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Mary Hirsch

Denver, CO
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  • Son of a Grifter

  • The Twisted Tale of Sante and Kenny Kimes, the Most Notorious Con Artists in America: A Memoir by the Other Son
  • By: Kent Walker, Mark Schone
  • Narrated by: John Glouchevitch
  • Length: 16 hrs and 38 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 140
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 134
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 133

In 1988 a troubled young man and his flamboyant mother were arrested for murdering a wealthy widow in her New York City mansion. Suddenly America was transfixed by a pair of real-life film noir characters. The media couldn't get enough of the twisted relationship between Sante Kimes and her 23-year-old son Kenny. But the most chilling story of all was never told - until now. Kent Walker, Sante's elder son, reveals how he survived 40 years of "the Dragon Lady's" very special brand of motherly love and still managed to get away.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • CON PEOPLE AT THEIR WORST!

  • By jaye on 07-03-17

Fascinating, well-written, well-narrated

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-10-18

Just a note that the book assumes that the reader has some awareness of the publicity around the murder of Irene Silverman by the author's mother Sante Kimes and the author's half-brother, her younger son Kenny Kimes. If not, I suggest a brief review of an article or two before reading the book. The earlier part of the book has several indirect references to what many readers are likely to already know from public media about the Kimes family saga, long before the author explains those events in his narrative.

This book is not really about crime, rather it is an autobiographical reflection on growing up under the thumb of a sociopathic mother who dominated the family, including a narcissistic but weak father. Actually, two weak fathers, the author's bio-father Edward Walker and stepfather Ken Kimes.

And it's not really about the flamboyant, outrageous, destructive mother as much as it is a tale of two brothers raised by the same people, one brother growing up to live a normal, middle-class life, and the other brother who became his mother's evil henchman and thrall. The oldest brother (the author) who rejected their mother's demands and is now a regular working stiff like the rest of us, and the other brother who is serving life without parole for two murders, having confessed to at least one other, all done at the behest of their mother.

The book put this reader into the family dynamic well enough to grasp at least some understanding of why events rolled forward as they did.

The narration by John Glouchevitch is superb. It is listenable and reflective of the author's tone. Near the end of the book the narrator perfectly captures the essence of Sante Kimes herself rambling endlessly to her son about her own twisted perceptions of life and reality.

Of course the book is Kent Walker's personal perspective on his family more than it is an objectively factual recounting, but nonetheless it is insightful. I am sure his stepfather Ken Kimes' own family, especially his adult children from his first marriage ("the creeps" per Sante Kimes), would have many objections to some of the material. Their view of the family history, and of their father, is not included. It would also be difficult for even a family member to ever know the full truth about characters as devious and conniving as Sante Kimes and her youngest son Kenny. This is Kent's own story, and there will always be personal biases in any autobiography.

If you have been interested in the sensational media accounts of the Kimes, including the movie "Like Mother, Like Son: The Strange Story of Sante and Kenny Kimes", this book gives a more complete picture of Sante and Kenny, and their life history before and after the Silverman murder.

The book was clearly published while Sante Kimes was still alive as it does not mention her death in prison in 2014 at the age of 79. Kenny Kimes is today in prison in California serving life without parole. It is truly 'life', as he is now 43 years old, having entered prison at age 25.



  • Full Disclosure

  • By: Stormy Daniels
  • Narrated by: Kate Burton
  • Length: 6 hrs and 58 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 366
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 331
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 332

She was already well-known in some circles before March 6, 2018, but that's probably the first time you heard the name Stormy Daniels. That's the day she filed a lawsuit against President Donald Trump over a nondisclosure agreement negotiated before the election but never signed. How did Stormy Daniels become the woman willing to take on a president? What is it like to be reviled by some, held up as a beacon of hope by others, and to be an object of fascination to all? In this audiobook, Stormy Daniels tells her whole story for the first time....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Entertaining, Funny, Shocking Beautiful

  • By B Van Het Hof on 10-04-18

Fascinating and well-told autobiography

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-11-18

I did not plan to buy or listen to this book, but I am so glad I was convinced to do so.

Stormy's story is well-written, engaging, honest, and glows with her warm humor. This book is a self-portrait of a bold spirit who navigated a dark and unconventional childhood largely on her own, to emerge as a strong, intelligent, courageous and daring woman in an unconventional profession.

She writes as a survivor who is without self-pity. Her journey illustrates how she taught herself very early to think and act for the long-term, to keep showing up and moving forward in spite of adversity and heartache, and to never let go of her priorities, her forthrightness and her humor.

Even without the public controversy, this book is a great read because it is about her whole life, not just the one thing the public knows about her.

In fact, the context of the current media firestorm around her story is likely to make the latter part of the book somewhat dated over time, and make the description of some events more defensive in tone than will make sense at a later date. Hopefully someday Stormy will be able to update her story and bring it forward to a time when things have cooled off for long enough that the controversy no longer matters.

Stormy would doubtless be gratified to hear that, for this reader at least, her book cleared up so many stereotypes and misconceptions that I have not known that I had about the people in her profession, and about the strange, ongoing uproar around the story of the one-time sexual encounter with a man who would become the President. For myself, going forward I will think differently, and better, about those involved in 'adult entertainment', thanks to Stormy's enlightening self-portrayal.

To date I have had very little interest in following the Trump/Cohen vs Stormy ruckus and I can't say I have any greater interest now, post "Full Disclosure". To me, this book is worth reading regardless, and fortunately most of it is not about the one event or its aftermath. However, the book did bring home to me that Mr. Cohen has been his own worst enemy in his ridiculous but ominous struggle. He wanted Stormy's silence, he had Stormy's silence, but he couldn't leave it alone.

Narrator Kate Burton gives this story the perfect voice and tone. I actually searched for video clips of some Stormy interviews in hopes that Burton's voice was similar to Stormy's own and thus adding to the authenticity of the story. I'm satisfied that Burton's narration is indeed in the spirit of Stormy's public voice, and if anything Stormy's own voice is even more pleasant.

Read / listen to this book for the story, putting the current events around it aside. This is one to enjoy, all on its own.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Menendez Murders

  • The Shocking Untold Story of the Menendez Family and the Killings that Stunned the Nation
  • By: Robert Rand
  • Narrated by: Eric Martin
  • Length: 11 hrs and 1 min
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 18
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 16
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 17

Married for 26 years, Jose and Kitty Menendez appeared to be a happy couple and proud parents. Twenty-one-year-old Lyle Menendez was enrolled at Princeton, where he was a star on the tennis team. Eighteen-year-old Erik Menendez had just graduated from Beverly Hills High and was about to start college at UCLA. The Menendezes appeared to be living the American dream. But it was all a façade.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • This book appears to be a work of fiction

  • By Amazon Customer on 11-09-18

Another look with more evidence

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-10-18

First: The narrator is superb. Beautifully listenable voice with just the right tone for a tale that blends a variety of emotions with factual and legal material.

The author is certainly right about one thing: Had the trial - even the murders - first taken place 30+ years later in this year 2018, the public attitude, the legal approach and the outcome would most certainly have been very different.

Once the entire factual case of the Menendez brothers is laid out - and that takes the entire book to accomplish - there is a great deal to think about for the jury that is the public readership, who forever sit in a judgment of their own about sensational crimes.

The book held my interest even through the wealth of detailed information. For those readers who, like myself, never knew much about the case, there are a number of substantive revelations that explain why the author is a believer in the brothers' story of sexual abuse and emotional manipulation that led up to the murders. The author makes sense of the tangle of disconnected public information that floats around about this case, including some of the more colorful side characters.

And, even at the end of the book, there are some final, recent revelations about events before the murders that lend more substance to the brothers' story.

Another element of the story that is mentioned only once in the author's comments at the end of the book, but which may well be the reason for writing it, is that even though both brothers are in prison under a sentence of life without parole, it may well be that their legal quest for freedom is not over yet. That alone makes this book worth reading, as any future legal action on behalf of the brothers will undoubtedly enjoy wide media coverage.

  • I Am Watching You

  • By: Teresa Driscoll
  • Narrated by: Elizabeth Knowelden
  • Length: 8 hrs and 24 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 3,260
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,857
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,854

When Ella Longfield overhears two attractive young men flirting with teenage girls on a train, she thinks nothing of it - until she realises they are fresh out of prison and her maternal instinct is put on high alert. But just as she's decided to call for help, something stops her. The next day, she wakes up to the news that one of the girls - beautiful, green-eyed Anna Ballard - has disappeared.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Creepy Thriller With Depth

  • By Sara on 07-15-18

Untangling the mystery, thread by thread

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-07-18

If you took the real-life Natalee Holloway story of an older teen / young adult who goes missing during a getaway trip with a friend her own age ...

... and completely re-worked it into a middle-class English setting, with a train trip to London instead an exotic vacation ...

That begins the premise of this book, which follows the incremental revelations and clues as to what actually happened to young Anna.

An engaging story that held my interest, much of the story is seen first-person through the troubled eyes of the one adult ear-witness to a portion of the girls' journey. But the tale is also broadly insightful into the inner stories of Anna's companion on the trip, Sarah, as well as both of the girls' families, and even some friends. How do those who want to find a dearly-loved missing person help with the investigation while protecting their own secrets?

Throw in the persevering official investigators as well, and this is a well-rounded progress of the gradual untangling of the mystery.

  • Mom Said Kill (Pinnacle True Crime)

  • By: Burl Barer
  • Narrated by: Kevin Stillwell
  • Length: 9 hrs and 43 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 22
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 19
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 19

When Jerry Heimann's son arrived at his father's home in Everett, Washington, he found his grandmother, an Alzheimer's patient, alone in the house, starving and dehydrated. His father was missing. The furniture was gone. Within hours, police realized that Jerry's live-in housekeeper, Barbara Opel, had robbed him and fled. But where was Jerry? The next morning, Barbara Opel's 11-year-old son led police to Jerry's body. Soon, stunned detectives were getting confessions from a ragtag group of teens and preteens.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • pretty good overall. crazy story for sure!

  • By Bernard Dupuy on 08-21-18

Young killers manipulated by an evil adult

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-07-18

But but but .... That seems to be the theme of this book. The author has a profound true story of murder to tell, that he himself seems to be struggling to define and understand. He's frank about that, at least.

Minors whose immature motivations were twisted into horrifying actions by a thoroughly evil adult manipulator ...
... but who willingly participated ...
... but who showed their limited understanding of the true nature of the murder and its consequences ...
... but who showed little remorse afterward ...
... but who would probably never have done such a thing without the engineering of one evil adult ...
... but who the criminal justice system has treated as adults with harshness and limited or no effort at reform ...
... and so on ...

In the second part of the book, the author has several other agendas to push at length concerning social evils and a flawed justice system. Some of these topics wander well away from this crime, but may be of interest to people who are concerned with the same issues.

Another major concern I have about the book is the utter lack of background given for several of the juvenile participants. The focus is on the adult instigator and the kids most under her direct influence, probably because that is the most easily accessible information through court, police and media records. However, other key minor participants have very little, sometimes nothing, from the author about their families or prior history. The exception is one girl whose life background became material in later court proceedings. By excluding those life histories, the author fails to give any real context for the influence that Barbara and their friends were able to exert to persuade them to kill.

Except for the one individual, the lack of background is very apparent for the young killers' own friends who were approached by the kids themselves after the murder, and who agreed to help hide the body and cover up the crime. What would those kids' family and friends have to say about their life history, and who they were as people, that would have explained why they were so suggestable? Those interviews and research appear not to have been done, or at least not included in the book.

To me, this book, in the form that I listened to it (it may be expanded someday), was far short of being ready to publish. It hasn't been cleaned up to stay on topic. And it needs considerably more research on several of the key participants. It's an interesting story, but it is far from finished. I wonder if the author wrote solely from court, police and prison records, and from whatever published media accounts he could find, because there isn't much in the way of interviews with other family members, or broader background information.

All that said, the author's interest in these young killers is relevant as they are probably far more typical of much juvenile crime than we would like to believe. There are other juveniles caught in the justice system who got there after following Fagan-adults into serious crime, or even attempted trips overseas to join ISIS. And who are treated just as harshly in the courts, but whose backgrounds and victims are not getting this much attention. The how's and why's are a troubling reality to face.

I would have given this book 4 or 5 stars if it were not for the research shortfalls on some of the young participants, and the general failure to stay on point. Otherwise it is reasonably well-written. But the editing and the holes in the research are holding it back from being a truly excellent book about an important topic.

  • Lethal White

  • A Cormoran Strike Novel
  • By: Robert Galbraith
  • Narrated by: Robert Glenister
  • Length: 22 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,700
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 4,472
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,447

When Billy, a troubled young man, comes to private eye Cormoran Strike's office to ask for his help investigating a crime he thinks he witnessed as a child, Strike is left deeply unsettled. While Billy is obviously mentally distressed, and cannot remember many concrete details, there is something sincere about him and his story. But before Strike can question him further, Billy bolts from his office in a panic. Trying to get to the bottom of Billy's story, Strike and Robin Ellacott - once his assistant, now a partner in the agency - set off on a twisting trail that leads them through the backstreets of London....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Best 22 hours of the last week

  • By Jennifer on 09-27-18

Characters to ride along with like old friends

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-06-18

Strike is back, with Robin right alongside.

"Lethal White" picks up just where the last one left off, and is as riveting as the previous books in the series. The main characters' survival of daily life, against the backdrop of their deeply flawed love lives, is the real process at the heart of the story.

The one bit of drag is the amount of time consumed by Robin's emotional scrabble as she tries to piece together a marriage that was known to be a poor match about three books ago. Why the wasted time and energy is allowed to plod along ... oh well, I guess that's what makes a story. Sometimes.

The authenticity of these characters in their speech, thoughts and actions is just as fascinating as it has been from the first book. In fact, now that the investigation business is gaining traction, so is the confidence of the characters in who they are as people.

This bodes well for future offerings in this series. So does an interesting new character, a struggling combat veteran hired by Strike to help cover the increased business, who so far has only a limited presence in the story.

Albeit the one red flag in the saga of the increasing attraction between Robin and Strike. If ever a romance will almost certainly spell the end of a good friendship, this would be it - so I am hoping we'll be learning of other, better choices for each. Neither seems to be very good at selecting lasting mates for themselves, though, a symptom of many great detective stories since Sam Spade. It's a poignant shadow that two people who are so good at unraveling the mysteries of other people's lives are so poor at understanding their own.

Also consistent with the prior Strike episodes was that, when it is finally unearthed, the motive is improbable and downright cartoonish. The elements of the crime are numerous, intricate, and didn't really make any sense to me. None of that matters, though, as the crime and the motive are just Hitchcock's McGuffin, the thing that has no importance in and of itself other than how the characters behave in relation to it.

For what it is worth, I very much like the cover illustration. The two main characters doggedly making their way into the mists of the great city of London reflects the "showing up every day" that makes the stories so relatable and alive.

And there is some good news of plans for at least 5 more Cormoran Strike novels, and a television series (perhaps already released in the UK). Looking forward eagerly to each new release!

5 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • In the Name of the Children

  • An FBI Agent's Relentless Pursuit of the Nation's Worst Predators
  • By: Jeffrey L. Rinek, Marilee Strong
  • Narrated by: P. J. Ochlan
  • Length: 13 hrs and 10 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 163
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 146
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 145

In the Name of the Children gives an unflinching look at what it's like to fight a never-ending battle against an enemy far more insidious than terrorists: the predators, lurking amongst us, who seek to harm our children. During his 30-year career with the FBI, Jeff Rinek worked hundreds of investigations involving crimes against children: from stranger abduction to serial homicide to ritualized sexual abuse. Those who do this kind of work are required to plumb the depths of human depravity, to see things no one should ever have to see - and once seen can never forget.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Rollercoaster of emotions

  • By G. Haas on 08-06-18

You might be different after this book

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-18-18

Wow. Especially if you are an ordinary civilian without exposure to this branch of criminality, you might be a somewhat different person after finishing this book.

Be aware that although author Jeff Rinek handles the rougher parts in a compassionate and sensitive way, he doesn't flinch from the brutality of these crimes, touching almost every trigger. I don't complain that he shared the painful details of what happened to the victims, as it is important to understand just what did happen in order to evaluate the effort put into the investigation, the later consequences to both perpetrators and victims, and the importance of the movement to protect children from human predators. Although it may be more than some want to know or are prepared to handle, nonetheless we never seem to run short of the kind of people who treat the most precious, innocent and defenseless members of our society in appalling ways. Some of these perpetrators are predatory strangers, but some are the children's own parents.

Rinek presents these cases a bit differently from some of the other ex-FBI true crime authors. He looks less at the overview and statistical perspective and more at the individuality of each case. Rather than getting the details in summary teaching style, we see the case as the investigation unfolded, following it as this agent remembers each new development.

He does not pull punches when it goes to some of the shortcomings of a few individuals and of the FBI itself, in his eyes. Nor does he stint on praise for the agents and law enforcement personnel he feels regularly work above and beyond the call of duty, on behalf of the children.

The cases are intriguing and engaging. Most of these cases were new to me, even though the chronicle of abuse was worse than any I had heard of before. It is a bit mind-boggling to contemplate just why certain crimes hit the national radar to the point where they become part of the culture, while others that are just as gruesome and riveting, sometimes with even more horrifying details and perpetrators, not to mention child victims, never make it out of the local sandbox, media-wise.

If I could pass one message on to author Jeff Rinek, it is that I hope he continues to find peace, and that these children would like him to think of them not as they died, but as they lived. Who they really were when things were good for them. So that you can think of each of them with a smile, not a heavy heart of grief.

The narrator gets some special commentary for being an odd choice for this particular book. The book shares many of the strong emotions this investigator held and still holds for the victims. It opens with deeply emotional situations, and closes with an account of the author's journey through the depths of sorrow and anger. By contrast, the narrator is a Joe Friday sort with a flat, abrupt, clinical delivery and tone.

This narrator sounds more like a statistics professor than he sounds like the psychologist that is needed here. Descriptions of "developing concern and understanding" and "showing emotional closeness" in interrogations, but delivered in Joe Friday's rat-a-tat-tat voice, were strange to listen to, and muddied the meaning of what the author wanted to say. It was odd, and I felt changed the point of some deeper passages. In some passages the narrator tried hard to layer on emotion. But even an occasional slight quaver in his voice did not overcome his natural flat tone style.

Overall I recommend the book to true-crime fans who are prepared for some terrible details of crimes against children. The crusade to protect children gains new meaning and purpose from the insights in this book.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • If I Can't Have You:

  • Susan Powell, Her Mysterious Disappearance, and the Murder of Her Children
  • By: Gregg Olsen, Rebecca Morris
  • Narrated by: Laural Merlington, Kevin Pierce
  • Length: 10 hrs and 34 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,532
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,420
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,412

The tragic story of Susan Powell and her murdered boys, Charlie and Braden, is the only case that rivals the Jon Benet Ramsey saga in the annals of true crime. When the pretty, blonde Utah mother went missing in December of 2009 the media was swept up in the story - with lenses and microphones trained on Susan's husband, Josh. He said he had no idea what happened to his young wife, and that he and the boys had been camping in the middle of a snowstorm.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The Coward and the Angels

  • By Pulplife on 05-20-14

Creepy, deadly family is all too real

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-15-18

This is not the standard true-crime pulling together of all the stories ever published about the crime(s). Rather, author Gregg Olson has done extensive original research, serious spade-work to unearth the deeper, more horrifying truths behind this tragic story.

But I dinged Olson a star for 'Story', giving a 4 instead of a 5, for what is missing and desperately needed in this narrative. That is, the research into the psychological reasons that help explain why a bright, lovely, energetic and able young woman marries into such a destructively dysfunctional family - and stays, and stays, and stays. And does the dance with her husband and his predatory family, against her own bests interests, and against the best interests of her children as well. There are reasons that victims 'turn Stockholm', as it were, even as they speak out that they do see a grim fate bearing down on them.

Olson tells us everything that happened and many things that are rumored and surmised to have happened, to give a catalog of events that is as complete and well-rounded as is possible from the outside. He's honest about the occasionally incomprehensible actions of his sometimes hard-to-like victim, as she seems complicit in the mind games that threaten both her and her children. What he doesn't do is include the extensive research into this behavior that would help us better understand the victim's point of view.

Even without that, though, this is a great story, and one that is a bit unusual for a bad-husband true-crime book. It may well be a wake-up call for someone who is connected not just to a problematic partner, but to the partner's pernicious family as well.

  • The Wife Between Us

  • By: Greer Hendricks, Sarah Pekkanen
  • Narrated by: Julia Whelan
  • Length: 11 hrs and 13 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 17,981
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16,477
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16,428

When you listen to this audiobook, you will make many assumptions. You will assume you are listening to a story about a jealous ex-wife. You will assume she is obsessed with her replacement - a beautiful, younger woman who is about to marry the man they both love. You will assume you know the anatomy of this tangled love triangle. Assume nothing. Twisted and deliciously chilling, The Wife Between Us exposes the secret complexities of an enviable marriage - and the dangerous truths we ignore in the name of love.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • NOT that confusing! Gone Girl + Last Mrs. Parrish

  • By JK907 on 01-11-18

Well-crafted and a bit intense

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-12-18

Lovely writing. The artistic descriptions of the settings of some of the events added an overall aesthetic tone to an emotionally tense story.

The narrator is a bit more nasal than I prefer, but otherwise does well.

However, I marked the Story rating down to 3 and the Overall rating to 4 because this story has the same basic plot, including 'the big reveal' of the mystery behind the action, as "The Last Mrs. Parrish", which I happened to listen to just before this one. I get it that certain genres and patterns of stories become the fad and with the buying public, but the same plot in each book ... really?? IMO it is a cheat on the buying public to just farm out the same story to different writers and boom, there's your book, stick a price tag on it and sell it. It's a fast track to such old-fashioned publishing sins as "hackneyed" and "stale".

Between "The Last Mrs. Parrish" and "The Wife Between Us" you only need to read one to enjoy the plot (I found that it's not as much fun the second time through, even with a different writer). "Mrs. Parrish" is a little more puckishly entertaining, and "Wife" is more artistic in writing, setting and tone. They have somewhat different endings but that's just the last small bit of the story. Take your pick. That's my opinion. :)

Oh right - I put the same last two para's above in both reviews. Just as the two writers used the same plot. ;)

  • The Last Mrs. Parrish

  • A Novel
  • By: Liv Constantine
  • Narrated by: Suzanne Elise Freeman, Meghan Wolf
  • Length: 12 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,267
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,572
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 7,554

Amber Patterson is fed up. She's tired of being a nobody: a plain, invisible woman who blends into the background. She deserves more - a life of money and power like the one blond-haired, blue-eyed goddess Daphne Parrish takes for granted. To everyone in the exclusive town of Bishops Harbor, Connecticut, Daphne - a socialite and philanthropist - and her real-estate mogul husband, Jackson, are a couple straight out of a fairy tale. Amber's envy could eat her alive...if she didn't have a plan.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Up in the Air

  • By Amazon Customer on 04-05-18

Events as told by different characters intriguing

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-12-18

I very much enjoyed hearing the same set of events narrated by two different characters, who have two very different sets of knowledge about the backstory of those events. And two different perspectives, two different agendas.

The narration is nasal, predictable and draggy, which may be partly a fault of the audio editing rather than the narrator. But she read the story well enough.

However, I marked the Story rating down to 3 and the Overall rating to 4 because this story has the same basic plot, including 'the big reveal' of the mystery behind the action, as "The Wife Between Us", which I happened to listen to just after this one. I get it that certain genres and patterns of stories become the fad and with the buying public, but the same plot in each book ... really?? IMO it is a cheat on the buying public to just farm out the same story to different writers and boom, there's your book, stick a price tag on it and sell it. It's a fast track to such old-fashioned publishing sins as "hackneyed" and "stale".

Between "The Last Mrs. Parrish" and "The Wife Between Us" you only need to read one to enjoy the plot (I found that it's not as much fun the second time through, even with a different writer). "Mrs. Parrish" is a little more puckishly entertaining, and "Wife" is more artistic in writing, setting and tone. They have somewhat different endings but that's just the last small bit of the story. Take your pick. That's my opinion. :)

Oh right - I put the same last two para's above in both reviews. Just as the two writers used the same plot. ;)