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Randall D. Raymond

Evans, GA USA
  • 22
  • reviews
  • 94
  • helpful votes
  • 514
  • ratings
  • The Trespasser

  • A Novel
  • By: Tana French
  • Narrated by: Hilda Fay
  • Length: 20 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,449
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,863
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,827

Being on the murder squad is nothing like Detective Antoinette Conway dreamed it would be. Her partner, Stephen Moran, is the only person who seems glad she's there. The rest of her working life is a stream of thankless cases, vicious pranks, and harassment. Antoinette is savagely tough, but she's getting close to the breaking point. Their new case looks like yet another by-the-numbers lovers' quarrel gone bad. Aislinn Murray is blond, pretty, groomed to a shine, and dead in her catalogue-perfect living room, next to a table set for a romantic dinner.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A literary mystery

  • By lesley on 10-08-16

Her best yet!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-14-16

I have listened to every Tana French novel that has come out in audio and loved them all, but for my taste, this is her best. It's a bit more realistic and less dependent on surprising plot twists than some of her other stories, but wonderfully entertaining nonetheless.

I notice that several reviewers have panned the narration of this audiobook. I strongly disagree. I found it at least as well narrated as any other Tana French book I've listened to. Ms. Fay reads in a fairly heavy Irish dialect, which is what you would expect in a story told from the point of view of a working class Dubliner. I found the reading perfectly comprehensible and authentic.

  • Drugged: The Science and Culture Behind Psychotropic Drugs

  • By: Richard J. Miller
  • Narrated by: Roger Clark
  • Length: 15 hrs and 42 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 315
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 285
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 286

In Drugged, Miller takes listeners on an eye-opening tour of psychotropic drugs, describing the various kinds, how they were discovered and developed, and how they have played multiple roles in virtually every culture. Drugged brims with surprises, revealing the fact that antidepressant drugs evolved from rocket fuel, highlighting the role of hallucinogens in the history of religion, and asking whether Prozac can help depressed cats. Entertaining and authoritative, Drugged is a truly fascinating book.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • A good review; not very competent reader

  • By David Steinsaltz on 10-07-14

Good Read, But not for Everyone

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-04-15

I enjoyed this book immensely. However, I have a pretty good background in organic chemistry and biochemistry. Without some background in pharmacology, organic chemistry, or biochemistry, quite a bit of this material will be incomprehensible to you. I think a reasonable minimum pre-requisite to get the most out of the book would be some fairly recent undergraduate course work in one or more of these subjects. Though the author explains many of the technical terms and concepts he introduces, he often explains them in ways that assume only slightly less knowledge than if he offered no explanation at all. I do think a reasonably well educated reader with an interest in the subject could get a lot out of the book without much pharmacological or chemical knowledge if she didn't let the technical details throw her.

I enjoyed the narrator very much, but then I always like to hear narration with a british accent.

  • The Gluten Lie

  • And Other Myths About What You Eat
  • By: Alan Levinovitz PhD
  • Narrated by: Barry Press
  • Length: 7 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 63
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 52
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 53

In this groundbreaking work, Alan Levinovitz, PhD, exposes the myths behind how we come to believe which foods are good and which are bad and points the way to a truly healthful life, free from anxiety about what we eat.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Entire Book Not Included

  • By Randall D. Raymond on 10-05-15

Entire Book Not Included

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-05-15

I downloaded this book on the recommendation of a column in Skeptic Magazine. I was favorably impressed until I got to the last chapter. In this chapter Dr. Levinovitz includes a section in which he introduces a "diet" which does all the things he criticized others for doing in the rest of the book. I was confused until I re-read the column that caused me to purchase the book and saw that it referred to annotations in this final chapter that were NOT included in the audio book. I was so confused that I bought the Kindle edition which included the annotations, and found that Dr. Levinovitz is using his last chapter"diet" to illustrate all the fallacies (i.e. lies) he points out in the rest of the book. Without these annotations the listener is left with a confusing and false idea of the entire purpose of the book. It would have been easy to include these annotations (I have listened to many Audible books where footnotes and annotations are read along with the text) as they are mostly very short and would have added much to the enjoyment of the book.

I would like to say that I gave the performance 1 star, not because I didn't like the narrator, he was, in fact, very good, but because the deletion of the annotations was, IMO part of the performance.

12 of 13 people found this review helpful

  • Myths, Lies, and Half-Truths of Language Usage

  • By: John McWhorter, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: John McWhorter
  • Length: 12 hrs and 14 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 645
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 583
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 563

Conventional wisdom suggests English is going to the dogs, that bad grammar, slang, and illogical constructions signal a decline in standards of usage - to say nothing of the corruption wrought by email and text messages. But English is a complicated, marvelous language. Far from being a language in decline, English is the product of surprisingly varied linguistic forces, some of which have only recently come to light. And these forces continue to push English in exciting new directions.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • This course will turn you into a linguistics fan!

  • By Quaker on 11-15-13

Deserves at least a six star rating

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-13-14

This is undoubtedly the best course and possibly the best audible product I've ever listened to. Not only is the content fascinating, but Professor McWhorter is an absolute genius as a lecturer. He explains sometimes difficult concepts with crystal clarity and spices things up with funny illustrations, humorous asides and even an occasional song.

4 of 5 people found this review helpful

The Eyes of the Dragon audiobook cover art
  • The Eyes of the Dragon

  • By: Stephen King
  • Narrated by: Bronson Pinchot
  • Length: 10 hrs and 18 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,670
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,281
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,279

A tale of archetypal heroes and sweeping adventures, of dragons and princes and evil wizards, here is epic fantasy as only Stephen King could envision it.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Enjoyable

  • By Christine on 08-25-10

One of King's Best

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-14-13

This is definitely NOT a typical Stephen King horror novel. It's fantasy in a fairytale like style. Still, it is beautifully written in King's compelling manner. Once you've started listening, it's hard to stop.
I don't know how the choosing of readers works at Audible, but King always seems to get the best readers for his books. This book is no exception. Mr. Pinchot is fabulous. I put him right up there with Jim Dale of the Harry Potter series.

  • Broken Harbor

  • Dublin Murder Squad, Book 4
  • By: Tana French
  • Narrated by: Stephen Hogan
  • Length: 19 hrs and 56 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,150
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,467
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 5,441

In Broken Harbor, all but one member of the Spain family lies dead, and it’s up to Mick “Scorcher” Kennedy to find out why. Mick must piece together why their house is full of cameras pointed at holes in the walls and how a nighttime intruder bypassed all the locks. Meanwhile, the town of Broken Harbor holds something else for Mick: disturbing memories of a childhood summer gone terribly wrong.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Best in the Series

  • By sara miller on 07-29-12

Her best yet!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-27-12

Tana French is rapidly becoming my favorite writer of mystery thrillers. Quite possibly in my top 10 favorite writers in any genre. I loved In the Woods and Faithful Place and liked The Likeness very much. I would hardly have thought it possible, but this novel beats her others hands down, both as a whodunit and as an interesting set of psychological character studies. Not only is the novel itself wonderful, but Stephen Hogan's narration is the best in the series too. He does a wonderful job differentiating social classes by varying the Irish dialects they speak. All in all it is one of the best audiobooks I've ever listened to.

  • The Honest Truth About Dishonesty

  • How We Lie to Everyone - Especially Ourselves
  • By: Dan Ariely
  • Narrated by: Simon Jones
  • Length: 8 hrs and 41 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 789
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 666
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 661

Does the chance of getting caught affect how likely we are to cheat? How do companies pave the way for dishonesty? Does collaboration make us more honest or less so? Does religion improve our honesty? Most of us think of ourselves as honest, but, in fact, we all cheat. From Washington to Wall Street, the classroom to the workplace, unethical behavior is everywhere. None of us is immune whether it's the white lie to head off trouble or padding our expense reports.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • You Cheat (and I Do Too)

  • By Douglas C. Bates on 07-02-12

An interesting book

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-23-12

Another really interesting book by Dan Ariely. One of the things I like about his books, including this one, is that he goes into great detail explaining how the experiments backing up his claims were conducted; thus allowing the reader/listener some basis for evaluating those claims.

I also really enjoy Simon Jones' posh British accent.

2 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • The Wind Through the Keyhole

  • The Dark Tower
  • By: Stephen King
  • Narrated by: Stephen King
  • Length: 10 hrs and 26 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,917
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 5,451
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,423

In The Wind Through the Keyhole, Stephen King has returned to the rich landscape of Mid-World. This story within a story within a story finds Roland Deschain, Mid-World’s last gunslinger, in his early days during the guilt-ridden year following his mother’s death. Sent by his father to investigate evidence of a murderous shape-shifter, a "skin-man", Roland takes charge of Bill Streeter, a brave but terrified boy who is the sole surviving witness to the beast’s most recent slaughter.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • An exceptional story, but I miss George Guidall.

  • By Amazon Customer on 04-25-12

Definitely not the best in the series

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-16-12

As usual with a King book, you can't put it down once you start. I've read the entire Dark Tower series and this is probably the weakest of the bunch. However, I always enjoy interesting plot devices and this has one of the most unusual King has ever used. I don't think it spoils anything to point it out, but if you want, you can skip to the next paragraph........The book actually tells three stories one inside of another inside of another.

I've gotten used to him, but I really don't care much for King as a narrator, especially since for many of his books he gets some of the best in the business. He has a flat voice and some mildly annoying speech mannerisms (e.g. he swallows his "L's").

  • Steve Jobs

  • By: Walter Isaacson
  • Narrated by: Dylan Baker
  • Length: 25 hrs and 19 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 24,535
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 21,636
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 21,598

Based on more than 40 interviews with Jobs conducted over two years—as well as interviews with more than a hundred family members, friends, adversaries, competitors, and colleagues—Walter Isaacson has written a riveting story of the roller-coaster life and searingly intense personality of a creative entrepreneur whose passion for perfection and ferocious drive revolutionized six industries: personal computers, animated movies, music, phones, tablet computing, and digital publishing.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Interesting man

  • By Jeanne on 11-13-11

Good Job

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-16-12

Believe me, I am NOT and Apple Fanboi, but I really liked this book. As with his biography of Einstein, Isaacson does a good job of mixing his subject's work with his personal life. The narration is very good, though not outstanding.

  • Attack of the Theocrats!

  • How the Religious Right Harms Us All - and What We Can Do About It
  • By: Sean Faircloth
  • Narrated by: Sean Faircloth, Richard Dawkins
  • Length: 6 hrs and 8 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 223
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 202
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 204

At no time in history has the United States had such a high percentage of theocratic members of Congress - those who expressly endorse religious bias in law. Just as ominously, especially for those who share the values and views of Thomas Jefferson and James Madison, at no other time have religious fundamentalists effectively had veto power over one of the country's two major political parties. As Sean Faircloth argues in this deeply sobering yet highly engaging book, this has led to the crumbling of the country's most cherished founding principle - the wall of separation between church and state.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Was expecting more but well worth it

  • By AWeirdly on 04-13-12

Polemical

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-16-12

I happen to agree with the politics of this book, but if you didn't, you wouldn't find this book very edifying. Short on facts. Long on opinion. This is an author narrated book, and though he does a better job than I would, it is definitely NOT professionally narrated.

8 of 11 people found this review helpful