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vasilios

perth, australia
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  • Keep Moving

  • And Other Tips and Truths About Aging
  • By: Dick Van Dyke
  • Narrated by: Dick Van Dyke
  • Length: 5 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,617
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,504
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,505

With a fun and folksy way of addressing its audience, Keep Moving serves as an instruction audiobook on how to embrace old age with a positive attitude. The chapters are filled with exclusive personal anecdotes that explore various themes on aging: how to adapt to the physical and social changes, deal with loss of friends and loved ones, stay current, fall in love again, and "keep moving" every day like there's no tomorrow.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I didn't want it to end

  • By Debbie on 10-25-15

Disappointed with aspects of this audiobook.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-08-15

I was disappointed with aspects of this book.While there is no denying Van Dyke's enthusiasm for life and his obvious talent for light musical entertainment, his sharing tends to drift off on tangents that distance the reader and dilute the strong elements of his personal character. For example, his leftist political bias emerges in all its ugliness at moments when it was absolutely unnecessary. His "A" grading of Obama for being black and peddling hope to the masses was one of numerous small- minded gestures. Politics and art are incongruous and best kept separate, unless the intent is to exploit the listener... Elsewhere contradictions and hypocrisies arise such as the claim to be 'clean' while taking sleeping pills continuously over a forty year period doesn't seem pertinent, or a health concern. Strange. Finally, Van Dyke's lack of spiritual growth in the face of his own lifetime was surprising. Clearly he has lived in the material world and found comfort there but one might expect a certain spiritual wisdom that comes from old age and a career in arts related fields... a sense of the deeper beauty and sacredness... Not a Malibu thing perhaps...

111 of 271 people found this review helpful

  • The Language of Life

  • By: Sekou Sundiata, Naomi Shihab Nye, Bill Moyers
  • Narrated by: Sekou Sundiata, Naomi Shihab Nye
  • Length: 8 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 50
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 24
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 24

In a series of fascinating conversations with eighteen American poets, and in dozens of poems, The Language of Life celebrates language in its "most exalted, wrenching, delighted, and concentrated form," and its unique power to recreate the human experience: falling in love, facing death, leaving home, losing faith, finding God.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Life-changing

  • By Deanna O'Shaughnessy on 11-19-04

Politics and art are a bad mix

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-19-15

The title deceived me. I thought it was about life in the broadest sense but this collection of brief interactions with so-called minority and feminist poets and samples of their work was heavily biased toward a minority anti-American, anti-White, narrowed perspective of poetry and art... I am not american and was looking for poetry with more transcendent qualities, able to get beyond surface preoccupations... If this collection represents the best of American poetry then the art is in trouble of being underwhelmed by mediocrity... Bill movers didn't challenge these political ideologues enough because just wanted his show done and dusted, it seems... Disappointing in the extreme...

1 of 13 people found this review helpful

  • Out of Our Minds

  • Learning to Be Creative
  • By: Ken Robinson
  • Narrated by: John Lee
  • Length: 10 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 281
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 241
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 240

There is a paradox. As children, most of us think we are highly creative; as adults many of us think we are not. What changes as children grow up? Organizations across the globe are competing in a world that is changing faster than ever. They say they need people who can think creatively, who are flexible and quick to adapt.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Needs a different narrator

  • By Kathryn on 02-03-14

Disappointing

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-04-13

Would you try another book from Ken Robinson and/or John Lee?

I would think twice about trying another book by either the author and/or the reader. The content was too lightweight and general and the reading did not capture the spirit of the author, his style, or humour.

How did the narrator detract from the book?

The narrator mispronounced too many words and also misunderstood the rhythm and stress of the author's speech style.

Do you think Out of Our Minds needs a follow-up book? Why or why not?

No, I'm afraid the content was too general to be engaging. It took a long time to develop towards the deeper ideas that emerged towards the latter sections of the book. Too much trivia and google-search facts in the early stages.

Any additional comments?

Quite frustrating if you appreciate that creativity is a serious topic that can be explored at depth. This was a popularised conception that actually clouded the subject as much as shed light on it. A missed opportunity at so many levels.

3 of 5 people found this review helpful