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Apallo

  • 3
  • reviews
  • 10
  • helpful votes
  • 6
  • ratings
  • Signs of Food Allergies Seen at Birth

  • By: Tina Hesman Saey
  • Narrated by: Jamie Renell
  • Length: 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars 1

Some babies are born with immune cells primed to cause food allergies, a new study suggests.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • The research is inconclusive but . . .

  • By Apallo on 05-27-18

The research is inconclusive but . . .

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-27-18

Good information.

Dear Authors,

Please read our story regarding Food Allergies Seen at Birth:

After 28 years, my son Evan still suffers from a true milk allergy, NOT lactose intolerance. If a drop of milk is placed on his wrist, it welts with surface contact. When he swallows cow or goat milk it is highly toxic, with immediate reactions. Soy also was not well tolerated, as strawberry, tomatoes, eggs, watermelon, grapefruit, peanuts, pecans, coconut, etc. He always seemed be vomiting and breaking out in rashes with foods new to him. We didn't always have access to a list of food ingredients. Unfortunately, the vivid allergic reactions happened quite often in restaurants. Hence, we didn't often stay to finish our meals. I don't imagine it was very appetizing for others as well.

That being said, I believe his food allergy is genetic. Our Irish side of the family had the allergies also. I am told many of his cousins (around 30) suffered from the similar foods. They were poor and raised on potatoes and rice. Not much calcium there. I was lucky to find a corn baby formula at the time. Evan was so under weight, I kept him on formula until he was five years old.

I hope some of this information is helpful to someone . . . incase there are any scientist are reading this, perhaps childhood allergies, lack of enzymes, whatever is going on, is inherited. Perhaps allergies skip a generation or so as in our family's case.

If your research studies can determine early in life if these children will be prone to this condition, it would be much appreciated.

Thank you for the information!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Grain Brain

  • The Surprising Truth About Wheat, Carbs, and Sugar - Your Brain's Silent Killers
  • By: David Perlmutter, Kristin Loberg
  • Narrated by: Peter Ganim
  • Length: 9 hrs and 18 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,229
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,713
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,688

Renowned neurologist David Perlmutter, MD, blows the lid off a topic that's been buried in medical literature for far too long: carbs are destroying your brain. And not just unhealthy carbs, but even healthy ones like whole grains can cause dementia, ADHD, anxiety, chronic headaches, depression, and much more.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Family history of Alzheimers? Read this!

  • By Amazon Customer on 09-19-13

Redundant - Too Much Grain Bashing and Rehashing

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-09-18

What would have made Grain Brain better?

There were a few good pages. For example, the specific blood tests that a patient could request from their doctor. There wasn't much science to the book. I wanted to know the ailment, what tests were selected and why, the doctor's interpretation of the test, what steps were followed, how the success was measured. Instead I heard a lot of grain bashing and rehashing.

What could David Perlmutter and Kristin Loberg have done to make this a more enjoyable book for you?

I would have enjoyed a better narrative and less wordy drama. How is it possible for two to write so many books about the ills of grains?

Have you listened to any of Peter Ganim’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

I like Peter Ganim's fiction work. He is very professional.

You didn’t love this book... but did it have any redeeming qualities?

The title is catchy. Grain Brain. I like that.

Any additional comments?

The narrative was too emotional, and a bit didactic. Early on, there was a sentence that really annoyed me. "You've got to be living under a rock if you didn't know that . . ." I stuck it out for a couple of hours but eventually I just couldn't stand listening to it anymore.

9 of 10 people found this review helpful

  • The Bette Davis Club

  • By: Jane Lotter
  • Narrated by: Sue Pitkin, Tessa Marts
  • Length: 11 hrs and 2 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 3,532
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 3,249
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 3,242

The morning of her niece's wedding, Margo Just drinks a double martini and contemplates the many mistakes she's made in her fifty-odd years of life. Spending three decades in love with a wonderful but unattainable man is pretty high up on her list of missteps, as is a long line of unsuccessful love affairs accompanied by a seemingly endless supply of delicious cocktails.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Sharp, Clever and Elegant... and funny as hell!

  • By Charles Atkinson on 01-17-17

Delightful

Overall
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-08-18

The character's point of view is laugh out loud funny! The narrator's voice is right on for the book.