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  • 18
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  • The Consciousness Instinct

  • Unraveling the Mystery of How the Brain Makes the Mind
  • By: Michael S. Gazzaniga
  • Narrated by: David Colacci
  • Length: 9 hrs and 34 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 40
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 37
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 36

How do neurons turn into minds? The problem of consciousness has gnawed at us for millennia. In the last century there have been massive breakthroughs that have rewritten the science of the brain, and yet the puzzles faced by the ancient Greeks are still present. In The Consciousness Instinct, the neuroscience pioneer Michael S. Gazzaniga puts the latest research in conversation with the history of human thinking about the mind, giving a big-picture view of what science has revealed about consciousness. 

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Consciousness through the lens of Neuroscience

  • By Philomath on 12-01-18

Not recommended

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-19-19

From Wikipedia "Michael S. Gazzaniga is a professor of psychology at the University of California, Santa Barbara, where he heads the new SAGE Center for the Study of the Mind. He is one of the leading researchers in cognitive neuroscience, the study of the neural basis of mind." In his book "The Consciousness Instinct," prof Gazzaniga attempts to explain how the brain (a network of neurons) makes mind (consciousness). Unfortunately, he fails. He makes two major mistakes. First, he makes an analogy to quantum mechanics and the notion of duality, in which elementary particles can be interpreted as either a wave or a particle. He uses a quote by Richard Feynman "I think I can safely say nobody understands quantum mechanics," as justification to say that brain and mind are a type of quantum duality. There is no justification in the physics literature for this assertion. Because it is difficult to understand quantum mechanics, it doesn't mean that one can simply make up physics and call it quantum mechanics. He goes on to state that the chemical reaction that govern the chemistry nonliving things is different than the chemistry that governs living things. This idea of "vitalism" was disproved in the first half of the 19th century. Instead, I recommend "What Is Life?: How Chemistry Becomes Biology", by Addy Pross, "Consciousness and the Brain: Deciphering How the Brain Codes Our Thoughts," by Stanislas Dehaene, and "Consciousness: Confessions of a Romantic Reductionist," by Christof Koch.

5 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • Consciousness and Its Implications

  • By: Daniel N. Robinson, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: Daniel N. Robinson
  • Length: 6 hrs and 7 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 169
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 147
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 147

Consciousness, a unique and perplexing mental state, has been the subject of debate for philosophers and scientists for millennia. And while it is widely agreed within contemporary philosophy that consciousness is a problem whose solutions are likely to determine the fate of any number of other problems, there is no settled position on the ultimate nature of consciousness. This series of 12 penetrating and thought-provoking lectures by an acclaimed teacher and scholar approaches its subject directly and unflinchingly.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The Best

  • By Alexander C. Eustice on 02-14-15

Doesn't know his stuff

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-21-18

a good review of the consequences of consciousness, but when the author gets into what Consciousness is the book completely fails. Especially the chapter on physics. Nost of what the author says is wrong. There is too many examples to get into in a short review.

  • Life

  • The Leading Edge of Evolutionary Biology, Genetics, Anthropology, and Environmental Science
  • By: John Brockman
  • Narrated by: Mike Chamberlain, Antony Ferguson, Jonathan Yen
  • Length: 12 hrs and 37 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 34
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 28
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 28

Scientists' understanding of life is progressing more rapidly than at any point in human history, from the extraordinary decoding of DNA to the controversial emergence of biotechnology. Featuring pioneering biologists, geneticists, physicists, and science writers, Life explains just how far we've come - and takes a brilliantly educated guess at where we're heading.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A remarkable book

  • By PMonaco on 03-06-18

A remarkable book

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-06-18

simply put it is fascinating to hear the conversations between innovators and recognized scientist in the field of Life Sciences. An audiobook is the ideal format for listening to discussions and essays on the thought processes by which these people came up with their ideas and where they expected their fields in life science to go in the future.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Before You Know It

  • The Unconscious Reasons We Do What We Do
  • By: John Bargh PhD
  • Narrated by: George Newbern
  • Length: 11 hrs and 17 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 77
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 67
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 67

For more than three decades, Dr. John Bargh has been responsible for the revolutionary research into the unconscious mind, research that informed best sellers like Blink and Thinking Fast and Slow. Now, in what Dr. John Gottman said "will be the most important and exciting book in psychology that has been written in the past 20 years", Dr. Bargh takes us on an entertaining and enlightening tour of the forces that affect everyday behavior while transforming our understanding of ourselves in profound ways.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • An important, life changing book.

  • By PMonaco on 12-03-17

An important, life changing book.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-03-17

Do we truly understand why we do the things we do? If you aren't sure, then you should listen to or read this book. Dr. Bargh shows through a systematic exploration of many years of scientific discoveries in his lab as well as the in the psychological and neurological sciences that much of our actions are influenced by factors beyond our awareness. He presents a clear picture of how we can become more effective by understanding how these unconscious mechanisms work. For example he shows how unconscious behavior can lead to deadly consequences in law enforcement, and how simple thought procedures can result in fewer violent encounters. It can be a scary thought (as evident by the negative reviews) that much of our behavior is beyond our conscious control. But, if you are willing to go where the scientific evidence takes you, this book can be an excellent guide to improving both the understanding and quality of your life.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • The Great Unknown

  • Seven Journeys to the Frontiers of Science
  • By: Marcus du Sautoy
  • Narrated by: Marcus du Sautoy
  • Length: 14 hrs and 41 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 133
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 117
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 117

Ever since the dawn of civilization, we have been driven by a desire to know - to understand the physical world and the laws of nature. But are there limits to human knowledge? Are some things simply beyond the predictive powers of science? Or are those challenges the next big discovery waiting to happen?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Science Museum in a Book (this is a compliment :)

  • By Mike on 04-26-17

Good overview from the viewpoint of a mathematian

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-03-17

Prof Marcus du Sautoy gives an excellent review of how mathematics can help us understand universe. It is worthwhile hearing the story from the point-of-view of a mathematian. The author traces several important mathematical concepts through history, which is an amazing story. I learned a great deal from the book, and I highly recommend it.

Unfortunately, Prof. du Sautoy is not a physicist and he struggles with his explaination of quantum physics and relativity. For example, he falsely states that General Relativity (GR) is required to describe the motion of an accelerating reference system. GR describes gravity through an equivalence principal that relates gravity to an accelerating reference frame. He also gives a wrong explanation of the so called "twin paradox." Twins who take different paths through spacetime will experience different elapsed times because they change reference frames, not because one twin accelerates at a turnaround point. Both of these errors are common misconceptions. Prof du Sautoy should have asked a physicist to review his book.

  • Reality Is Not What It Seems

  • The Journey to Quantum Gravity
  • By: Carlo Rovelli, Simon Carnell - translator, Erica Segre - translator
  • Narrated by: Roy McMillan
  • Length: 6 hrs and 7 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,052
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 953
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 945

What are time and space made of? Where does matter come from? And what exactly is reality? Theoretical physicist Carlo Rovelli has spent his whole life exploring these questions and pushing the boundaries of what we know. Here he explains how our image of the world has changed over the last few dozen centuries.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Most compelling physics book in at least 10 years!

  • By Kyle on 02-03-17

A thought-provoking book on modern physics

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-02-17

Throughout recorded history people have struggled to understand space and time. The great breakthrough came with Einstein's concept of spacetime. But many unanswered questions remain. Carlo Rovelli does an excellent job of stating the problems and offering solutions. While not 100% successful, Prof. Rovelli offers thought-provoking solutions based on his work in Quantum Loop gravity. If you are interested in understanding the fundimental nature of really, you should read this book.

  • Blink

  • The Power of Thinking Without Thinking
  • By: Malcolm Gladwell
  • Narrated by: Malcolm Gladwell
  • Length: 7 hrs and 44 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16,702
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,328
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,298

In his landmark best seller The Tipping Point, Malcolm Gladwell redefined how we understand the world around us. Now, in Blink, he revolutionizes the way we understand the world within. Blink is a book about how we think without thinking, about choices that seem to be made in an instant, in the blink of an eye, that actually aren't as simple as they seem. Why are some people brilliant decision makers, while others are consistently inept?

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Interesting read with contradictory messages

  • By Danny on 04-21-05

Outdated

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-12-17

Many of the psychologly principals presented are misstated or proven wrong. This book shows that a science writer is not as good as a scientist writing about their topic of expertise.

  • Consciousness and the Social Brain

  • By: Michael S. A. Graziano
  • Narrated by: Sean Runnette
  • Length: 7 hrs and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 202
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 167
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 167

What is consciousness and how can a brain, a mere collection of neurons, create it? In Consciousness and the Social Brain, Princeton neuroscientist Michael Graziano lays out an audacious new theory to account for the deepest mystery of them all. In Graziano's theory, the machinery that attributes awareness to others also attributes it to oneself. Damage that machinery and you disrupt your own awareness. Graziano discusses the science, the evidence, the philosophy, and the surprising implications of this new theory.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Cutting edge...

  • By Douglas on 08-07-14

A truly remarkable book.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-12-17

A complete discussion of consciousness and how human social interactions are made possible by consciousness.

  • How Emotions Are Made

  • The Secret Life of the Brain
  • By: Lisa Feldman Barrett
  • Narrated by: Cassandra Campbell
  • Length: 14 hrs and 32 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,072
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 950
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 940

Emotions feel automatic to us; that's why scientists have long assumed that emotions are hardwired in the body or the brain. Today, however, the science of emotion is in the midst of a revolution on par with the discovery of relativity in physics and natural selection in biology. This paradigm shift has far-reaching implications not only for psychology but also medicine, the legal system, airport security, child-rearing, and even meditation.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Eye-opening

  • By W. White on 05-29-17

A must read for anyone interested in emotions

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-24-17

A systematic, scientific explanation of emotions. clearly written and understandable by anyone. If you thought that you do not have the ability to modify your emotions, read this book. If you want to understand what emotions are, read this book. Or, if you have a general interest in how the human brain works, read this book.

33 of 36 people found this review helpful