LISTENER

Maggie Hess

  • 71
  • reviews
  • 57
  • helpful votes
  • 109
  • ratings
  • Johnny Cash

  • The Life
  • By: Robert Hilburn
  • Narrated by: Charles Pittard
  • Length: 21 hrs and 42 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 246
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 223
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 221

The definitive, intimate, no-holds-barred biography of Johnny Cash. People don't just listen to Johnny Cash - they believe in him. Although part of his life has been told on film, there are many compelling layers to his story that have remained hidden - until now. Robert Hilburn tells the unvarnished truth about a musical icon whose personal life was far more troubled and his artistry much more profound than even his most devoted fans have realized.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Awesome!

  • By Steven L. on 10-13-15

deep voice makes sense to me

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-21-19

really loving this long read. currently reading. will likely edit this later. a fantastic narrative

  • The Four Agreements

  • By: don Miguel Ruiz
  • Narrated by: Peter Coyote
  • Length: 2 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 18,745
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 15,188
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 15,146

In The Four Agreements, don Miguel Ruiz reveals the source of self-limiting beliefs that rob us of joy and create needless suffering. Based on ancient Toltec wisdom, the The Four Agreements offer a powerful code of conduct that can rapidly transform our lives to a new experience of freedom, true happiness, and love.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Incredible!!!

  • By R. Baker on 05-25-05

A Poetic Listen

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-07-19

The opening of this book reads with the eloquence of a poem. A beautiful image of Light.

  • Never Split the Difference

  • Negotiating as if Your Life Depended on It
  • By: Chris Voss
  • Narrated by: Michael Kramer
  • Length: 8 hrs and 7 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 23,442
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 20,841
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 20,682

After a stint policing the rough streets of Kansas City, Missouri, Chris Voss joined the FBI, where his career as a hostage negotiator brought him face-to-face with a range of criminals, including bank robbers and terrorists. Reaching the pinnacle of his profession, he became the FBI's lead international kidnapping negotiator. Never Split the Difference takes you inside the world of high-stakes negotiations and into Voss' head.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Needs PDF companion file

  • By John L. Pinkowski on 03-07-17

I never knew open ended questions manipulate

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-14-18

But now that I think of it, open ended questions are designed with an end goal in mind. The power of a question really impresses me. I know very little about negotiating, but after reading this I am a little more aware of just what is going on when I talk with another person.

  • White Fragility

  • Why It's so Hard for White People to Talk About Racism
  • By: Robin DiAngelo, Michael Eric Dyson - foreword
  • Narrated by: Amy Landon
  • Length: 6 hrs and 21 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,372
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,210
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 1,196

In this “vital, necessary, and beautiful book” (Michael Eric Dyson), antiracist educator Robin DiAngelo deftly illuminates the phenomenon of white fragility and “allows us to understand racism as a practice not restricted to "bad people" (Claudia Rankine). Referring to the defensive moves that white people make when challenged racially, white fragility is characterized by emotions such as anger, fear, and guilt and by behaviors including argumentation and silence. These behaviors, in turn, function to reinstate white racial equilibrium and prevent meaningful cross-racial dialogue.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Good book but...

  • By Amazon Customer on 08-06-18

We White People Need to Quit Denying our Advantage

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-14-18

Reading White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for White People to Talk about Racism by Robin DiAngelo, wakes me up to the fact that white people are racist if: we refuse to recognize our white advantage, we deny that racial structures exist, and we pretend we do not see race. It is not racist to acknowledge race. Black people are black because they live in a world of different experiences. Denying the blackness of another person is a way of speaking for them, saying our intentions are perfect, and imagining white advantage is natural. Most white people, by refusing to talk about race, by refusing to see race, by refusing that we get ahead in the world because of our whiteness, are being racist by those actions.

What is the answer then for a white person? How can we respond in a good way to racism which exists?

White Humility is the admission that racial structures exist, that we white people are getting ahead because of our whiteness. White Humility is making an active effort to learn, while admitting we white people will never catch up and learn everything about racism.

Robin DiAngelo leads seminars on addressing racism largely to white people. By leading white people in learning and admitting their race, she seems to be adopting white humility, and setting a good example for most of us.

Personally, I have been guilty of living in white skin and claiming that race doesn't matter to me. Even while reading this book, I note that over 80% of teachers are white, that many people don't have a black teacher until college, and I am somehow proud of myself because my first teacher was black, because my fourth grade teacher was black, and because many of my neighbors are black.

I know white people who fought fought for civil rights in the civil rights movement, and I am very glad for these people. But racial injustice has not ended. And self congratulation does nothing to improve the terrible dynamic of racism.

A week or so ago, a group of mediators and I went on a walk under a tree where a man was lynched that my city has dubbed "the resting tree". From appearance, the group consisted of seven white people, one Asian American woman, and zero black people. One of the white people and the Asian woman told about the significance of the oak tree, which is a very pretty tree. I think they recognized that a man was "hung" under the tree, but also it was emphasized that many slaves "rested" under the tree. We were walking in the "black forest" and I have no idea of the root of that name. Later, I went to visit my Mom's best friend, the African griot, who lives nearby, Wilhelminia Banks, and I asked her about the history of the tree. She spoke starkly of the history of the lynchings which occurred under the tree.

I recommend the book White Fragility, especially because it expresses that no white person is exempt of existing in racial structures, and therefore we all must adopt a philosophy of White Humility.

  • Becoming

  • By: Michelle Obama
  • Narrated by: Michelle Obama
  • Length: 19 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 75,164
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 68,504
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 68,112

In her memoir, a work of deep reflection and mesmerizing storytelling, Michelle Obama invites listeners into her world, chronicling the experiences that have shaped her - from her childhood on the South Side of Chicago to her years as an executive balancing the demands of motherhood and work to her time spent at the world's most famous address. With unerring honesty and lively wit, she describes her triumphs and her disappointments, both public and private, telling her full story as she has lived it - in her own words and on her own terms.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Didn't know what I was getting into

  • By Kenneth Woodward on 12-05-18

Particularly Love Her Writing about Writing

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-13-18

Writing about Writing

I have been reading a lengthy memoir by Michelle Obama called Becoming that I think is good writing and also sizable for an author who didn’t do much exploratory writing prior to about age 26. Even then, she just wrote a few reflections in a diary about something she was trying to work out with her then boyfriend, Barack Obama and a lists of aspirations. I read Becoming thinking maybe this book just poured out of her, maybe somehow when Michelle Obama moved with her husband out of the White House, after the end of his term, this is what was left inside of her that needed to be told. Becoming is Michelle’s story, her life story, told in chronological order, an autobiographical works. Her book is already a huge success, and it makes sense for what it is as a literary works, but also as a story that everyone has been dying to hear for a long time. She waited through the presidency of her beloved husband to emerge with her own personal story in the public sphere, and her choice to do that makes perfect planned sense, as does the public’s eagerness to know about her upbringing in the southside of Chicago, her father with MS, and the way that she met and got to know Barack. Her relationship with Barack seems to me so real that sometimes, when I listened to my audio book, I would grow teary eyed to think of her true love for him. The love is so real I can feel it and it is Michelle who is narrating the book, so it is even more visceral to hear it from her tongue. I probably was wrong to vote Green due to pacifism against drone strikes and disagreement with “clean coal” but I was not really aware of this until I heard Michelle’s story.

15 of 28 people found this review helpful

  • The Way the World Ends

  • (Warmer Collection)
  • By: Jess Walter
  • Narrated by: Dan John Miller
  • Length: 1 hr and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 176
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 157
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 157

For three strangers whose paths will cross, the storm hasn’t even reached its peak. Two of them are the kind of climate scientists no one ever listens to in disaster movies. The third, against even icier opposition, has just moved to the Magnolia State to come out. Soon they’ll all be pushed closer to the edge, where the bracing winds of cataclysmic change can be so wildly liberating.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • GREAT STORY NICELY TOLD

  • By Mike Wick on 02-21-19

Syntactically delicious, delightfully written

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-12-18

I love the way this author moves the reader's minds into these fantastic characters, and the ominous end of chapter one, "this isn't the end of the world." Loving the choice to write about Climate Change in short fiction. Happens to be one of my favorite genres to read. Great setting on a campus too, where currently there is so much climate change denial. I really love this one.

  • Controller

  • (Warmer Collection)
  • By: Jesse Kellerman
  • Narrated by: Chris Andrew Ciulla
  • Length: 1 hr and 11 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars 64
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 58
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars 58

It’s the hottest winter on record, but Raymond’s demanding, bedridden mother doesn’t mind. She likes it warm. Lately, however, control over the thermostat has become a nasty struggle. And each morning that she’s still alive is a suffocating new challenge for Raymond. How high can the mercury climb before he boils over?

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Struggled to keep listening

  • By Toni's takes on 12-17-18

I like the performance, especially voice of mother

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-12-18

So I say this periodically. I do tend to rate things high or low. I go extremes in one direction or other. But this is a great story and performance. The awful high temperatures in January ring true, and remind me that is what much of the world has to look forward to or apprehend. I am glad Amazon produced this bold series, and synced them for Audible. Thanks.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • At the Bottom of New Lake

  • (Warmer Collection)
  • By: Sonya Larson
  • Narrated by: Emily Woo Zeller
  • Length: 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 86
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 78
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 79

To Chinese American teenager Chuntao, New Lake is a beautiful haven where she can hunt for treasures once swallowed up by a big flood. But when she’s caught scavenging by her biology teacher, a woman whose own past has been swept away, Chuntao is faced with an imponderable question: Which world was better - the ideal one she never knew or the destroyed one that now belongs to her?

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • couldn't finish it

  • By DS on 12-04-18

Great Story, of era Actually Quite similar to now

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-12-18

It is an interesting concept, how will high school aged students address Climate Change after the main flood of the apocalypse. (I assume these characters are in high school, though they could have just as likely been younger.) Our world as we know it lies at the bottom of New Lake. It's heading that way, and we who are alive in 2018 are to blame, not so much those who make it as living teens in 2050 when our world lies under water. Maybe if we had fewer fur coats and fancy things, our carbon footprint would be smaller and we could last longer?

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Dare to Lead

  • Brave Work. Tough Conversations. Whole Hearts.
  • By: Brené Brown
  • Narrated by: Brené Brown
  • Length: 8 hrs and 10 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 5,903
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 5,248
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,176

Brené Brown has spent the past two decades studying the emotions and experiences that give meaning to our lives, and the past seven years working with transformative leaders and teams spanning the globe. She found that leaders in organizations ranging from small entrepreneurial startups and family-owned businesses to nonprofits, civic organizations, and Fortune 50 companies all ask the same question: How do you cultivate braver, more daring leaders, and how do you embed the value of courage in your culture? This audiobook answers this question.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Brené's Work Has Changed My Life

  • By Maximus on 01-12-19

One of Her Best: Courage Takes Vulnerability.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-06-18

I'm loving this one, Brene. More than most of your books, and I liked them very much.

Now, the section on myth busting is so awesome. Of course, courage takes vulnerability. Of course, everybody who supports others experiences vulnerability. Yes! yes! Yes!

Leadership takes vulnerability. Of course. Leadership, good, true, leadership requires a humble ability to rumble.

Speaking out about ethics and values with influence at stake is absolutely all about vulnerability.

Vulnerability is not at all weakness; it's strength.

In my experience, I have struggled hard with mental illness, especially in the early part of my adulthood. At first, I kept my rumbling out of public sight. Now I even have audio books published (and Amazon books) published on the subject. I am realizing in my life that people look to me as a leader in how to cope with their own mental illnesses and loved ones with mental illness. I never would have gotten to the point of helping others, or even supporting myself compassionately, without rumbling vulnerably.

Thank you, Brene!

  • Unsheltered

  • A Novel
  • By: Barbara Kingsolver
  • Narrated by: Barbara Kingsolver
  • Length: 16 hrs and 38 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,006
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1,838
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,835

Brilliantly executed and compulsively listenable, Unsheltered is the story of two families, in two centuries, who live at the corner of Sixth and Plum, as they navigate the challenges of surviving a world in the throes of major cultural shifts. In this mesmerizing story told in alternating chapters, Willa and Thatcher come to realize that though the future is uncertain, even unnerving, shelter can be found in the bonds of kindred - whether family or friends - and in the strength of the human spirit. 

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Spring for a professional narrator, please!

  • By Gail Dragon on 11-05-18

respectfully covers heavy matter (suicide)

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-05-18

Very well written, as usual. Just because people adore Kingsolver's early works is not reason to insult her late work. The bad reviews are not true. K. is just as amazing as she always was. So glad she produced this novel, and glad to have illumination on mental illness and its subject matter.