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N. Raine

Albuquerque, NM
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  • VangoNotes for Human Anatomy & Physiology, 8/e, Ch 1: Homeostasis

  • By: Elaine N. Marieb, Katja Hoehn
  • Narrated by: Mark Greene, Amy LeBlanc
  • Length: 24 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 95
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 59
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 59

You're busy. We get it. With VangoNotes you can study "in between" all the other things you need to get done. VangoNotes gives you the confidence you need to succeed in the classroom. They're flexible; just download and go. And, they're efficient. Use them in your car, at the gym, walking to class, wherever. Get yours today and start studying.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • this is not the full book, only bits and pieces

  • By Anonymous User on 04-17-18

Commuting with A&P

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-24-16

I listen to the VangoNotes on my commute to school. The notes cover one (1) topic in each chapter - not necessarily the toughest topic, at least, it's not the toughest once you've heard these notes. This audio version has helped me to understand the particular topics much better, and I sincerely wish that the rest of the chapter's topics were covered. The audio description/narrative is easier to understand than in the book. The questions and answer sections are very helpful for locking in the subjects covers.

One suggestion for VangoNotes: for the True/False questions, when the answer is false, it would be better if the correct version were stated immediately after. Audio is a very powerful way to lock information in the mind, and having a false statement be the last word on something is not good for the memory.

I'm very pleased with the VangoNotes for the help they do offer, and I'm purchasing more for other subjects.

  • The Thinking Woman's Guide to Real Magic

  • By: Emily Croy Barker
  • Narrated by: Alyssa Bresnahan
  • Length: 26 hrs and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,105
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,939
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,951

Emily Croy Barker’s riveting debut novel is a must-read for fans of Lev Grossman and Deborah Harkness. The Thinking Woman’s Guide to Real Magic follows grad student Nora Fischer as she stumbles through a portal into a magical world. Having been transformed from drab to beautiful, Nora finds herself surrounded by glamorous friends. Life seems perfect. But then things take a terrible turn, and Nora must learn magic from a reclusive ally if she is to have any hope of survival...

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • In most ways, this is just the kind of book I seek

  • By Amazon Customer on 08-23-13

Heroine is more thoughtless than thinking

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-18-14

If you found yourself suddenly in Midieval Europe, would you be so idiotic as to insist that the whole culture adopt your 21st century values? Or would you realize that you need to adapt to the times in which you live, perhaps just pushing the envelope a tiny bit? This is an interesting story, ruined by a thoughtless, self-centered protagonist, who is supposed to be a literature doctoral student, but is incomprehensibly thoughtless in too many situations to really be an educated person, trained in critical thinking. I wish this were an early draft, and about to be re-written to present a more thoughtful and creative protagonist. Despite her, the overall plot is compelling.

The author has a unique voice and beautifully captures subtle feelings and observations. She also presents a compelling new story about fairies, different origins of magic, and different worlds. It is a creative story with an unfortunately formulaic heroine. I listened to the whole thing, frustrated at times with the protagonist, but drawn in none-the-less. The ending is abrupt and disappointing, and presents yet another example of the heroine's severe lack of ability to think.

Loved the narrator. She infused the story with deep emotion and gave the many characters distinct voices that felt right. I would seek out books narrated by her again.

54 of 55 people found this review helpful

  • The Darkest Lie

  • By: Gena Showalter
  • Narrated by: Max Bellmore
  • Length: 11 hrs and 53 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,080
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 840
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 840

Forced to his knees in agony whenever he speaks the truth, Gideon can recognize any lie - until he captures Scarlet, a demon-possessed immortal who claims to be his long-lost wife. He doesn't remember the beautiful female, much less wedding--or bedding--her. But he wants to...almost as much as he wants her.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The Darkest Lie

  • By Amy on 09-03-10

Watch out - its just a bad romance

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-12-14

What would have made The Darkest Lie better?

I couldn't listen past the first few chapters. It's deeply repetitive, based on the worst romance formulas. I hate characters like this. Stupid, stubborn, thoughtless. They only exist to "move the plot forward". Very boring.

Would you ever listen to anything by Gena Showalter again?

No.

What didn’t you like about Max Bellmore’s performance?

He reads every sentence as though it were a headline. Way over the top. I feel I'm being yelled at.

What reaction did this book spark in you? Anger, sadness, disappointment?

Disappointed. It seemed like a fun idea, but very poorly executed. I expected better from a "recommended" book.

Any additional comments?

I'm trying to get my credit back for this book.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Swords Against Death

  • The Adventures of Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser
  • By: Fritz Leiber
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Davis, Neil Gaiman (introduction)
  • Length: 9 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 551
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 348
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 354

Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser journey from the ancient city of Lankhmar, searching for a little adventure and debauchery to ease their broken hearts. When a stranger challenges them to find and fight Death on the Bleak Shore, they battle demonic birds, living mountains, and evil monks on the way to their heroic fate.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Delicious Prose, Ironic Vision, & a Fun Odd Couple

  • By Jefferson on 12-31-13

not nearly as good as the first book

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-19-13

What could have made this a 4 or 5-star listening experience for you?

If you loved the first book, don't bother with this one. None of the heros' previous knowledge actually informs their decisions in this one. In short, they are idiots, but in the first story, they were both were very clever, resourceful, and highly cognizant of the dangerous magical world in which they lived. In this book, they insist on disbelief in magical and mystical possibilities, and so fall stupidly into one situation after another due to "ignorance". It was VERY disappointing. I couldn't finish this book.

Has Swords Against Death turned you off from other books in this genre?

I won't read any more books in this series, but I very much enjoy books in this genre.

What do you think the narrator could have done better?

The narrator seemed to fall out of character quite a bit, I often could not tell when Fathrd or the Gray Mouser was speaking. It would sound like Fathrd's voice, then the story would indicate that it was the Gray Mouser who was speaking. This was confusing.

If you could play editor, what scene or scenes would you have cut from Swords Against Death?

I would cut all the repetitive scenes, where Fathrd falls under trances, due to his ignorance. He should have known better, his own mother is a terrifying witch with tremendous power, and it took him a great deal of skillful, thoughtful maneuvering to outwit her. What happened? Lobotomy. He must have had a voluntary lobotomy. It's very disappointing. It seems that the author got extremely lazy in his situation set ups. As his editor, I would have insisted that he keep the characters original strengths and build on them, which would have called for more creative writing.

Any additional comments?

I want my $$ back.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Wizard's First Rule

  • Sword of Truth, Book 1
  • By: Terry Goodkind
  • Narrated by: Sam Tsoutsouvas
  • Length: 34 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 13,314
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11,048
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11,108

In the aftermath of the brutal murder of his father, Richard Cypher encounters a mysterious woman, Kahlan Amnell, in his forest sanctuary. She seeks his help...and more. His world, his very beliefs, are shattered when ancient debts come due with thundering violence.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • This book is a blast

  • By Jim "The Impatient" on 05-09-12

Obscene with child abuse

Overall
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-14-11

This book is obscene. I don't use that word lightly. I'm an artist and I believe in free speech, but the author seems to delight in describing child rape, torture, mutilation and murder. It's truly vile, and evil, and unnecessary. If you are into this sort of thing, you will love it. I hate it, and I writing this to warn you not to listen.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful