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A.Singer

  • 8
  • reviews
  • 103
  • helpful votes
  • 122
  • ratings
  • Intro to Indoor Cycling

  • By: Aaptiv
  • Narrated by: Ed Hall
  • Length: 6 hrs and 25 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 10
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 8
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 7

Join certified cycling instructor and Aaptiv trainer Ed Hall and take indoor cycling for a spin whether you’re brand new to the bike or looking for a form refresher.  

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Great idea, music is too loud

  • By A.Singer on 08-30-18

Great idea, music is too loud

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-30-18

I am very much motivated to move by music and I often listen to music for a workout that I wouldn't listen to for pleasure because I really like the music to have drive the workout. I even listen pretty loud, but there's no voice trying to talk to me at the same time (except for the one in my head that shouts "move! keep going! don't stop!"

But I have a real problem with these audio workouts. I really want to love them because I think it's a great idea, however, the music volume compared to the trainer's voice is just too loud. The voice can be lost in the music. If I turn up the volume to hear more of the voice, I get even louder music. It actually started making me anxious and irritated and I finally just had to turn it off.

Second, I think the fact that they are using music that has lyrics makes this problem worse. The song lyrics clash with the trainer's voice. It might be okay if the music wasn't so loud compared to the trainer's voice but this just isn't a good sound mix for me.

I'm sure there are people who will think the balance of music to trainer's voice is fine, and these audio workouts are for them. But as much as I want to love these and actually could really, really use this right now with my working out, it just doesn't work for me.

That said, I think this is a very useful idea and I did like the guy's voice (though the music made it hard to hear) and I think he's pretty good at motivating and inspiring someone to ride. Just gotta be able to lower the volume of that music a bit!

103 of 105 people found this review helpful

  • The Daughter of Sherlock Holmes

  • A Novel
  • By: Leonard Goldberg
  • Narrated by: Steve West
  • Length: 9 hrs and 36 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,443
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,325
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,328

England, 1914. Joanna Blalock's keen mind and incredible insight lead her to become a highly skilled nurse, one of the few professions that allow her to use her finely tuned brain. But when she and her 10-year-old son witness a man fall to his death, apparently by suicide, they are visited by the elderly Dr. John Watson and his charming, handsome son, Dr. John Watson Jr. Impressed by her forensic skills, they invite her to become the third member of their investigative team.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Sherlock stories continue!

  • By Marty Reed on 07-20-17

Trying to hard

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-29-18

What did you like best about The Daughter of Sherlock Holmes? What did you like least?

I love the idea of Sherlock Holme's having left behind a daughter. I could hardly bear listening to "her" though. So snooty and overdone.

What was one of the most memorable moments of The Daughter of Sherlock Holmes?

Perhaps the revealing of who her mother was.

What three words best describe Steve West’s voice?

Nasal, snooty, overdone.

Could you see The Daughter of Sherlock Holmes being made into a movie or a TV series? Who should the stars be?

Nope! The plot would have to be less obvious and the daughter more down to earth and less snooty.

Any additional comments?

I had high hopes for this book even though I'd read some comments beforehand that indicated the same things I observed and didn't care for. I've been listening to the Sherlock Holme's anthology from Steven Fry (excellent) and The Daughter of Sherlock Holmes came across my radar. I thought it might make for an entertaining pause from the anthology - not because I needed a pause, but it just seem to fit, as something fun.

I think I just really wanted there to be a daughter of Sherlock but if there was, I don't think the woman portrayed in this book would be her. She is beyond proper in her speaking and just so snooty and overdone and condescending at times. I find her fairly unbelievable. I think she could have had a softer side and even just not been so "right" and proper about everything all the time. The author tried so hard to make her into her father's offspring. And the periodic reminders that she is Sherlock Holme's daughter were tiring.

I don't know if this woman would come across with such airs if I read the book myself or if it was more about West's portrayal of her but honestly, I became exhausted with her voice - and with the same kind of snootiness that was given to some of the other voices too. Finally I stopped listening and I started Lilliam Boxfish Takes a Walk. What a relief! Seriously, I was so glad not be listening to "the daughter". But I had made up my mind that I would finish The Daughter of Sherlock Holmes and so today I am back to it (after taking a long walk with Lillian and loving ever moment of it). That voice is grating on me immediately but I guess I feel obligated to listen to the whole thing if I'm going to leave a not-so-good review, just to be sure. I'm on chapter 19 of 25 though, so I doubt I'll like it any better by the end. At least I'll know for sure.

Some people may really enjoy this story, and I really want to, but...aside from the character protrayal driving me nuts, the writing is pretty good but it doesn't come close to Doyle's ability to spin a mysterious crime tale.

I'd planned to buy a copy of the printed book for my shelf but I'm going to skip this one, and the sequel.

  • The Once and Future King

  • By: T. H. White
  • Narrated by: Neville Jason
  • Length: 33 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 3,644
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,238
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 3,240

The complete "box set" of T. H. White's epic fantasy novel of the Arthurian legend. The novel is made up of five parts: "The Sword in the Stone", "The Witch in the Wood", "The Ill-Made Knight", "The Candle in the Wind", and "The Book of Merlyn".

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • My favorite book this year.

  • By Robert on 12-13-12

Fun if you're into the genre

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-08-15

What did you love best about The Once and Future King?

Neville Jason's reading is amazing. He truly brings the characters and stories to life.

What does Neville Jason bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

He does really great character voices. Honestly, it's long and at times I was losing interest but Neville's voice would catch my attention and I'd keep going.

Any additional comments?

Lots of fun details that I'd never heard about King Arthur, Merlin and other well known characters. I have never studied these legends so these things may be well known to others who have, but I found it interesting and engaging much of the time. It's also quite long and detailed and at times I felt like I'd had enough. That said, I'm glad to have listened.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Bending the Boyne

  • A Novel of Ancient Ireland
  • By: J. S. Dunn
  • Narrated by: Tim Gerard Reynolds
  • Length: 13 hrs and 26 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 44
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 41
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 41

Circa 2200 BCE: Changes rocking the Continent reach Eire with the dawning Bronze Age. Well before any Celts, marauders invade the island seeking copper and gold. The young astronomer Boann and the enigmatic Cian need all their wits and courage to save their people and their great Boyne mounds, when long bronze knives challenge the peaceful native starwatchers. Banished to far coasts, Cian discovers how to outwit the invaders at their own game. Tensions on Eire between new and old cultures and between Boann, Elcmar, and her son Aengus, ultimately explode.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Bending the Boyne

  • By Gail on 10-25-15

Lots of info but a dry story/reading

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-20-15

Would you listen to Bending the Boyne again? Why?

No. I barely hung in there to listen to it one time. I found the reading and the story dry and fairly lifeless. Maybe that is because the last couple audiobooks I listened to were particularly well read with good character voices and voice inflection where I'd expect it, and Reynold's reading had neither. I found his voice especially hard to relate to when he read female dialog.

The story itself is chocked full of detailed history and mythology, but the presentation was more akin to reading a history book than a novel. I don't know if that is the fault of the writer or the reader - or both.

What other book might you compare Bending the Boyne to and why?

none

What three words best describe Tim Gerard Reynolds’s voice?

Dry, lifeless

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

No

Any additional comments?

There is much to be gleaned from the story if you are interested in this kind of history and mythology and the bronze age, but the author really didn't bring the characters or the story he wove to life through his words, and the reader definitely brought little life to it. I did like the many references and descriptions of the stars and astronomy but at times those descriptions were so detailed and long that it became tedious to listen to. This book is more like a textbook than a novel in some ways.

That said, I hung in there and listened to the whole thing, and I adapted to Reynolds dry, droning voice enough to get some level of enjoyment from the story but I would never venture to pick up the book or listen to the audiobook again and I was glad when it was over.

Some people might love the story and the reader. I'm just not one of them.

  • All the Light We Cannot See

  • A Novel
  • By: Anthony Doerr
  • Narrated by: Zach Appelman
  • Length: 16 hrs and 2 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 44,379
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 39,662
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 39,664

Marie-Laure lives with her father in Paris near the Museum of Natural History, where he works as the master of its thousands of locks. When she is six, Marie-Laure goes blind and her father builds a perfect miniature of their neighborhood so she can memorize it by touch and navigate her way home. When she is 12, the Nazis occupy Paris and father and daughter flee to the walled citadel of Saint-Malo, where Marie-Laure’s reclusive great-uncle lives in a tall house by the sea. With them they carry what might be the museum’s most valuable and dangerous jewel.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Afraid to Write a "Less-Than-Positive" Review

  • By Elizabeth on 08-06-14

Well spun story

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-12-15

What did you love best about All the Light We Cannot See?

I'm no book reviewer. I can just say that I really loved this story. I'm not a big fan of WWII stories/movies/themes, but this story definitely drew me because the characters were people I wanted to know. I thought that Doerr really brought them to life and their surroundings and circumstances to life in a way that made me really sit and wonder what it would have been like to have been in France at that time, and even in Germany where some of the other characters were. It evoked a lot of emotion and at one point, a tear or two.

I love the way Marie blossomed into her surroundings through her father's love and tutelage, and how all that he taught her and the way he built her up prepared her for a tough time ahead. I found her to be a realistic and believable character, as well as the others.

I liked when Doerr would describe in the amazing way he can, what was going on at the same time in two or three different settings. Reminded me that in the same moments that I am experiencing life in my own way, another person is experiencing those same moments in their own way - and multiply that by many millions.

There was no point in this story where I started to lose interest.

What was one of the most memorable moments of All the Light We Cannot See?

Hmmm. There were a few, but I'll say when Werner's sister (forgot her name) spoke to Marie and was able to fill in a bit of her brother's life through the one day that Marie spent with him - and when she found out that it was Marie's great grandfather who'd been the guy on the radio that she and Werner listened to as kids.

Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

It brought to life a period of time that I usually just avoid for whatever reason. I just don't care for war stories I guess I would say. But I feel like I experienced a little bit of that time and it piqued my interest to know a little more. It did make me cry a wee bit a couple times.

  • Shalimar the Clown

  • By: Salman Rushdie
  • Narrated by: Aasif Mandvi
  • Length: 18 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 510
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 195
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 191

When Maximilian Ophuls is murdered outside his daughter's home by his Kashmiri Muslim driver, it appears to be a political killing. Ophuls is the former U.S. ambassador to India and America's leading figure in counter-terrorism. But there is much more to Ophuls and his assassin, a mysterious man calling himself "Shalimar the Clown", than meets the eye. One woman is at the center of their shared history, a history of betrayal and deception.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Complex, Exotic, Suspenseful

  • By JOHN on 06-06-09

Didn't know it was sexual and crude

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-02-15

What disappointed you about Shalimar the Clown?

After 33 minutes of listening, I turned it off because I'm not interested in the crude, sexual references ("Do you take it in the ass?") and I can only guess that it continues throughout the book. The description of the book should include the highly sexualized nature of the character, India, and the kind of language that is used. I'm listening to this in my office at work and it's just not something I want coming out of my speakers, plus, it's just not what I was expecting or that I wanted to listen to.

What was your reaction to the ending? (No spoilers please!)

Never got there.

Any additional comments?

There is probably a very good story here and no doubt Salman Rushdie is a talented wordsmith but I had no idea his writing, or at least this book, was sexually explicit. Just not what I was looking for and now my monthly subscription fee has been wasted.

  • The Curious Case of the Clockwork Man

  • Burton & Swinburne, Book 2
  • By: Mark Hodder
  • Narrated by: Gerard Doyle
  • Length: 14 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 695
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 650
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 648

When a clockwork-powered man of brass is found abandoned in Trafalgar Square, Burton and his assistant, the wayward poet Algernon Swinburne, find themselves on the trail of the stolen Garnier Collection - black diamonds rumored to be fragments of the Lemurian Eye of Naga, a meteorite that fell to Earth in prehistoric times. His investigation leads to involvement with the media sensation of the age: the Tichborne Claimant, a man who insists that he's the long lost heir to the cursed Tichborne estate.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Another excellent installment.

  • By Chris - Audible on 04-17-12

Much gorier than Spring-Heeled Jack

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-28-15

Where does The Curious Case of the Clockwork Man rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

I really like this series and will continue to the third book, but Clockwork Man is definitely more graphic - violence and gore. Some of that was a bit much but overall I liked the storyline.

What was one of the most memorable moments of The Curious Case of the Clockwork Man?

When Burton "died". I was bummed for a moment!

Have you listened to any of Gerard Doyle’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

I have heard Gerard Doyle read Spring-Heeled Jack, the first book in the Burton & Swinburne series. He's very good, in my opinion, but I have not heard him read outside of this series.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

No

  • Harsh Cry of the Heron

  • The Last Tale of the Otori
  • By: Lian Hearn
  • Narrated by: Julia Fletcher, Henri Lubatti
  • Length: 19 hrs and 55 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,566
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 711
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 715

16 years of peace and prosperity have passed since Lord Otori Takeo united the Three Countries. Takeo and his beloved consort, Kaede, have three daughters and a happy family life. Their success has attracted the attention of the distant Emperor and his general, the warlord Saga Hideki, who covet the wealth of the Countries. Meanwhile, the violent acts and betrayals of the past will not lie buried, and other secrets will not stay hidden. Everything that Takeo and Kaede have achieved is threatened.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Destroys the happy ending of the trilogy

  • By Elizabeth on 01-20-08

Good story - not the right readers

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-16-14

Would you consider the audio edition of Harsh Cry of the Heron to be better than the print version?

The first three books in the Tales of the Otori series were read by Kevin Gray and Aiko Nakasone. Both were excellent in reading the narration and various character voices, with very good (as far as I could tell) pronunciation of the Japanese words (e.g., names, places). Aiko's voice made the female characters especially come to life because she made them sound very feminine in a way that I would expect from Japanese women of that time. When I started Harsh Cry of the Heron, I was immediately startled by the very different reader voices and never really settled into the characters. To the very end of this book I kept wishing for the original readers. Julia Fletcher (who sounds Irish), and Henri Lubatti are both good readers, but not for this story. Neither voice really suited the topic or the Japanese culture. Obviously I wanted to finish the series because I really enjoyed it as a whole, so I did listen to this final book, and I did enjoy it, but not to the degree that I did the first three books.

The story itself was good with lots of detail and compelling subplots that keep it moving.

Did the narration match the pace of the story?

I'm not sure about the pace of the story - I suppose that was a match. There were times when I really felt that the voice inflection was wrong though. I would not avoid another book by either of these readers, they are both good readers but just not appropriate for this book when compared to the man and woman who read the first three books in the series.