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Edie

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  • Hocus Pocus and the All-New Sequel

  • By: Disney Press, A. W. Jantha
  • Narrated by: Eileen Stevens
  • Length: 11 hrs and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 194
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 178
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 178

Shortly after moving to Salem, Massachusetts, Max Dennison finds himself in hot water when he accidentally releases a coven of witches from the afterlife. Max, his sister, and his new friends must find a way to stop the witches from carrying out their evil plan. Twenty-five years later, Max and Allison's 17-year-old daughter, Poppy, finds herself face-to-face with the Sanderson sisters in all their sinister glory. When Halloween celebrations don't quite go as planned, it's a race against time as Poppy and her friends fight to save her family and all of Salem from the witches' latest vile scheme.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • These characters deserved SO much more!

  • By Edie on 08-29-18

These characters deserved SO much more!

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-29-18

I could write my own book about how bad this sequel is. I had the audio book, which only made it more bland and painful.
The first book is simply a written version of the movie script. The narrator lost me when she made Winnie sound more like an anal soccer mom than a witch with her terrible, sing-song-y rendition. I had to stop listening and go to the sequel even before Max summoned the Burning Rain Of Death.
This sequel, with its overly blatant moral high ground would have been better suited for a Disney Channel “best-friend-high-school-movie special.”
Too much focus on the teenage angst and love interest. However, I very much appreciate the fact that the author DIDN’T make a big deal about the main character being gay. Her crush was just her crush, as it should be, so BRAVO.
The witches were basically non-existent. They weren’t mean, or conniving or even entertaining.
The story felt forced.
They waaaaaay over used our favorite parts of the original and failed miserably at trying to make them work.
Sarah’s only presence in the story was to repeat words three times.
A sad attempt at creating a crappy sub-plot for Mary just trails of into nothingness only after being annoying for several paragraphs too long.
Winnifred’s mother was neither evil or powerful. She was a complete joke.
And stop trying to make us feel guilty for being happy about Jay getting left in the cage in 1993. He got what he deserved damn it!!! #teammaxforever
It’s all just tooo saccharine and politically correct. EVERYONE makes up. Everyone decides to be friends. And EVERYONE apologizes for things that aren’t even their fault!
I wish I could give this less than one star.
The BEST part of the entire book was the last few minutes of the last chapter.
I wish they had written THAT story!!!!! It would have been sooooo much better.
For the love of all things Holy, PLEASE don’t let them make THIS into a movie!!!

11 of 12 people found this review helpful

  • If Women Rose Rooted

  • The Journey to Authenticity and Belonging
  • By: Sharon Blackie
  • Narrated by: Heather Wilds
  • Length: 13 hrs and 29 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 132
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 118
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 116

This is the second edition of a uniquely empowering, international word-of-mouth best seller about wild landscapes, female mythology, and the challenges facing modern women. It is a book for any woman who has ever lost her way and who sees a wasteland at the heart of modern existence and longs to live a more authentic, rooted life once again.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Please re-record this incredible book.

  • By Bridy Cappo on 12-25-17

Don’t waste your time!

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-23-18

This book was a complete disappointment. 90% of it is useless blabber. The other 10% is a poor attempt to rip-off of Women Who Run With The Wolves in that The author attempts to use folktales and traditional stories to connect us to our sacred feminine. However she fails miserably. The narrator’s voice is completely monotonous and irritating. This entire book could’ve been paired down to a single chapter and been more useful and more enjoyable. The authors’ personal stories we’re not entertaining nor inspiring or pertinent to the book. It also takes a weird turn to talk about menopause towards the end.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful