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,633
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,603

Eating is an indispensable human activity. As a result, whether we realize it or not, the drive to obtain food has been a major catalyst across all of history, from prehistoric times to the present. Epicure Jean-Anthelme Brillat-Savarin said it best: "Gastronomy governs the whole life of man."

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • One of my top 3 favorite courses!

  • By Jessica on 12-28-13

Outstanding Reveal on Food

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-26-14

What made the experience of listening to Food: A Cultural Culinary History the most enjoyable?

Professor Ken Albala is well polished and presents in an very engaging way.

What did you like best about this story?

I love food and felt I was comfortably well informed about most things food. A Cultural Culinary History just expanded my Universe in a fun way with an incredibly fascinating wealth of information the evolution of this most common necessity.

Have you listened to any of Professor Ken Albala’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

Food: A Cultural Culinary History is the first I've heard of Professor Ken Albala's work. And I loved it.

If you were to make a film of this book, what would the tag line be?

Pillage the Pantry

Any additional comments?

Professor Ken Albala is incredibly knowledgeable on the subject of food and culinary history. I love his tone and just how comfortable he is with a subject that effects us all whether we know how or why exactly. I'll be listening to this Series again. It was that good.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful