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Kacy

Philadelphia
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  • 37
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  • My First Summer in the Sierra

  • By: John Muir
  • Narrated by: Brett Barry
  • Length: 6 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 359
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 316
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 315

It was June of 1869 when John Muir reluctantly accepted a job herding sheep from the central valley of California to the headwaters of the Merced and Tuolumne Rivers, high into the Sierra Nevadas and deep into the Yosemite region. He felt ill equipped for the work, and yet the opportunity thrilled his adventurous spirit. With a notebook tied to his belt, he set out for a summer he would never forget. My First Summer in the Sierra is Muir’s classic account of that extraordinary journey.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Almost every line is quotable

  • By Kacy on 08-30-13

Almost every line is quotable

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-30-13

Would you listen to My First Summer in the Sierra again? Why?

I read this after returning from a backpacking trip in the Sierras, and it was great to hear what was different for a traveler in Muir's time compared to now (not to mention how different it must have been for a risk-taker like Muir compared to me). Muir's writing style is so old-timey and reverent, the story almost sounds like a religious text.

The author refers to plant and animal species, as well as geographic locations, very specifically.

9 of 9 people found this review helpful

  • AWOL on the Appalachian Trail

  • By: David Miller
  • Narrated by: Christopher Lane
  • Length: 10 hrs and 35 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,344
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,909
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,897

In 2003, software engineer David Miller left his job, family, and friends to hike 2,172 miles of the Appalachian Trail. AWOL on the Appalachian Trail is Miller’s account of this thru-hike from Georgia to Maine. Listeners are treated to rich descriptions of the Appalachian Mountains, the isolation and reverie, the inspiration that fueled his quest, and the rewards of taking a less conventional path through life. While this book abounds with introspection and perseverance, it also provides useful passages about hiking gear and planning.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Enjoyable but severely lacking.

  • By Amazon Customer on 07-01-13

Satisfying day-to-day account

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-30-13

If you could sum up AWOL on the Appalachian Trail in three words, what would they be?

With pretty solid writing skills, this author tells a straightforward account of a long-distance trail hike. There is less content spent on the personal growth aspect of his journey than some related authors like Cheryl Strayed (Wild), however the author's limited reflections on personal growth, politics, and relationships are thoughtful and interesting. This book is informative for aspiring AT hikers and entertaining for armchair hiking enthusiasts.

23 of 25 people found this review helpful

  • 127 Hours: Between a Rock and a Hard Place (Movie Tie- In)

  • By: Aron Ralston
  • Narrated by: Aron Ralston
  • Length: 5 hrs and 22 mins
  • Abridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 297
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 264
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 263

Aron Ralston, an experienced twenty-seven-year-old outdoorsman, was on a days solitary hike through a remote and narrow Utah canyon when he dislodged an eight-hundred- pound boulder that crushed his right hand and wrist against the canyon wall. Emerging from the searing pain, Aron found himself completely stuck. No one knew where he was; no one was coming to rescue him. With scant water and food, and a cheap pocketknife his only tool, he eliminated his options one by one.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Audio and book don't match

  • By Amazon Customer on 10-18-17

Better than the movie

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-30-13

If you could sum up 127 Hours: Between a Rock and a Hard Place (Movie Tie- In) in three words, what would they be?

I saw the film and heard some snippets of Ralston's interviews online. This made me wonder why he said he wouldn't avoid this accident if he were to do it over again. This book helped to explain what the experience has done to enrich the author's life. Although the book would do a service to readers by adding some advice on avoiding similar incidents, it's a great story from a standpoint of overcoming adversity, facing fears, "growing" spiritually/intellectually, etc. The book does not, however, provide much advice in terms of "lessons learned." I enjoyed that it was ready by Aron Ralston himself. I always like audio books that are read by their own authors; you can be pretty sure that all the voice inflections are correct interpretations of the author's tone.

5 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • No Shortcuts to the Top

  • Climbing the World's 14 Highest Peaks
  • By: Ed Viesturs, David Roberts
  • Narrated by: Stephen Hoye
  • Length: 12 hrs and 38 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 966
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 702
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 708

For 18 years, Ed Viesturs pursued climbing's holy grail: to stand atop the world's 14 8,000-meter peaks, without the aid of bottled oxygen. But No Shortcuts to the Top is as much about the man who would become the first American to achieve that goal as it is about his stunning quest. As Viesturs recounts the stories of his most harrowing climbs, he reveals a man torn between the flat, safe world he and his loved ones share and the majestic and deadly places where only he can go.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • NO SHORTCUTS

  • By Anatoliy on 04-05-10

Poorly written and read

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-30-13

This book wasn’t for you, but who do you think might enjoy it more?

In my opinion, this book is only valuable for those who want to compile multiple accounts of the 1996 Everest accidents. It is somewhat interesting to compare Viesturs' account of this disaster with others' stories. The writing itself does not describe well the beauty, adventure, or accomplishments of climbing and being outdoors; the only thing it properly illustrates is Viesturs' self-absorption. The reader's incorrect pronunciation of commonly used words, such as "veterinarian," is also annoying.

What could Ed Viesturs and David Roberts have done to make this a more enjoyable book for you?

Mr. Viesturs could have used some more writing help. His experiences and accomplishments are amazing and worth telling, but they're communicated poorly.

Would you be willing to try another one of Stephen Hoye’s performances?

Probably not.

You didn’t love this book... but did it have any redeeming qualities?

It is a significant account of the 1996 Everest disaster, and the author is not the least bit shy about assigning blame. This is interesting to compare to other accounts, such as John Krakauer's book Into Thin Air. Viesturs also references other climbers' books on the incident within his story. That's a good resource.