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Dubi

New York, NY
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  • The Millionaires

  • By: Brad Meltzer
  • Narrated by: Scott Brick
  • Length: 14 hrs and 59 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,332
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 915
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 910

Charlie and Oliver Caruso are brothers who work at Greene & Greene, a private bank so exclusive you need two million dollars just to be a client. But when the door of success slams in their faces, they're faced with an offer they can't refuse: three million dollars in an abandoned account. No one knows it exists, and even better, it doesn't belong to anyone.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Possibly the best Meltzer to date

  • By Snoodely on 07-27-12

Dated Formulaic Meltzer

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-24-19

Oliver Caruso is a typical Brad Meltzer protagonist -- an ambitious young professional from humble roots who wants to get ahead but is naive and gullible. In the Millionaires, this Meltzer Everyman works at a private bank, hoping to eventually earn a place in a prestigious business school. Oliver's brother David is the opposite -- an artist, musician, and borderline ne'er-do-well who also works at the bank just to make a little money. When the opportunity arises to steal $3 million, Oliver is reluctant but Charlie talks him into it.

Then it all goes to hell.

The Millionaires is a classic double chase -- the brothers have to evade the law while they pursue the real criminals (yes, they themselves committed the crime that starts things off, but the real criminals are really bad guys -- not going to say more to avoid spoilers). As in any double chase, the key is the mcguffin. Unfortunately, this mcguffin is not all that interesting to begin with, and is seriously out of date. Still, the book is not bad, if you like Meltzer -- yes, his protagonist makes some poor decisions, but he's set up to be naive and gullible, so he will make poor decisions.

I've read most of Meltzer's thrillers (to use his own categorization to distinguish from his non-ficiton and children's books), but this is the first I've listened to. In print, his book are page turners. In audio, I cannot characterize this as a car idler. I try to avoid Scott Brick if possible, but with Meltzer, that's not possible, Brick narrating almost all of his thrillers. This is early Brick, so it's not totally un-listenable. Meltzer is best, to my taste, when he writes about DC insider politics. This is not at all set in that world. Still a fan, though.

  • Annabel Scheme

  • By: Robin Sloan
  • Narrated by: Robin Sloan
  • Length: 3 hrs and 10 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 15
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 13
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 15

Annabel Scheme is a detective story set in an alternate San Francisco where the digital and the occult live side-by-side. It's a short listen, perfect for people who like Sherlock Holmes, Douglas Adams, ghosts and/or the Internet. In Scheme's San Francisco, an indie rocker's new tracks are climbing the charts, even though the rocker herself is long dead. A devout gamer has gone missing, and the only trace of him that remains is inside his favorite game, the blockbuster MMORPG called World of Jesus. And the richest man in the city, the inventor of the search engine called Grail, might just have made a deal with a devil.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • An Able Scheme

  • By Dubi on 03-11-19

An Able Scheme

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-11-19

Before Mr. Penumbra, Robin Sloan wrote the novella Annabel Scheme and self-published with the help of a Kickstarter campaign. After Mr. Punumbra put Sloan squarely (and deservedly) on the map, Annabel Scheme received new attention, including an audio edition that came out last year, with the author himself reading it.

Like Mr. Penumbra, this novella mixes modern technology with the archaic -- in this case, the occult, in a San Francisco that exists in a slightly alternate universe. Annabel Scheme is a private investigator who specializes in the digital and the occult, and Hu is her server, an artificial intelligence who can see the world through her surveillance earrings and communicate with her in English. Together, they take on a case of music recorded by dead people, and get caught up in a few other mysteries (distinctly reminiscent of another San Francisco writer I like a lot, Christopher Moore).

So it's all good fun, as you'd expect from Sloan if you're a Penumbra fan, and having Sloan narrate is a good choice, since he knows how to voice his characters, especially his first person AI narrator. His voice is not the most, uh, audiogenic shall we say, but it works. As much as I enjoyed the proceedings, I cannot go all in with five stars because I did find the story somewhat scattershot and I'm not sure exactly what actually happened in the end (on several fronts).

  • Fierce Attachments

  • By: Vivian Gornick
  • Narrated by: Jill Fox
  • Length: 6 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 47
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 38
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 37

In this deeply etched and haunting memoir, Vivian Gornick tells the story of her lifelong battle with her mother for independence. There have been numerous books about mother and daughter, but none has dealt with this closest of filial relations as directly or as ruthlessly. Gornick's groundbreaking book confronts what Edna O'Brien has called "the prinicpal crux of female despair": the unacknowledged Oedipal nature of the mother-daughter bond.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Mother Daughter Relationships

  • By Chrissie on 07-28-15

The Situation of This Story: What is Real?

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-11-19

Vivian Gornick literally wrote the book on writing memoirs, "The Situation and the Story: The Art of Personal Narrative." This book, originally published in 1987, was the memoir that put her in position to be the authority on writing memoirs, of which she has written a few. Two problems, though: Is it boring? Yes. Is it real? Uh, maybe not so much.

Gornick's memoir about her relationship with her mother is built around the two of them walking the city streets of New York. But Gornick confessed to inventing some of those walks, and inventing one character in particular, a homeless person, perhaps the most memorable character and most memorable scene in the book. Invented. Made up. In a memoir. Non-fiction.

Gornick defended herself to one interviewer by saying, "What actually happened is only raw material; what the writer makes of what happened is all that matters." Uh, no. What the writer makes of it only matters in the context of what actually happened. If what actually happened is made up, then there is nothing for the writer to make something of. Call it what it is -- fiction.

This is the person who teaches other people how to write memoirs. Make it up, that's OK.

But never mind, even it was all true, it's still a bore. Worse -- a pretentious bore. At one point, Gornick compares her personal problems to people who were incinerated at Hiroshima. My wife and I, who listened to the book together, literally did a double take at the car dashboard when we heard that, not believing what we just heard, believing that maybe the car dashboard was making it up, not the (so-called) memoirist.

If you're considering listening to this book, try something else on for size: instead of listening to Gornick's take on her mother, write something about your own mother. I guarantee you, it will be far more interesting than this. Or read Angela's Ashes, Are You My Mother, Lies My Mother Never Told Me, or any of the many other excellent memoirs about mothers.

  • Lord John and the Private Matter

  • By: Diana Gabaldon
  • Narrated by: Jeff Woodman
  • Length: 9 hrs and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 4,213
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,411
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 3,439

With more than 10 million copies in print worldwide, New York Times best-selling author Diana Gabaldon's Outlander series is a global phenomenon. Lord John and the Private Matter, starring one of the most popular Outlander characters, captures all the adventure and magic of the series while delivering a fresh tale that is utterly captivating.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Lively tale, well told

  • By GoryDetails on 12-06-04

Grey Matter

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-11-19

Lord John Grey, a supporting character in Diana Gabaldon's Outlander series, gets his own series of historical mysteries, starting with The Private Matter. While investigating into the mysterious fiance of his cousin, Lord John is tasked with looking into the murder of a fellow soldier who may have been a spy selling English military secrets at the start of the Seven Years War.

The parallel investigations take Lord John into the extremes of London society in the 18th century, from the seemliest to the seamiest, with quite a bit of overlap between the two worlds. As in the best historical mysteries, the actual history of the era is depicted in the context of a classic mystery, and the mystery incorporates elements of the historical period that would be anachronistic in contemporary stories.

Jeff Wooman's narration is pitch perfect -- he sticks mostly to Lord John's upper class accent and doesn't go overboard when voicing other characters. The variety of characters are well drawn as well. What keeps this from earning five stars? The final reveals -- and there are a number of them -- are confessed in detail by the characters. The "talking villain" convention, long hackneyed. Too bad, as everything leading up to those revelations was handled well.

  • The Calculating Stars

  • A Lady Astronaut Novel
  • By: Mary Robinette Kowal
  • Narrated by: Mary Robinette Kowal
  • Length: 11 hrs and 41 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,159
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,099
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,098

On a cold spring night in 1952, a huge meteorite fell to earth and obliterated much of the East Coast of the US, including Washington, DC. The ensuing climate cataclysm will soon render the Earth inhospitable for humanity, as the last such meteorite did for the dinosaurs. This looming threat calls for a radically accelerated effort to colonize space and requires a much-larger share of humanity to take part in the process. Elma York’s drive to become the first lady astronaut is so strong that even the most dearly held conventions of society may not stand a chance against her.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Super impressed

  • By Mean Jane on 07-27-18

But What About the Meteorite?

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-22-19

In the early 50s, a meteorite hits the Earth near Washington DC, killing millions, including the entirety of the U.S. government, and launching a climate crisis that is predicted to be a dinosaur-level extinction event. In response, the government that emerges from the superheated ashes embarks on an ambitious and expensive plan to go out into space and colonize it, saving humanity from an uninhabitable planet.

Science fiction most often tackles contemporary issues by projecting them into the future and sometimes out of the confines of our home planet. Sometimes, it goes backwards in time instead, either via time travel, or by imagining an alternate history. The meteorite in this book creates an alternate history in which a buttoned up 50s-era America faces accelerated social issues, and has forced upon it the climate crisis that in actual history was still about a half century away.

Kudos to Kowal for tackling these issues of gender discrimination, racial discrimination, and mental health. And kudos to her for setting it in a science fictiony world where the science she presents is so credible and highly detailed.

But there is a huge problem -- the meteorite. No, not the problems created on this alternate universe by the impact of the meteorite. Quite the contrary -- the complete absence of problems created by the impact once the story jumps forward a few years to focus on the preparations to go out into space. Millions died, cities were eradicated, the two superpower regimes were wiped out. What then? It's nearly 20 years since 9/11 and we're still not over that, how can an extinction event become a non-factor in a story about an extinction event?

Then there is this -- the social issues Kowal tackles played out over the ensuing decades in the real world. It didn't take a deus ex machina event like a meteorite to trigger women's rights and civil rights movements. Or even a space race and a moon landing. Or even a climate crisis. So why does this story need that event to get it going? The word is: gratuitous. We don't need it. Why does Kowal need it? I for one would have been more impressed by reading an alternate history where a woman like Kowal's protagonist is the catalyst.

And surely Kowal must have considered how different it would be to examine a climate crisis created by (and potentially solved by) us vs. one that was completely out of anyone's control -- that there is nothing to be learned in this situation is perhaps a good explanation for why Kowal completely abandons any discussion of it for the majority of the book. It almost seems like she's avoiding it on purpose, as it dawns on the characters that money and resources are better spent on mitigating the problems on Earth rather than throwing them at some far-fetched plan to move everyone out into space -- and if not everyone, who decides who stays behind and perishes, which will number in the billions of people?

Too many problems. Not enough drama. At least the narration is excellent -- Kowal has the perfect voice to tell the story of her first person protagonist.

  • Tiger Woods

  • By: Jeff Benedict, Armen Keteyian
  • Narrated by: Roger Casey
  • Length: 15 hrs and 23 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,963
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,760
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,765

In 2009, Tiger Woods was the most famous athlete on the planet, a transcendent star of almost unfathomable fame and fortune living what appeared to be the perfect life - married to a Swedish beauty and the father of two young children. Winner of 14 major golf championships and 79 PGA Tour events, Woods was the first billion-dollar athlete, earning more than $100 million a year in endorsements from the likes of Nike, Gillette, AT&T, and Gatorade. But it was all a carefully crafted illusion. As it turned out, Woods had been living a double life for years.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Balanced Look at One of Golf's Greatest

  • By Bill Pence on 05-09-18

Schadenfreude For Non-Fans

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-16-19

If you don't like Tiger Woods, you're going to love "Tiger Woods". If you're a fan of Tiger Woods, "Tiger Woods" will infuriate you. Consider me infuriated. If you're a fan of good gossip and tabloid journalism, you're going to doubly love "Tiger Woods". If you're a fan of good investigative journalism, "Tiger Woods" will infuriate you. Consider me doubly infuriated.

This is a hatchet job that revels in Tiger's downfall while diminishing or demeaning his accomplishments (as much as that is possible given how unassailable some of those accomplishments are), and even tries to invent new scandals out of rumors.

The authors reveal up front that they could not interview anyone with an NDA or anyone who felt close enough to Tiger to ask his permission before talking to them (permission was denied). The authors tell us up front that most of their source material was already out in the public. Most of the people who did talk to the authors had at least one ax to grind. The authors turned down a chance to talk to Tiger because of his onerous demands, even though by that time, Tiger was for the first time ever giving out numerous candid interviews to just about everyone who asked.

Their primary goal, they say, was to present a balanced view of Tiger, but in their world, that means holding up gossip and innuendo against sworn testimony, giving more weight to the former while dismissing the latter (see my full review at Good Reads for detailed examples). Only in their tilted world of hit journalism can Tiger's desire to practice or upgrade his swing, or play through pain to the point of injuring himself, be a moral failing. Totally infuriating.

The narration suffers as well. The glee with which the text tears down Tiger is equally conveyed in how it is read. And it is poorly recorded -- I could hear (at least through my earbuds) every edit, with one sentence spoken differently and at different volume than the preceding or succeeding sentence. For a book to be recorded this poorly in 2018 makes no sense, although you will likely not notice if you listen in a car.

I was looking forward to reading a balanced biography of Tiger Woods. I thought balance would mean tempering the tabloid mentality that caused the feeding frenzy over his personal scandals, which seem kind of tame in today's world where worse behavior does not disqualify people from holding higher office. Instead, we have rehash journalism and gossip mongering masquerading as serious biography. Maybe for those who would enjoy the schadenfreude of listening to Tiger being trashed. But not for me.

  • The Frame-Up

  • The Golden Arrow Mysteries Series, Book 1
  • By: Meghan Scott Molin
  • Narrated by: Andrea Emmes
  • Length: 10 hrs and 18 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 147
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 133
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 132

MG Martin lives and breathes geek culture. She works as a writer for the comic book company she idolized as a kid. But despite her love of hooded vigilantes, MG prefers her comics stay on the page. But when someone in LA starts recreating crime scenes from her favorite comic book, MG is the LAPD’s best - and only - lead. She recognizes the golden arrow left at the scene as the calling card of her favorite comic book hero. The thing is…superheroes aren’t real. Are they? When Detective Kildaire asks for her comic book expertise, MG is more than up for the adventure.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • I Was Hoping It Would Be So Much More

  • By L. G. on 12-06-18

Hit or Miss, Saved by the Narrator

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-06-19

Meghan Scott Molin had a dream one night that a friend and a posse of drag queens were chasing a killer through San Diego Comi Con, woke up laughing, and thought that was a good idea for a book. She modeled her first person protagonist on another friend (the same friend perhaps?) and came up with MG, a purple-haired self-professed nerd who writes comic books for a living but hopes to be a cosplay fashion designer.

And then she thought up every nerd culture reference she could imagine -- Harry Potter, Lord of the Rings, Game of Thrones, Star Wars, Star Trek, video games, even in a bit of meta-reference nodding at the ultimate nerd culture reference source, The Big Bang Theory (bazinga!).

Looking through the reviews here and on Good Reads, whether you like this or hate this will really depend on whether you like MG and her non-stop pop culture references. Some people do, some people don't. I liked it well enough. I attribute that solely to the narration of Andrea Emmes, who 100% captures the voice of a snarky nerd, in a good way. If not for her work, the overworked landscape of comic books, superheroes, and pop culture references presented by the author does not rise above mediocrity (and the humor is not quite funny enough).

There is also the issue of plot. Most comic-superhero stories are science fictiony, this one is structured like a mystery. Problem is, it's really not much of a mystery, especially in the do-I-care who-done-it or why-they-done-it categories. It's barely paint by numbers. But I liked MG and her pop culture references, especially as brought to life by Emmes, so four stars overall but three stars for story (more like two and a half, really).

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Fire in the Valley

  • The Birth and Death of the Personal Computer
  • By: Michael Swaine, Paul Freiberger
  • Narrated by: Don Azevedo
  • Length: 15 hrs and 24 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 42
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 37
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 37

In the 1970s, while their contemporaries were protesting the computer as a tool of dehumanization and oppression, a motley collection of college dropouts, hippies, and electronics fanatics were engaged in something much more subversive. Obsessed with the idea of getting computer power into their own hands, they launched from their garages a hobbyist movement that grew into an industry, and ultimately a social and technological revolution.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Covers history that most others do not

  • By R. Stearns on 01-13-19

Burying the Lede

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-01-19

A 15 hour book is not a newspaper article, so there is not necessarily a rush to get to the point -- the lede, in journalism, which leads an article. But when a book about the history of the personal computer takes 9 hours to get to the story of Apple and 11 hours to reach the introduction of the IBM PC and the ascendance of Microsoft, it has truly buried the lede, as reporters say.

I thought I entered the PC world on the ground floor in 1983, shortly after the introduction of the PC (I had already worked briefly on the Apple II). Indeed, my entire career, a successful one, derived from being there at the start, when the first PCs came out, embracing this new technology that the rest of the established computing world dismissed. But Fire in the Valley tells me that I got into the game shortly after halftime, that I missed the entire start of the game.

Maybe so, but that doesn't make the first nine hours of this book any more interesting. Really, it should have been just a prologue, maybe a chapter or two or three, an hour tops. Otherwise, it's really just a long series a name checking people, products and companies that most people never heard of (and never heard of again after their minor role in PC development was over).

But the last six hours are worth it. The 1999 movie adaptation of an earlier edition of this book, Pirates of Silicon Valley, a great movie, starts off at the 1984 unveiling of Apple's 1984-inspired Super Bowl commercial introducing the Macintosh computer. It then flashes back to the beginnings of Jobs and Woz at Apple, and Bill Gates at Microsoft, and spends most of its screen time on them. The book should have been written that way. It was not. Waiting nine hours for those stories to start -- bad, bad decision.

Still, if you're interested in this subject, it's an illuminating look at innovations that have profoundly and universally changed the way we live our lives.

I do have a couple of other bones to pick. This third edition adds the idea of the death of the PC to its subtitle, the idea that smart phones have rendered PCs obsolete (he writes on his Window laptop -- how can you write a review of this length on a smart phone? You can't.). When this edition came out in 2014, PC sales were still over 315 million worldwide annually, just past its 2011-2012 peak of over 350 million. Of course Smart Phone sales have tripled to over a billion and a half per year since 2011, but really, given advances in technology, a smart phone is basically a PC in a phone (15-20 years ago, I worked on the telecommunications industry committee charged with defining broadband capabilities for mobile phones, bringing computer and internet functionality to the cellular market -- we succeeded!).

But it's easy to understand why these authors have made this mistake. PCs are far from obsolete to anyone who walks into a modern workplace, where one sits on every desk, from the receptionist to the CEO, the majority of tasks still requiring a full work station. But in the narrow world view of this book, the individual home user is all that really matters. Yes, it's impossible to ignore how business has taken advantage of PC technology, but our authors pay no more than lip service. Gamers too have a legitimate gripe at being marginalized.

This narrow view leads to bone-pick #3: if your world view is this limited in scope, Apple reigns supreme. But in the real world, Apple still has a shockingly low market share, as it has had all along -- historically topping out at 6-7% of the annual PC market, and even in the world of smartphones, settling for a share of what remains after Android claims over 80% of all smart phones sold each year. Apple is certainly the world leader in marketing, which is why you probably think it is a leading provider, but the reality is that the open systems it has competed against have always outsold them by factors of 8 to 20.

Even so, the Apple story is a good one, but you have to wait nine hours to reach it in this book.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Midnight Dog of the Repo Man

  • By: W. Bruce Cameron
  • Narrated by: George K. Wilson
  • Length: 1 hr and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 193
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 179
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 178

This short story introduces former college football star turned repo man Ruddy McCann, star of W. Bruce Cameron’s new novel The Midnight Plan of the Repo Man, and tells how Ruddy met his best friend Jake, a lazy but lovable basset hound, during a repo gone wrong. Full of laugh-out-loud humor and thrilling adventure, "The Midnight Dog of the Repo Man" is a page-turning, delightful short story.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Cute short story!

  • By Wayne on 03-27-16

Fun Short Prequel

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-31-19

How Ruddy got the dog. This short prequel to The Midnight Plan of the Repo Man and its ongoing series introduces Ruddy McCann and his job as a repo man and bar bouncer in the Michigan Northwoods, and shows us how his basset hound Jake came into his life. Of course there has to be a dog, this being Bruce Cameron, author of A Dog's Purpose. Succinct, to the point, and fun.

  • Two Kinds of Truth

  • By: Michael Connelly
  • Narrated by: Titus Welliver
  • Length: 9 hrs and 55 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,982
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,104
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,049

Harry Bosch is back as a volunteer working cold cases for the San Fernando Police Department and is called out to a local drugstore where a young pharmacist has been murdered. Bosch and the town's three-person detective squad sift through the clues, which lead into the dangerous, big business world of pill mills and prescription drug abuse.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Bosch Survives Two Career Ending Threats

  • By Russell on 11-20-17

One Kind of Bosch

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-20-19

Two Kinds of Truth starts out with Harry Bosch looking into a cold case, a long unsolved murder, but very quickly, a cold case comes looking for Bosch -- not a cold case, exactly, an old case, in which a murderer he helped convict now has exculpatory evidence and accusations of malfeasance against him. And then, in the very next moment, a hot case falls into Bosch's lap when a father and son team of pharmacists are gunned down in their store.

In his 20th novel, 25 years after he first appeared, Bosch is getting old -- he's semi-retired and even less inclined to put up with everyone else's BS than he ever was. Up until this entry, the series was starting to show its age too, the latest entries that I read (#17 and #19) barely average, just going through the motions. But in this one, Bosch is back -- or more precisely, Connelly is back, back to top form.

This time, it works. The stories mesh quite well, Bosch does something quite new for him, and one of the main themes is quite timely, showing several sides of the opioid addiction crisis, including an unexpected angle that indicts the entire system -- this is not really part of the plot, just Bosch's (and Connelly's) observations on some of the more nuanced aspects of the issue.

It certainly doesn't hurt that Bosch's half-brother Mickey Haller, the Lincoln Lawyer, makes more than a mere cameo appearance, pretty much stealing the show over the last couple of hours. And it certainly doesn't hurt that Titus Welliver, who plays Bosch on TV, has finally warmed up to the task of narrating the novels, his voice much warmer and less intrusive. Any series is going to have its ups and downs, especially one of this length. This one is definitely an up.