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P. Giorgio

  • 110
  • reviews
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  • helpful votes
  • 369
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  • The Wedding Guest

  • An Alex Delaware Novel
  • By: Jonathan Kellerman
  • Narrated by: John Rubinstein
  • Length: 12 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 229
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 212
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 213

LAPD Lieutenant Milo Sturgis is a fine homicide detective, but when he needs to get into the mind of a killer, he leans on the expertise of his best friend, the brilliant psychologist Dr. Alex Delaware. While Sturgis has a knack for piecing together the details of a crime, Delaware can decipher the darkest intents driving the most vicious of perpetrators. And there’s no better place for the doctor’s analytical skills to shine than a rowdy hall full of young men and women intoxicated on life and lust...and suddenly faced with the specter of death. 

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Can’t be Kellerman

  • By Kelley Jo on 02-08-19

just ok

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-14-19

long boring middle, but as always, worth the credit. more quality time with Milo which is better than recent past volumes. this one would have been much better if a bit shorter without the Long's middle unrelated rambling.

  • Verses for the Dead

  • A Pendergast Novel
  • By: Douglas Preston, Lincoln Child
  • Narrated by: Rene Auberjonois
  • Length: 10 hrs and 33 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,789
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 1,666
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,657

After an overhaul of leadership at the FBI's New York field office, A. X. L. Pendergast is abruptly forced to accept an unthinkable condition of continued employment: the famously rogue agent must now work with a partner. Pendergast and his new teammate, junior agent Coldmoon, are assigned to Miami Beach, where a rash of killings by a bloodthirsty psychopath are distinguished by a confounding M.O.: cutting out the hearts of his victims and leaving them - along with cryptic handwritten letters - at local gravestones, unconnected save in one bizarre way.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Completely Absorbing Pendergast novel...

  • By shelley on 01-01-19

Very good.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-06-19

I like the use of the updated technology. Yet Pendergast retains his same self, appearance and judgment. I liked that there was no Constance to deal with. I liked that we still had a bit of an underground final scene as all the P&C Pendergast books tend to have, though this one had no labyrinth. I did think that the final scene lacked something, but I can't put my finger on it. I love that in the last minutes, Pendergast explains to Smithback what we may readers/listeners may have missed. Can't wait for another episode, and wish P&C could turn one out every month.

  • First Love

  • By: Ivan Turgenev
  • Narrated by: David Troughton
  • Length: 2 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 49
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 37
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 36

At the end of a dinner party, the remaining guests drink wine and tell stories of their first love. For one of them, it will be a dark journey into his past, reawakening unbearable memories of his obsession with the beautiful Zinaida.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Turgenev's Famous Novel...

  • By Douglas on 01-16-14

Exquisite language and easy Plot

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-22-18

Loved it. Enchanted imagery. Perfect. The story is a universal one. The little insertions of commentary to guide the reader are invaluable. Requires for me a second "read."

  • Forest Dark

  • A Novel
  • By: Nicole Krauss
  • Narrated by: Gabra Zackman
  • Length: 8 hrs and 12 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 154
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 144
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 144

Jules Epstein, a man whose drive, avidity, and outsized personality have, for 68 years, been a force to be reckoned with, is undergoing a metamorphosis. In the wake of his parents' deaths, his divorce from his wife of more than 30 years, and his retirement from the New York legal firm where he was a partner, he's felt an irresistible need to give away his possessions, alarming his children and perplexing the executor of his estate. With the last of his wealth, he travels to Israel with a nebulous plan to do something to honor his parents.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • immediate Re-read

  • By Anonymous User on 09-28-17

I just can't listen for another minute.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-11-18

Hooked on Krauss' "The History of Love," I can't get through her follow up books. I like the style, I like the form, but I don't enjoy these novels. No suspense, but there are questions. After about 3 hours, I cannot explain what this is about. The beginning suggests an interesting takeoff. It falls away quickly. It feels like Krauss wrote a letter to herself. Sorry.

  • The Reckoning

  • A Novel
  • By: John Grisham
  • Narrated by: Michael Beck
  • Length: 17 hrs and 36 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 10,375
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,451
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 9,416

Pete Banning was Clanton's favorite son, a returning war hero, the patriarch of a prominent family, a farmer, a father, a neighbor, and a faithful member of the Methodist church. Then one cool October morning in 1946, he rose early, drove into town, walked into the church, and calmly shot and killed the Reverend Dexter Bell. 

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Would make a 5 star four hour novella, ...

  • By Wayne on 11-03-18

I cannot believe how great it was.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-04-18

I had all but given up home on Grisham. His last several novels were boring and seemed as if they were written by someone else. This one is riveting -- the whole 17 hrs. While it's a well-told tale of murder, inheritance, small-town folksy, all wrapped up in a mysterious murder.

There is a 2-3 hour backstory that covers the main character's military service. Normally this would be a turnoff for me, but I have to admit I was never bored. There was a lot of history I didn't know, and the details of the conditions our soldiers endured. One can complain that it was a bit too long, but I did not want to fast forward through it.

Once the war portion ends and the story returns to the current murder, progress on the unanswered questions comes slowly, tantalizingly and with extreme care. There are other meanderings concerning multiple lawyers, other characters and a series of court proceedings that give the story a whole new level of tension.

The ending does not disappoint. We (the reader) knows some things, but not everything. The pacing, the reveals, the pathos, the believability all hold up. Afterwards, putting some of the events in hindsight brought me back to the story, and the connections just lit up. I love the way my own opinions about all the characters changed over the course of the book. I started out rooting for a killer to prevail, ended up wrinkling my nose at him. At first, I found the young adults necesssary accessories to the story; in the end, we learn about them even more deeply.

I will say that the most surprising aspect of the novel for me was an often forgotten maternal character. That character's transformation and the resolution of her story is beyond the beyond.

Excellent in all ways. Wonderful writing. Narration, as usual, was superb. In a year or two I will re-listen Even though I know the ending, all the incidentals were so engaging it will be worth hearing again.

21 of 27 people found this review helpful

  • This Is Your Life, Harriet Chance

  • By: Jonathan Evison
  • Narrated by: Susan Boyce
  • Length: 6 hrs and 45 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 215
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 197
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 199

With her husband Bernard two years in the grave, seventy-nine-year-old Harriet Chance sets sail on an ill-conceived Alaskan cruise only to discover through a series of revelations that she's been living the past sixty years of her life under entirely false pretenses. There, amid the buffets and lounge singers, between the imagined appearance of her late husband and the very real arrival of her estranged daughter midway through the cruise, Harriet is forced to take a long look back, confronting the truth about pivotal events that changed the course of her life.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Absolutely and completely.

  • By joyce on 03-14-16

All in all remarkably good

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-29-18

The first quarter was mediocre. The long middle was wonderful, the ending was too abrupt

  • A Wrinkle in Time

  • By: Madeleine L'Engle
  • Narrated by: Hope Davis, Ava DuVernay, Madeleine L'Engle, and others
  • Length: 6 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16,111
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 14,380
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 14,387

Meg Murry, her little brother Charles Wallace, and their mother are having a midnight snack on a dark and stormy night when an unearthly stranger appears at their door. He claims to have been blown off course and goes on to tell them that there is such a thing as a "tesseract", which, if you didn't know, is a wrinkle in time. Meg's father had been experimenting with time travel when he suddenly disappeared. Will Meg, Charles Wallace, and their friend Calvin outwit the forces of evil as they search through space for their father?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great narration.

  • By Amazing Customer on 11-17-14

Not a fan.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-26-18

Derivative,. sometimes silly. A sudden, near the end "Christian" redemption which came from nowhere quite near the end, as if author couldn't think of anything deeper or more creative.

every child story you've ever read or seen is encompassed in this book, and I just feel it was too derivative to be original. A bit over rated.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • The Music Shop

  • A Novel
  • By: Rachel Joyce
  • Narrated by: Steven Hartley
  • Length: 8 hrs and 29 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 998
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 936
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 935

It is 1988. On a dead-end street in a run-down suburb there is a music shop that stands small and brightly lit, jam-packed with records of every kind. Like a beacon, the shop attracts the lonely, the sleepless, and the adrift; Frank, the shop's owner, has a way of connecting his customers with just the piece of music they need. Then, one day, into his shop comes a beautiful young woman, Ilse Brauchmann, who asks Frank to teach her about music.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • A 3.75 Star Experience

  • By kurdis teed on 04-06-18

Wonderful and a proper ending

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-08-18

touching and warm. And Ensemble of characters. For me Harold Fry was different and better, but had I read this one first I would have chosen this one as my favorite. Two years ago Harold Fry and Queenie Hennessy changed my life. Frank and Ilse reminded me again of what is important through all these changes.

4 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • An Odyssey

  • A Father, a Son, and an Epic
  • By: Daniel Mendelsohn
  • Narrated by: Bronson Pinchot
  • Length: 10 hrs and 37 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 213
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 195
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 192

When 81-year-old Jay Mendelsohn decides to enroll in the undergraduate Odyssey seminar his son teaches at Bard College, the two find themselves on an adventure as profoundly emotional as it is intellectual. For Jay, a retired research scientist who sees the world through a mathematician's unforgiving eyes, this return to the classroom is his "one last chance" to learn the great literature he'd neglected in his youth - and, even more, a final opportunity to more fully understand his son, a writer and classicist.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Seems written with the READER in mind. Perfect

  • By P. Giorgio on 01-05-18

Seems written with the READER in mind. Perfect

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-05-18

I believe this was written FOR ME, and I believe you will feel the same. Not only is it about the teaching college freshmen the story of the Odyssey, it is about the authors' discovery of the universality of family strife and love. It is cunningly written in the same ring composition that Homer uses to write The Odyssey. The whole book is a circle, even the similarities between his father, Jay, himself, even his wife and other relatives. We don't learn much about Dan's sons, but I am sure he could write circles around them too!! I love the slow reveals, the apparent diversions and easy return to the story at hand. There are stories within stories, AND sentences within sentences. It's easily readable. It's almost like a Proem itself. Read this book before taking the class.... **everything** is in it and prepares your reading mind to understand it.

For me, it's a lesson in fiction composition, narration, and structure. I love the language lessons, the breakdown As for the Odyssey, I feel like I gathered enough facts to survive a trivia game if some basic facts of the Odyssey were included. LOL.

At any rate, it's worth your time. I purchased the Kindle edition just to keep up with the words. You can read it at the surface or you can dissect it and discover its application to your own life.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Signature of All Things

  • A Novel
  • By: Elizabeth Gilbert
  • Narrated by: Juliet Stevenson
  • Length: 21 hrs and 43 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,321
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,857
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 4,866

In The Signature of All Things, Elizabeth Gilbert returns to fiction, inserting her inimitable voice into an enthralling story of love, adventure and discovery. Spanning much of the 18th and 19th centuries, the novel follows the fortunes of the extraordinary Whittaker family as led by the enterprising Henry Whittaker - a poor-born Englishman who makes a great fortune in the South American quinine trade, eventually becoming the richest man in Philadelphia.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Don't miss this one

  • By Molly-o on 12-27-13

A near perfect book.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-05-17

It is simply the best book I've read in a very long time. The words, the images, the life story of Alma Whittacre -- which begins with her father's parents and goes until Alma is in her 90s. There is so much (accurate) history and science that along with the travails of Alma's clan, you will learn more than you ever thought you would be interested in regarding EVERYTHING -- but mostly Botany. Gilbert drops names like Captain Cook, Darwin, Einstein, and some big deal scientists. You will learn about trading rootstalks and seeds in 1700s and 1800s and 1900s. You will learn that human brutality upon the earth and each other is not new at all.

I love the things that are left OUT OF THE BOOK. Things you must re-think and rearrange your thoughts about. There are a few mysteries and a few facts that come much later in the book -- answered just as I was beginning to wonder when we'd get to the truth.

As deeply and intimately as Gilbert writes the human stories, she writes the plant part of the story. There is a definite metaphor going back and forth between Alma's knowledge of the world of plants and seeds and Alma's learning about life and love.

You might be charmed by her effort at an innocent romance and then later horrified by its outcome; you might swoon over her finding her one true love and become heartbroken over that as well.

While the denouement, (which) is her discovery of a 20+ year old question, isn't pleasant, Alma, such a glorious soul, relishes in its discovery and it makes her very happy.

If you are queasy about frank sexual thoughts and activities, if you are too tender to enjoy the violence of the natural world and its replication upon a single woman, you might want to pass, but I hope you don't.

The writing is magnificent.

The aftermath will leave you longing to get outside and see what Alma saw. I listened to the book on Audible then bought the Kindle immediately, so I could go back, highlight and try to better see through Alma's eyes. Seriously, I bought a hand lens/magnifier so I could look into moss and look at leaves and bark and roots and flowers so I could see what Alma saw.

My only ***complaint.*** involves the mystery character in the last chapters of the book. I do not like the name of the character. I get the meta aspect of it. I get the need to bury it in the earlier pages to raise tension at the end, but the name once revealed, was terribly distracting to me. Alma's interaction with that character also seemed a bit contrived, and not in keeping with Alma's soul. True, it was foretold several times in the book, but maybe I'm so in love with the book, that the occurrences of these small things took me out of Alma's world. Again, the plant world/human world are enmeshed at all levels.

I hope everyone loves it as I did. (I know I'm about 4 years late to this party.)