LISTENER

Blue Dragonfly

  • 118
  • reviews
  • 655
  • helpful votes
  • 210
  • ratings
  • Savage Harvest

  • A Tale of Cannibals, Colonialism, and Michael Rockefeller's Tragic Quest for Primitive Art
  • By: Carl Hoffman
  • Narrated by: Joe Barrett
  • Length: 9 hrs and 18 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 213
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 184
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 185

The mysterious disappearance of Michael Rockefeller in remote New Guinea in 1961 has kept the world, and even Michael's powerful, influential family, guessing for years. Now, Carl Hoffman uncovers startling new evidence that finally tells the full, astonishing story.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 'Safe Return Doubtful'

  • By Mel on 03-30-14

Gruesome beginning

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-12-19

I had heard an interview with the author and thought his story would be fascinating. I remember when Michael Rockefeller disappeared and the extensive search for him that turned up no clues at the time. However, the graphic and gruesome beginning giving the description of Michael's slaughter was more than I could handle and I just couldn't go on with this book. I couldn't help but wonder how his family reacted to this graphic description of his demise. I realize it is about a culture so much different than ours that it is incomprehensible. However, I can't help but think that the author could have handled it in a less extensive and graphic fashion.

  • Verses for the Dead

  • A Pendergast Novel
  • By: Douglas Preston, Lincoln Child
  • Narrated by: Rene Auberjonois
  • Length: 10 hrs and 33 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,151
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 1,065
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,060

After an overhaul of leadership at the FBI's New York field office, A. X. L. Pendergast is abruptly forced to accept an unthinkable condition of continued employment: the famously rogue agent must now work with a partner. Pendergast and his new teammate, junior agent Coldmoon, are assigned to Miami Beach, where a rash of killings by a bloodthirsty psychopath are distinguished by a confounding M.O.: cutting out the hearts of his victims and leaving them - along with cryptic handwritten letters - at local gravestones, unconnected save in one bizarre way.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Completely Absorbing Pendergast novel...

  • By shelley on 01-01-19

Finally a good one again!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-12-19

It's been awhile since I enjoyed a Pendergast novel and it kept my interest all the way through. I liked all the twists and turns and how they wrapped it up at the end. Coldmoon is a interesting new character and Pendergast is back to his enigmatic self, solving bizarre crimes. Well paced, lots of surprises, lots of action and some creepy settings. Though I missed D'Agosta I really enjoyed the back and forth with Pendergast and his new partner. Delightful that a "new" Smithback has entered the scene and the female medical examiner was a plus, too. All in all a fun listen and I'm looking forward to more of the same in the future. So nice not to have to deal with the angst from Constance in this one, too.

  • Past Tense

  • A Jack Reacher Novel
  • By: Lee Child
  • Narrated by: Scott Brick
  • Length: 12 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,777
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,352
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,324

Jack Reacher hits the pavement and sticks out his thumb. He plans to follow the sun on an epic trip across America, from Maine to California. He doesn't get far. On a country road deep in the New England woods, he sees a sign to a place he has never been: the town where his father was born. He thinks, What's one extra day? He takes the detour. 

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • FIVE STAR BOOK And NARRATION!!!!

  • By shelley on 11-05-18

No more Jack Reacher for me

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-24-18

The Jack Reacher series has really gone down hill the last few books, but to give Lee Child the benefit of the doubt I thought I'd try one more. This one was truly awful! After reading the reviews, I decided to stick with it until the end and I found it really tedious, meandering and ugly. The only part I enjoyed was Scott Brick's narration. Reacher has really become the anti-hero. The brutality in this book was horrible. The story was really boring until the bitter end and then it was so predictable. How many times have writers used the "human prey" story line? Too many, I'm sure. I often think that the best Jack Reacher books were his connection to the military. Perhaps, Lee Child might do better by going back and writing books about his military days? The wandering 'hobo" story line is getting old. The character doesn't seem like the heroic bystander who is in the right place at the right time, anymore. More like a guy who enjoys getting himself in the middle of trouble so he can do mayhem. Yawn and Yuck!

  • Shadow Tyrants

  • The Oregon Files Series, Book 13
  • By: Clive Cussler, Boyd Morrison
  • Narrated by: Scott Brick
  • Length: 10 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,371
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 1,280
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,271

Nearly 2,000 years ago, an Eastern emperor charged a small group with safeguarding secrets powerful enough to change the history of mankind. They went down in legend as the Nine Unknown Men - and now two rival factions of their descendants are fighting a mighty battle. Both sides think they are saving the world, but their tactics could very well bring about the end of humankind. Soon, Juan Cabrillo and his team of expert operatives aboard the Oregon find themselves trapped between two adversaries, both of whom are willing to use shocking means to accomplish their goals. 

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Overall, this was a pretty average book.

  • By Samuel on 09-18-18

Getting too formulaic

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-30-18

I have always loved the Oregon Files books, however they are just getting a bit too formulaic. Scott Brick is great as the narrator, as usual. And I love the actual Oregon crew characters. But the story was boring to me because I felt I was listening to the same old story with only different evil geniuses and locations. I got bored about half way through and am going. to return it.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Dark Tide Rising

  • By: Anne Perry
  • Narrated by: David Colacci
  • Length: 11 hrs and 55 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 131
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 112
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 112

Harry Exeter doesn't want the aid of the Thames River Police in tracking down the men who kidnapped his wife, Kate. He only asks them to help him navigate Jacob's Island, a creepy mass of decrepit buildings where he will hand off a large sum of money in exchange for her life. But when they arrive at the meeting place, Commander Monk and five of his best men are attacked from all sides, and Monk is left wondering who could have given away their plans. As Monk follows leads, it seems inevitable one of his own men has betrayed him. 

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • One of Anne Perry's best stories.

  • By Anonymous User on 10-07-18

Wow, caught me by surprise, sort of

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-27-18

I love the Monk series and there has been only one I didn't care for (when Hester got kidnapped). So, for the first half or more of this book I thought, "Oh no, Anne Perry is going by the way of so many of my favorite authors and giving it half an effort. It seemed to drag. I guessed who the guilty person was almost at the beginning because it seemed so obvious to me. I thought, "Monk's is losing his unique intuition that he doesn't see this clearly". Well, as the book progressed and I was just about to turn it off out of frustration and a bit of boredom, it suddenly became very intriguing. So, Anne Perry did it again. This time in leading us astray and then presenting a surprising ending. And, oh yes, we get to see more of Hooper, a character of which I have grown fond. Hang in there if you feel like I did at the first half. It is worth it.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • World Without End

  • By: Ken Follett
  • Narrated by: John Lee
  • Length: 45 hrs and 32 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 15,492
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 9,431
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,441

In 1989 Ken Follett astonished the literary world with The Pillars of the Earth, set in 12th-century England. Readers and listeners ever since have hoped for a sequel. At last, here it is. Although the two novels may be listened to in any order, World Without End also takes place in Kingsbridge, two centuries after the townspeople finished building their exquisite Gothic cathedral. The cathedral is again at the center of a web of love and hate, greed and pride, ambition and revenge.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 40 hours too short ...

  • By Henrik on 11-03-07

Timeless Masterpiece

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-06-18

I read Ken Folletts "Pillars of the Earth" and "World Without End" many years ago when they first came out and loved every minute of the stories. Recently I thought it would be interesting to listen to them on audio and see if they still had the same impact on me as they did originally. John Lee's narration brought the story alive. It was like revisiting old friends. The stories are an amazing history with unforgettable characters. I have to say these books are my favorites of all time. Ken Follett's beautifully crafted story keeps one's interest all the way through and I was almost sad when it ended. Though I'm not one who is religious in any way, the unfolding of the power struggles between the church and the state, at the time, is so revealing and illustrates how the common people get caught in the middle of their squabbles for power. The personal struggles of the people and their desire for choices in their lives are touching and even relevant to the world today. I highly recommend this book.

  • The Pharaoh Key

  • By: Douglas Preston, Lincoln Child
  • Narrated by: David W. Collins
  • Length: 9 hrs and 12 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,420
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,291
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,289

Gideon Crew - brilliant scientist, master thief, intrepid adventurer - is shocked when his former employer, Eli Glinn, vanishes without a trace, and Glinn's high-tech lab Effective Engineering Solutions shuts down seemingly overnight. Fresh off a diagnosis that gives him only months to live, Crew is contacted by one of his former coworkers at EES, Manuel Garza, who has a bead on one final treasure hinted at in EES's final case, the long-awaited translation of a centuries-old stone tablet of a previously undiscovered civilization: The Phaistos Disc.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • I wanted to love it...

  • By Steve Manke on 06-15-18

Excruciating

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-20-18

Preston and Child are my favorite writers. Unfortunately, they seem to be running out of stories that are entertaining. I guess that isn't surprising considering their long career and so many really great books in the past. I seem to be returning quite a few of their books lately, which is disappointing. This is so bad that I couldn't listen to anymore beyond their discussion with the camel sellers. Frankly, up to that point the story is boring, the characters are not likable and the story drags. The narrator drones. I'm hoping Preston/Child will recharge and get back to their great story writing.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • A Column of Fire

  • By: Ken Follett
  • Narrated by: John Lee
  • Length: 30 hrs and 19 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,832
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 8,061
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,035

In 1558 the ancient stones of Kingsbridge Cathedral look down on a city torn apart by religious conflict. As power in England shifts precariously between Catholics and Protestants, high principles clash bloodily with friendship, loyalty, and love. Ned Willard wants nothing more than to marry Margery Fitzgerald. But when the lovers find themselves on opposing sides of the religious divide sweeping across the country, Ned goes to work for Princess Elizabeth. When she becomes queen, all Europe turns against England.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Follett is a Master Storyteller

  • By Charles Atkinson on 10-11-17

Uninspired

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-06-18

Two of my favorite books of all time are Ken Follet's "Pillars of the Earth" and "World Without End". So I was excited to hear that he had written another sequel. However, it really falls short of the first two in my opinion. I really connected with the characters in the first two, but found the ones in this book rather one dimensional and I really couldn't feel any connection to them. As usual, Mr. Follett's historical research is excellent, though. I've gotten more than half way through and have decided not to finish it. I have found it boring and ponderous. I keep feeling that he wasn't really as inspired in his writing as he was in the first two novels. Certainly it is a real glimpse into the religious intolerance that still continues to this day and how politically oriented it all is. But without characters one can feel something for it seems almost like a school history book.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Ararat

  • By: Christopher Golden
  • Narrated by: Robert Fass
  • Length: 10 hrs and 10 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 604
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 553
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 550

Christopher Golden's Ararat is the heart-pounding tale of an adventure that goes wrong - on a biblical scale. When an earthquake reveals a secret cave hidden inside Mount Ararat in Turkey, a daring, newly engaged couple are determined to be the first ones inside...and what they discover will change everything. The cave is actually a buried ancient ship that many quickly come to believe is Noah's Ark. When a team of scholars, archaeologists, and filmmakers make it inside the ark, they discover an elaborate coffin in its recesses.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Pretty good story

  • By Shaymus on 10-19-17

Horrible characters

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-01-18

I really tried to like this, but the characters were so obnoxious or just plain weak that I didn't care what they were doing or what happened to them. The story drags on without getting anywhere interesting. I just had to give up about half way through because it just seemed to be a story about unappealing people who just got worse as it went along.

  • The Pillars of the Earth

  • By: Ken Follett
  • Narrated by: John Lee
  • Length: 40 hrs and 55 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 24,582
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16,087
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16,128

The Pillars of the Earth tells the story of Philip, prior of Kingsbridge, a devout and resourceful monk driven to build the greatest Gothic cathedral the world has known...of Tom, the mason who becomes his architect - a man divided in his soul...of the beautiful, elusive Lady Aliena, haunted by a secret shame...and of a struggle between good and evil that will turn church against state, and brother against brother.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Epic story to be read by all!

  • By Gina on 07-25-09

My All Time Favorite Book

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-19-18

I read "Pillars of the Earth" when it first came out and loved it. So, it was like visiting an old friend to listen to it on Audible. It is such a broad, encompassing story that it is hard to review. For me, there is so much to this historical novel that it is hard to pinpoint what I love the most about it. First, the narration is wonderful. All the characters, whether you love or hate them, are characterized magnificently. Every time I read or listen to this book there is a new revelation to me, which makes it a timeless classic. There is such a variation in the characters. Even though the villains are despicable, you can also understand them. None of the characters are black and white, but presented in various shades of gray. The entire story is multi-dimensional. It is not predictable in any way. Though I am not a religious person, the religious history is fascinating because the story makes it easy to see the historical perspective of the common people being totally under the control of the Church and the Aristocracy. Though there are dark and heart wrenching episodes in the book, it is also very uplifting. You can feel the joy of those who are breaking out of the status quo of the times and doing something unique and different. It is a long book, but also one in which I felt a loss when it ended. I cannot recommend it highly enough. Ken Follett has written a book that has gone down in history as one of the top novels ever written. I like historical fiction and non fiction because no matter what things are like presently one can see how much the world has gotten better over time.