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A Face From the Past

Ohio
  • 14
  • reviews
  • 22
  • helpful votes
  • 35
  • ratings
  • Pretty Girls Dancing

  • By: Kylie Brant
  • Narrated by: Luke Daniels, Emily Sutton-Smith, Lauren Ezzo, and others
  • Length: 11 hrs and 24 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,513
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,251
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,246

Years ago, in the town of Saxon Falls, young Kelsey Willard disappeared and was presumed dead. The tragedy left her family with a fractured life - a mother out to numb the pain, a father losing a battle with his own private demons, and a sister desperate for closure. But now another teenage girl has gone missing. It's ripping open old wounds for the Willards, dragging them back into a painful past, and leaving them unprepared for where it will take them next.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Pretty Girls Dancing, Great listen!

  • By Linda on 02-06-18

Finally!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-07-18

I’ve been in a slump lately for good reads, and it was nice to break out of it with this book. It is so rare for me not to figure out a whodunit until this close to the end, so I really enjoyed the mental exercise. Two thumbs up for this one!

  • Gumption

  • Relighting the Torch of Freedom with America's Gutsiest Troublemakers
  • By: Nick Offerman
  • Narrated by: Nick Offerman
  • Length: 11 hrs and 42 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,773
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,514
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,500

The star of Parks and Recreation and author of the New York Times best seller Paddle Your Own Canoe returns with a second book that humorously highlights 21 figures from our nation's history, from her inception to present day - Nick's personal pantheon of "great Americans".

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • It was just ok

  • By Charlie Kapuscinski on 11-10-16

My vote for most vulgar U.S. history ever written

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-14-18

My husband and I were really looking forward to hearing this book. We love non-traditional histories, and this one sounded great. It didn't take us long before we started questioning it, and eventually, it became the first book in years that I've not finished. (I generally give even the worst book a chance to redeem itself.) In retrospect, we both wish we'd turned it off when in the first few pages, the author called the Founding Fathers sons of b******. Or perhaps the linking of Benjamin Franklin to sex toys should have been enough. However, we stuck with it a few more chapters, and instead of getting better, it just became more and more raunchy. It's really sad, as the author sounds - part of the time - as if he has some really interesting stuff. The mixture of erudition and vulgarities had us shaking our heads and wondering if this was a frat house production - a group of history majors get together and see just how disgusting they can make a history book and still get it published as history. My recommendation is to find a different book written by an author who loves history enough to present it without crude non sequiturs. Returning to Audible.

  • The Red Tent

  • By: Anita Diamant
  • Narrated by: Carol Bilger
  • Length: 11 hrs and 50 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 3,572
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,265
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,293

Passionate, earthy, deeply affecting, The Red Tent combines rich storytelling with a valuable contribution to modern fiction: a vibrant new perspective of female life in the age that shaped present day civilization and values.

If you like The Red Tent, try The Harlot by the Side of the Road, a recounting of some of the most startling and explicit writings from The Old Testament.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Very Pleased

  • By John on 04-10-06

This was offensive to me - Audible return!!!

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-13-18

I purchased this fully aware that it was a historical fiction book based on biblical characters. Usually I enjoy books like this, and I definitely understand that there are many fictional moments woven into such stories in order to create a full book from sometimes minor incidents in the Bible. This is, in fact, the first such book I've ever read that I not only disliked, but found appalling. It is a book of character assassination. For instance, in this perversion, Joseph is actually having an affair with Potiphar's wife instead of resisting her advances as the Bible states. Miracles are discounted, stated facts in the Bible are twisted or totally changed, and a person could easily come out of reading this having no respect for any of the known Bible characters mentioned. I find it offensive for an author to use real people in such a bad way. Had this book been written with fictional characters, my rating would have been totally different, but this just reads like an all out campaign of lies. I can't recommend this book for anyone who respects Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, and Joseph and their families.

  • The German Girl

  • A Novel
  • By: Armando Lucas Correa
  • Narrated by: Joy Osmanski
  • Length: 10 hrs and 48 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 426
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 394
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 391

Before everything changed, young Hannah Rosenthal lived a charmed life. But now, in 1939, the streets of Berlin are draped with red, white, and black flags; her family's fine possessions are hauled away; and they are no longer welcome in the places that once felt like home. Hannah and her best friend, Leo Martin, make a pact: Whatever the future has in store for them, they'll meet it together.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Troubling Book

  • By A Face From the Past on 05-26-18

Troubling Book

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-26-18

I'm writing this several weeks after finishing the book, because it is still bothering me. Some of the smaller problems have drifted from my mind, but what remains is troubling. I'm honestly not sure what the target audience is for this book. Much of it reads like the typical pap dished out to the young adult audience these days. You know the sort; the children or teens are amazingly more wise and intelligent than the adults in their lives... In this case, we even have eleven-year-olds talking about becoming engaged, and it's amazing how they are able to outsmart the Nazis. One little guy even develops a plot to force their ship to be able to land, and the adults accept his leadership. Right. However, the last part of the book reads as if aimed at an older group, so I was a bit confused.

However, that's not what bothers me the most - unless it really is aimed at teens. This story is totally obsessed with death, especially murder and suicide. It opens with a little girl debating ways of murdering her parents. I really wish I'd stopped reading it right then. Later, the obsession becomes cyanide poisoning, including a long discourse on why it's such an excellent way to go, and numerous mentions of parent/child murders - both directions. We are also treated to a rather gruesome, detailed description of how such a scene would play out. I'm not a wimp; I read a fair amount of true crime and watch shows like FBI Files, but this is possibly the most uncomfortable I've ever been while reading about a death.

As I said earlier, if this is aimed at an audience the age of the protagonist, it's totally scary. I can't imagine letting young people read something like this, especially in this troubled time, and honestly, this is one of the few books I've ever read that I wish I hadn't.

9 of 10 people found this review helpful

  • Death by Cashmere

  • Seaside Knitters, Book 1
  • By: Sally Goldenbaum
  • Narrated by: Julie McKay
  • Length: 9 hrs and 54 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 229
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 209
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 207

Not long after Isabel "Izzy" Chambers opens up a knitting shop in the sleepy fishing town of Sea Harbor, Massachusetts, a diverse group of women begins congregating each week to form the Seaside Knitters. Izzy raises some eyebrows when she rents the apartment above her shop to Angie Archer, whose reputation for loose behavior and a quick temper has made her unpopular with many locals. But could any of them have wanted her dead? Angie's body is discovered drowned in the harbor, her long red hair tangled like seaweed in a lobster trap.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great first book in a new series

  • By Judith on 03-03-16

Death by Goldenbaum and McKay...

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-14-18

I have little good to say about this read. I was hoping for a cozy little knitting shop mystery, but this just wasn't fun. First, I wonder if the author is actually a knitter. There were many little moments that felt more like she'd hung out in a knitting shop for an afternoon doing basic research then went home and wrote a book. A display of cashmere and cotton mixed? Not likely. A jumble of needles and scissors? Not likely. Just not good scene setting overall. Then there were just stupid things like the former trial lawyer who cleans up the apartment formerly belonging to the murder victim following a destructive break in without the police seeing it. There was just too much of this stuff. And in the end, I realized I didn't even remotely care about any of the characters, which is never a good sign about a book.

Then there was the reader. Julie McKay set some sort of insane record for mis-inflections in a single recording. I wish I'd kept track of them, as it was truly amazing. Once, I heard 3 within 60 seconds or so of reading! Lines like WALNUT bar baffled me momentarily; I didn't know there were so many types of walnuts or ways to serve them. Then I realized it should have been walnut BAR, describing the wood from which the bar was made. If that was the only example, it wouldn't have been a big deal, but this book was rife with them. Where on earth was the producer?

So, I can't really recommend the book or the audiobook either one. There is just so much stuff out there that is a much better use of time.

  • Gone with the Wind

  • By: Margaret Mitchell
  • Narrated by: Linda Stephens
  • Length: 49 hrs and 7 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,710
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 7,196
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 7,220

Winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Literature, Margaret Mitchell's great novel of the South is one of the most popular books ever written. Within six months of its publication in 1936, Gone With the Wind had sold a million copies. To date, it has been translated into 25 languages, and more than 28 million copies have been sold. Here are the characters that have become symbols of passion and desire....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • not to miss audible experience

  • By dallas on 12-08-09

Better with age, but needed a different reader

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-11-18

I decided I needed to read Gone With the Wind for the first time in over 40 years. I had totally forgotten what a nasty little piece of work Scarlet actually was, but with age has come a huge appreciation for the beautiful spirit of Melanie. That was totally lost on me when I was young. I’m truly glad I read it again. However, I would’ve probably enjoyed it a lot more with the different narrator. I really did not appreciate the long pauses at the end of each sentence as well as often in the middle of sentences. There were also some rather strange inflections at times. It was so annoying to me that I took several weeks to read the book instead of my normal total immersion that would have had it finished in 3-4 days. Reader just felt more suited to read a regular romance than an epic novel like this.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Prayer Box

  • A Novel
  • By: Lisa Wingate
  • Narrated by: Xe Sands
  • Length: 9 hrs and 37 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,346
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,237
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,230

When Iola Anne Poole, an old-timer on Hatteras Island, passes away in her bed at ninety-one, the struggling young mother in her rental cottage, Tandi Jo Reese, finds herself charged with the task of cleaning out the rambling Victorian house. Running from a messy, dangerous past, Tandi never expects to find more than a temporary hiding place within Iola's walls, but everything changes with the discovery of eighty-one carefully decorated prayer boxes, one for each year, dating from Iola's youth to her last days.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Hard to understand

  • By S. Rains on 01-08-15

Tough sticking with this one

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-20-18

I barely made it past the first two chapters of this book, but I kept thinking it might have some potential, so I pushed on to the end. The basic story concept is good, but it was terribly difficult to like the protagonist until the very end of the story. She abandons her children for hours on end without so much as a note, then she goes off the deep end when she thinks they might’ve been taken by children’s services. She gets her nerve up to escape an abusive relationship, and from all appearances is back in another one within days. She models numerous bad behaviors to her children, then she gets really upset when they do the same things. There is a deep feud with her sister, but we never really know why. The expected “redemption” arrives near the end of the book, but for me, the misery of the rest of the story just wasn’t worth it. The biggest redeeming value was the pearls of wisdom from Iola. The stars are all for her.

The thing that made it the most difficult to stay with for me was the reader. Nearly every word of the book and everything every character said was pronounced as if the person was on the verge of tears. That really started to grate on my nerves after a while. I could forgive the time she erred and made the cat one-eyed, but making all the characters sound so constantly pathetic was a really poor choice. I strongly recommend listening to the sample before buying the book.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Baggage

  • By: S. G. Redling
  • Narrated by: Amy McFadden
  • Length: 7 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,028
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 935
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 930

Over the years, terrible things keep happening to Anna Ray on February 17. First, there was the childhood trauma she's never been able to speak about. Then, to her horror, her husband killed himself on that date. A year later and a thousand miles away, Anna tries to find solace in the fresh start of a new job in a new place. She takes comfort in her outspoken cousin Jeannie, the confidant and best friend who's there whenever she needs help.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Riveting read!

  • By Amazon Customer on 02-12-16

Suspend belief...

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-06-17

This is the rare audiobook that I am returning. I never found a character in the story that I liked at all, this quest not helped by the main character being a raging alcoholic. In order to buy the storyline, one needs to assume no effective counseling was given to a child that experienced a very traumatic event, and an apparently really lousy lawyer defended the guilty party. Top this off with one character after another making horribly foolish decisions, a consistent theme of the main character despising police officers, who at no point in the story did anything to earn this flagrant disrespect, the confusion with first person perspective jumping from one character to another early in the book without a clear notice, and the ease with which I solved the mystery well before the end of the book... I simply could not like this book, nor can I imagine anyone I could recommend it to. That said, the reader did a fine job with it, despite the poor storyline she was given to work with.

0 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Get Well Soon

  • History’s Worst Plagues and the Heroes Who Fought Them
  • By: Jennifer Wright
  • Narrated by: Gabra Zackman
  • Length: 7 hrs and 44 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,576
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,211
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,192

In 1518, in a small town in Alsace, Frau Troffea began dancing and didn't stop. She danced until she was carried away six days later, and soon 34 more villagers joined her. Then more. In a month more than 400 people had been stricken by the mysterious dancing plague. In late-19th-century England an eccentric gentleman founded the No Nose Club in his gracious townhome - a social club for those who had lost their noses, and other body parts, to the plague of syphilis for which there was then no cure.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Didn't know syphilis could be so fascinating.

  • By Carrie Arnold on 02-09-17

Just the facts, ma'am

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-14-17

This book was both tremendously interesting and a huge disappointment to me, and despite the interesting topic, I will not recommend it. I really enjoyed the history and background of the plagues, and I learned a lot. However, the author also felt it very important to sermonize frequently and at length, and that really spoiled the book for me. Mixing editorial comments through an otherwise nonfiction book results in a confusing mishmash of fact and opinion, and as a reader, I find it unpleasant to have to wade through a book, sorting as I go.

And I'm sorry, but I just can't stir up a lot of pity for "Typhoid Mary." She knew the terms of her release and chose to violate them. That's attempted murder. In my opinion, she got off lightly.

I do wish Mary Roach had written this book instead!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Winter Over

  • By: Matthew Iden
  • Narrated by: Karen Peakes
  • Length: 9 hrs and 16 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,150
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,050
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,046

Each winter the crew at the Shackleton South Pole Research Facility faces nine months of isolation, round-the-clock darkness, and one of the most extreme climates on the planet. For thirty-something mechanical engineer Cass Jennings, Antarctica offers an opportunity to finally escape the guilt of her troubled past and to rebuild her life. But the death of a colleague triggers a series of mysterious incidents that push Cass and the rest of the forty-four-person crew to the limits of their sanity and endurance.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • A psychological thriller

  • By Brian on 02-08-17

Some Incongruities

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-14-17

Not a bad idea for a story, and for a while, it kept me on the edge of my seat. Unfortunately, it ramped up too suddenly into what felt like impossibility. Another problem I had were a few things that were just totally off. "Fat flakes of snow stinging" a person's face? At 60° below zero? Fat flakes of snow don't sting, nor do fat flakes even form when it's that cold – at least not in Ohio at 10° above zero. And why does a character who is carrying an ice pick have to look for a scrap of rebar to pry a door open? It's also difficult to believe that a small group of 40 people living that close together could not know each other very well after several weeks, but well into the winter, there were still encounters between near strangers. When stuff like that happens in the story, it loses its credibility for me. When I see things that are obvious to me that are off, I wonder how many other things that aren't in my personal knowledge base are wrong, and I find myself missing the story thinking about the details. Detail should embellish the story, not detract from it. I actually wonder how editors miss things like that...

I also never understood the mysterious pills. If the author is going to send us after red herrings, they should be explained or have a purpose.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful