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Michael Carrato

Williamsville, NY United States
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  • The Diabetes Code

  • Prevent and Reverse Type 2 Diabetes Naturally
  • By: Dr. Jason Fung
  • Narrated by: Dr. Jason Fung
  • Length: 7 hrs and 24 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 663
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 594
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 582

Today, most doctors, dietitians, and even diabetes specialists consider type 2 diabetes to be a chronic and progressive disease - a life sentence with no possibility of parole. But the truth, as Dr. Fung reveals in this paradigm-shifting book, is that type 2 diabetes is reversible. Writing with clear, persuasive language, he explains why conventional treatments that rely on insulin or other blood-glucose-lowering drugs can actually exacerbate the problem, leading to significant weight gain and even heart disease.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • This book could save your life

  • By Michael Carrato on 04-05-18

This book could save your life

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-05-18

Dr. Jason Fung is changing the world one patient at a time. His first book, The Obesity Code, saved my life. Literally. I was a morbidly obese type 2 diabetic with no hope of reversing my fate when I stumbled upon the Obesity Code in July 2017. Nine months later, I am down 90lbs and no longer diabetic. Everything about my health improved since reading Fung's simple yet powerful advice.

This book is just as revolutionary, but focuses more on diabetes rather than obesity -- though Fung illustrates that both of these are just different manifestations if the same underlying disease. if you are living with T2 diabetes, you MUST read this book. You will be amazed at how quickly and effortlessly you can turn your life around. Even if you're NOT diagnosed T2D, your lifestyle may be putting you on a path to this deadly disease -- some estimate that up to 2/3 of the population are prediabetic or worse -- and this book will teach you how to halt that deadly progression.

They say that if it seems too good to be true, it probably is. This is one of those rare and wonderful exceptions to that rule.

51 of 54 people found this review helpful

  • The Obesity Code

  • Unlocking the Secrets of Weight Loss
  • By: Dr. Jason Fung
  • Narrated by: Brian Nishii
  • Length: 10 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,067
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,345
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,268

In this highly listenable and provocative book, Dr. Jason Fung sets out an original, robust theory of obesity that provides startling insights into proper nutrition. In addition to his five basic steps - a set of lifelong habits that will improve your health and control your insulin levels - Dr. Fung explains how to use intermittent fasting to break the cycle of insulin resistance and reach a healthy weight - for good.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • There is a PDF, Folks

  • By Cynthia on 06-27-17

This book literally saved my life

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-18-18

I stumbled upon this book in July, 2017. At the time I was 370 pounds, T2 diabetic, and miserable. 8 months later I am down 100 pound and my H1C has corrected from 8.7 to 5.4 -- i.e. no longer diabetic. These days I feel amazing all the time, razor sharp mental clarity, improved energy, joints, skin, sleep, mood. I no longer crave foods like before, and 8 months into eating this way I have zero diet fatigue -- in fact, I enjoy eating more than I did before!

Looking back, I find it amazing how bad I was before. And all because of poor eating habits.

Dr. Fung lays out the case for why we are fat and how to regain control of our lives. He describes the science in detail, but also presents it in a way that is accessible to the masses, with plenty of crystal clear analogies. If you are dealing with chronic disease, particularly T2D, fatty liver, or obesity, you MUST read this book and give it a try.

I am now a member of a local Facebook group dedicated to helping people learn and adapt to Fung's approach. Just through word of mouth, this group has grown to 1700 members in a year, and has dozens of posts per day from people who have regained control of their health and their lives. And Fung's plan is the foundation.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Good Calories, Bad Calories

  • Fats, Carbs, and the Controversial Science of Diet and Health
  • By: Gary Taubes
  • Narrated by: Mike Chamberlain
  • Length: 25 hrs and 35 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,380
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,208
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,201

For decades we have been taught that fat is bad for us, carbohydrates better, and that the key to a healthy weight is eating less and exercising more. Yet despite this advice, we have seen unprecedented epidemics of obesity and diabetes. Taubes argues that the problem lies in refined carbohydrates, like white flour, easily digested starches, and sugars, and that the key to good health is the kind of calories we take in, not the number.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Bold Explanation of Real Dietary Advice

  • By John on 08-27-12

Taubes will go down as the Galileo of nutrition

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-18-18

Would you listen to Good Calories, Bad Calories again? Why?

I HAVE listened to it again. It is absolutely essential for anyone interested in the history of nutrition and where things went wrong. Nobody living or dead knows more about this history than Taubes, and he presents it all in compelling detail.

What did you like best about this story?

Taubes is analytical and logical, presenting his case with loads of scientific evidence to back his claims. And he not only tells us where we went wrong, but why we went wrong, putting the bad science of the past 50+ years in full historical context.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

It would be impossible, too long and detailed. But worth it.

  • How Not to Die

  • Discover the Foods Scientifically Proven to Prevent and Reverse Disease
  • By: Michael Greger MD, Gene Stone
  • Narrated by: Michael Greger MD
  • Length: 17 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 6,621
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 5,967
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 5,898

From the physician behind the wildly popular website Nutrition Facts, How Not to Die reveals the groundbreaking scientific evidence behind the only diet that can prevent and reverse many of the causes of disease-related death.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A stunningly important book

  • By Being on 12-29-15

Pseudoscientific nonsense

Overall
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-11-18

I only bought this because I was interested in hearing another viewpoint. But this book is a disgrace. it's filled with half truths and exaggerated claims. Listening to Greger narrate, I feel like I'm being sold a used car. That's because he IS selling something. He is selling the same failed ideology that nutritional authorities have been dumping on us for half a century, the ideology that has created worldwide epidemics of debilitating disease. Don't buy this garbage. Listen to a book by Gary Taubes if you want a true scientific picture of diet and human health.

  • Go Set a Watchman

  • A Novel
  • By: Harper Lee
  • Narrated by: Reese Witherspoon
  • Length: 6 hrs and 57 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 13,917
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12,760
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 12,725

An historic literary event: the publication of a newly discovered novel, the earliest known work from Harper Lee, the beloved, best-selling author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning classic To Kill a Mockingbird. Originally written in the mid-1950s, Go Set a Watchman was the novel Harper Lee first submitted to her publishers before To Kill a Mockingbird. Assumed to have been lost, the manuscript was discovered in late 2014.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • To Kill A Mockingbird vs Go Set A Watchman

  • By Sara on 07-15-15

A little meandering, but still great

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-15-15

Everyone is talking about Atticus and some of the things he does. Yes, there were some cringe-worthy moments. But if Mockingbird is the young adult classic novel about racism in the South, then Watchman is the *adult* classic about the same topic. This book is about how we expect our heroes to be super-heroes, God-like flawless creatures who never had a bad thought about anything. Mockingbird is, after all these years, revealed to be an idealistic view of a young child. This makes it no less powerful, because that idealistic Atticus produced Scout and Jem, two who were destined to be leaders in the next phase of the long fight for racial equality.

As Moses could not enter the promised land, Atticus too cannot break the bonds of his upbringing and move past his deeply-ingrained prejudices. Jean Louise, the adult Scout, must come to terms with that, as do we. She is our voice in this novel, rebelling at the human Atticus for not being the God-like Atticus of her youth. We feel the same anger and betrayal.

Heroes often disappoint. In this era of TMZ and Twitter, the people we put on a pedestal, from political leaders to sports figures, are often revealed to be all too human and flawed. And in a sense, that makes this 50-year-old novel surprisingly applicable to today's world. Our heroes are human and we need to accept them with all of their flaws.

The narrative is meandering and sometimes confusing. As others have said, it is not the beautiful finished product that Mockingbird was. That's OK, because the story still resonates as we see these childlike characters of our youth grow up. The chapter where Jean Louis confronts her father is difficult to hear, because we finally hear the real Atticus and his views, but the conflict is so powerful. I listened to it three times. The flaws of the rest of the novel are worth enduring just for that epic confrontation.

Reese Whitherspoon does a great job narrating, with sometimes challenging material. There are times when dialog shifts erratically between speakers, and Reese handles it well, pausing and shifting her voice slightly to indicate the new speaker. And I found her southern accent perfect for Jean Louise.

2 of 13 people found this review helpful

  • The Boys in the Boat

  • Nine Americans and Their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics
  • By: Daniel James Brown
  • Narrated by: Edward Herrmann
  • Length: 14 hrs and 24 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 25,901
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 23,544
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 23,490

Daniel James Brown's robust book tells the story of the University of Washington's 1936 eight-oar crew and their epic quest for an Olympic gold medal, a team that transformed the sport and grabbed the attention of millions of Americans. The sons of loggers, shipyard workers, and farmers, the boys defeated elite rivals first from eastern and British universities and finally the German crew rowing for Adolf Hitler in the Olympic games in Berlin, 1936.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Do you believe in miracles??

  • By Janice on 07-12-13

The perfect audiobook

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-20-14

I have listened to well over a hundred unabridged audiobooks, and I count this one as the best combination of great writing and narration. The story is beautifully written. Brown juxtaposes the beauty of rowing with the turmoil of 30's America (the Depression and Dust Bowl) and the terrifying rise of Hitler. It doesn't matter a bit that we know the ending, because this story is all about the journey: the United States' journey through its worst decade since the Civil War; Germany's descent into madness; and most compellingly, the unimaginably difficult early years of Joe Rantz, one of the heroes of "The Boat" that shocked Hitler and the world.

And Hermann's narration is absolutely perfect. Usually, in the course of listening to an unabridged audio book, I inevitably hear defects in the narration: mispronounced words, mistaken emphasis, etc. But not from Hermann. His voice, tone and pacing are perfect throughout, enhancing the already compelling material. I wish all audiobooks were done so well. (And you can bet I'm going to be looking for more books read by Hermann).

I cannot recommend this book highly enough. I listened to the entire book twice already, and I can envision returning to it again in the future. It's that good.

  • Steve Jobs

  • By: Walter Isaacson
  • Narrated by: Dylan Baker
  • Length: 25 hrs and 19 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 24,251
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 21,381
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 21,344

Based on more than 40 interviews with Jobs conducted over two years—as well as interviews with more than a hundred family members, friends, adversaries, competitors, and colleagues—Walter Isaacson has written a riveting story of the roller-coaster life and searingly intense personality of a creative entrepreneur whose passion for perfection and ferocious drive revolutionized six industries: personal computers, animated movies, music, phones, tablet computing, and digital publishing.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Interesting man

  • By Jeanne on 11-13-11

Fascinating

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-02-11

If you've ever wondered what Steve Jobs was really like, this book is for you. Isaacson's holds nothing back in describing both the genius and the jerk that was Steve Jobs. Overall, despite the brutal honesty regarding Jobs' MANY quirks, I think the book was favorable to Jobs. I came out of it admiring him as a visionary, but also thankful that I never had to work for him.

Steve Jobs is our generation's Walt Disney: a brilliant innovator who beautifully blended art and technology while building some of the most enduring and iconic companies in human history. Other parallels to Disney: they both had complete control over their companies' direction; they were both highly visible spokesmen (even icons) for both the company and the brand; they both left behind a changed world (Disney with animation and theme parks, Jobs with the iPod/iPad/iPhone/Pixar); they were both astute businessmen in addition to being visionaries; both were pioneers in revolutionizing animation in feature films; and of course, sadly, both died too young of cancer. I've also enjoyed Disney biographies, particularly the ones, like this bio, which took an honest look at the flaws as well as the genius.

I am not a huge Apple fan but I loved this book, and I love Steve Jobs; not because of who he was but for what he did. His greatest achievements -- iPod, iPad, iPhone, and Pixar -- were all revolutionary inventions, literally creating something new out of nothing. What would be the state of portable consumer devices today without Jobs? Would we still be using clunky flip phones with atrocious software? Would we have elegant graphical interfaces on our computers or devices?

And what about family films? Would we be taking our kids to see abysmal Disney movies like Treasure Planet, rather than beautiful, inspired, emotional epics like the Toy Story trilogy and Finding Nemo?

Even for those of us who aren't "Apple people" can thank Jobs' vision for pushing our culture in the direction of beauty and quality.

This book highlights Jobs' vital role in all these revolutions. Particularly compelling are how Jobs was able to conquer both the music studios AND Eisner-led Disney in the span of a few short years. The details of those conquests are priceless, and this audiobook is worth it for those two tales alone. I also liked the details of his relationship to Bill Gates, and how it evolved through the years (hint: it was not as contentious as I'd always believed).

But there is also much more. I found myself thinking "what a jerk" one second, and "what a genious" the next -- and then quickly back to "what a jerk" again. He is a study in extremes. I came into this book not knowing WHAT I'd think of Jobs in the end given some of the shocking excerpts in the press. I thought it was a good possibility that I'd hate the guy. But Isaacson effectively shows the humanity behind the insanity, and by the end, I can honestly say I genuinely liked him. I was even a little choked up by his cancer plight. It's so sad that the pre-eminent visionary of our time was taken from us in his prime -- not unlike Walt Disney was taken from us almost 50 years ago.

So I guess in the end, Steve's impeccable taste served him well. In choosing Isaacson and giving him open access to his past, Jobs succeeded in putting out one last perfect product: a lasting image of himself that perfectly demonstrated his humanity, his deep flaws, and his enduring genius. I think he would have loved the result, and I did too.

Dylan Baker's narration is excellent. Baker has a little sarcastic twang that I think is perfect for this man, and for this material. Wise choice.

82 of 89 people found this review helpful

  • American Gods [TV Tie-In]

  • By: Neil Gaiman
  • Narrated by: George Guidall
  • Length: 20 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 9,125
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,763
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,783

Locked behind bars for three years, Shadow did his time, quietly waiting for the day when he could return to Eagle Point, Indiana. A man no longer scared of what tomorrow might bring, all he wanted was to be with Laura, the wife he deeply loved, and start a new life. But just days before his release, Laura and Shadow's best friend are killed in an accident. With his life in pieces and nothing to keep him tethered, Shadow accepts a job from a beguiling stranger he meets on the way home, an enigmatic man who calls himself Mr. Wednesday.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Charming mystery, romance and epic

  • By Jody R. Nathan on 11-26-03

My first Gaiman book, liked it but didn't love it

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-12-11

I had not read any Gaiman before. The story was sprawling and epic, and for the most part I liked it. But I didn't love it... maybe a few too many characters ("gods") and events to digest in an audio book. I found myself drifting often, having to replay large sections.

Guidall's narration is magnificent. I am a big Guildall fan since I listened to the Stephen King Dark Tower series. His character voices are spot on without being over the top, and his tone is always perfect. For some audiobook narrators, even good ones, there are times when it's obvious that the narrator never read the text, or perhaps didn't really understand a sentence when they read it. But never with Guidall. It's as if he's telling the story, not reading it.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Trouble with Physics

  • The Rise of String Theory, The Fall of a Science, and What Comes Next
  • By: Lee Smolin
  • Narrated by: Walter Dixon
  • Length: 14 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 427
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 264
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 267

In this illuminating book, the renowned theoretical physicist Lee Smolin argues that fundamental physics - the search for the laws of nature - is losing its way. Ambitious ideas about extra dimensions, exotic particles, multiple universes, and strings have captured the publics imagination -- and the imagination of experts.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Strings snipped

  • By J B Tipton on 06-06-10

Well done, though a little repetitive at times

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-19-11

I don't know much about the state of Physics research, so I don't know if Smolin's complaints have merit. But in my experience observing the state of science in general, Smolin's complaints resonate.

His main beef is not with string theory *per se*, only with the pervasiveness of string theory in physics research. Sure, he has some problems with the theory itself, mainly that it has grown so large and complex that it is practically unverifiable by experimental means. But more importantly, string theory has become so popular that it has squeezed out practically every other area of research. Smolin advocates that physics departments take on more risk and start investing in more esoteric lines of research. He uses a financial analogy: venture capitalists take on a certain amount of risk KNOWING that they will lose some percentage of their investments, but that some other percentage will win big.

Smolin advocates a similar strategy for physics: more "investment" in riskier lines of research, which have a greater chance of failure, but which can also provide the next great breakthrough. Smolin thinks that too much research is vested in the "safe" string theories, and hence growth (in terms of new theories and new knowledge) has practically stalled for an entire generation of physicists.

He makes a compelling point. Very interesting listen. One complaint though: he occasionally gets repetitive in his arguments. This book could have probably been 1/3 shorter without losing anything.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • How I Killed Pluto and Why It Had It Coming

  • By: Mike Brown
  • Narrated by: Ryan Gesell
  • Length: 7 hrs and 48 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 667
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 488
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 494

The solar system most of us grew up with included nine planets, with Mercury closest to the sun and Pluto at the outer edge. Then, in 2005, astronomer Mike Brown made the discovery of a lifetime: a 10th planet, Eris, slightly bigger than Pluto. But instead of its resulting in one more planet being added to our solar system, Brown's find ignited a firestorm of controversy that riled the usually sedate world of astronomy and launched him into the public eye.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Informative and fun

  • By Rickapolis on 12-21-10

Loved it

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-19-11

This book is about the death of a planet, and the birth of a family. I loved the way Brown juxtaposed his explorations of the universe with his own personal experiences building his family. It works. We see Brown the brilliant astronomer, and Brown the doting husband and father. We also see how those two roles sometimes conflicted, like when the early arrival of his beloved daughter almost jeopardized his planet discoveries.

Nicely read as well. Highly recommended.

5 of 5 people found this review helpful