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Anna

Austin, TX
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  • We Own the Sky

  • By: Luke Allnutt
  • Narrated by: Will M. Watt
  • Length: 9 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 28
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 25
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 26

Rob Coates feels like he's won the lottery of life. There is Anna, his incredible wife, their London townhouse, and, most precious of all, Jack, their son, who makes every day an extraordinary adventure. But when a devastating illness befalls his family, Rob's world begins to unravel. Suddenly finding himself alone, Rob seeks solace in photographing the skyscrapers and clifftops he and his son, Jack, used to visit. And just when it seems that all hope is lost, Rob embarks on the most unforgettable of journeys to find his way back to life and forgiveness.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Heart-wrenching but real and worth it!

  • By Anna on 08-24-18

Heart-wrenching but real and worth it!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-24-18

Simply and strikingly written, this book really delivers in the end. No cheap tricks here, and I loved the ending! I have experienced both loss and cancer in my own life and this book deals with them admirably. This is not a cheap sentimental book and it will cause you to see different perspectives. The character development in the main character was impressive.

Will M. Watt, the narrator, is simply unmatched. I would listen to this guy read tax law or Terms and Conditions. His voice is masculine and emotive, adding another layer to the story. He was able to navigate seamlessly between the voice of a man, woman, and child without compromising at all, and each voice was so unique that I didn't need to be told who was speaking. Remarkably well done.

  • A Dangerous Place

  • Maisie Dobbs Mysteries, Book 11
  • By: Jacqueline Winspear
  • Narrated by: Orlagh Cassidy
  • Length: 9 hrs and 46 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,346
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,221
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,224

Spring 1937. In the four years since she left England, Maisie Dobbs has experienced love, contentment, stability - and the deepest tragedy a woman can endure. Now all she wants is the peace she believes she might find by returning to India. But her sojourn in the hills of Darjeeling is cut short when her stepmother summons her home to England; her aging father, Frankie Dobbs, is not getting any younger.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Reboot or Finale?

  • By Carole T. on 04-06-15

A gripping turnabout in the Maisie adventures.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-21-15

What did you love best about A Dangerous Place?

Maisie Dobbs has morphed finally into a many-dimensioned character in this book. Heartbreak returns to her world again but, instead of the "Keep Calm and Carry On" attitude she employs successfully in previous books, she is really and truly broken. This allows small cracks to be seen in her flawless exterior and her sadness bleeds out into her external behavior and in her ability to perform. While I find her steady personality and predictable comportment to be generally reassuring, I found that I took her much more seriously as a person.

What was one of the most memorable moments of A Dangerous Place?

Maisie deals with some addictions in this book but with a characteristically graceful slant. She desires to lose herself in her sadness but some small part of her is fighting to retain a spark. I found particularly poignant the moments where she is conscious of her addiction and acknowledges her choice in the matter.

Which scene was your favorite?

This entire book is a beautiful, rich scene of Gibraltar that I found myself entirely absorbed in. I enjoyed my vicarious tourism of this strange and vibrant locale. I'm also impressed by the slow sadness and eventual rousing adventure that made up this book.

If you were to make a film of this book, what would the tag line be?

The title says it all! A very apt title, which is a trademark of Winspear's. Not only is Gibraltar a dangerous place, but so is Maisie's emotional state and her view of her future as she herself hangs in the balance.

Any additional comments?

This does not follow the formula of the previous Maisie Dobbs novels, but provides a welcome break from her almost inhuman perfection. I feel that Maisie is on a very real journey that I have taken myself in my life. Some reviewers don't appear to enjoy the break in convention, but it has renewed my interest in this series (not that I ever lost it). I find myself nearly desperate to see where Maisie's story takes her next.

  • The Power of Habit

  • Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business
  • By: Charles Duhigg
  • Narrated by: Mike Chamberlain
  • Length: 10 hrs and 53 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 53,173
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 46,001
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 45,758

In The Power of Habit, award-winning business reporter Charles Duhigg takes us to the thrilling edge of scientific discoveries that explain why habits exist and how they can be changed. Distilling vast amounts of information into engrossing narratives that take us from the boardrooms of Procter & Gamble to the sidelines of the NFL to the front lines of the civil rights movement, Duhigg presents a whole new understanding of human nature and its potential.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Nice! A guide on how to change

  • By Mehra on 04-22-12

Amazing!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-14-15

This book made me reevaluate the way that I think and act entirely. It may be the single biggest "lifehack" I have entertained.

The last few chapters also not only made me cry, but have helped me to see people in a way that is much more patient and compassionate.

Incredible book!

  • The Millionaire Next Door

  • The Surprising Secrets of America's Rich
  • By: Thomas J. Stanley Ph.D., William D. Danko Ph.D.
  • Narrated by: Cotter Smith
  • Length: 8 hrs and 16 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,509
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,229
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,189

Listen to the incredible national best seller that is changing people's lives - and increasing their net worth. Also available:
The Millionaire Mind.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Its OK to drive a Taurus!!

  • By Stephen Dix on 03-30-05

a blueprint for common financial sense

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-15-14

Where does The Millionaire Next Door rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

Financial advice is a dull matter at best, especially for someone who doesn't know much about it. This book had a lot of short stories and anecdotes of grounding advice from those who have made it, and better yet, from those who never will.

What did you like best about this story?

This book has given me a language to solidify what I want and helped to define a financial common sense that I didn't quite understand before.

Which character – as performed by Cotter Smith – was your favorite?

The book contains a lot of what I imagine must have been charts. They were very clearly read, however, and I was able to follow along easily. I found Cotter Smith very easy to pay close attention to.

What’s an idea from the book that you will remember?

High consumption lifestyles are not only undesirable, they are embarrassing. I have wealthy friends in my life that I once envied. Not anymore! I am happier with what I have, more frugal, and more content in the knowledge that those who flaunt their wealth are much more commonly "Big Hat, No Cattle." The story of the gentleman who turned down a Rolls Royce rang particularly true with me.

Any additional comments?

I approach my finances so differently after reading this book. I feel as though I have someone to look up to now, which is harder than it sounds because finances are something that are so rarely discussed.