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  • 4
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  • 13
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  • 22
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  • Dark Matter

  • A Novel
  • By: Blake Crouch
  • Narrated by: Jon Lindstrom
  • Length: 10 hrs and 8 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16,313
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 14,995
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 14,994

"Are you happy with your life?" Those are the last words Jason Dessen hears before the masked abductor knocks him unconscious. Before he awakens to find himself strapped to a gurney, surrounded by strangers in hazmat suits. Before a man Jason's never met smiles down at him and says, "Welcome back, my friend."

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Believable Multiverse

  • By Michael L. Moore on 02-18-17

If Deepak Chopra would write Sci-Fi...

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-26-17

What would have made Dark Matter better?

Better story

What was most disappointing about Blake Crouch’s story?

I will get some good Sci-Fi. What I've got is some really boring narrative modelled to make a point similar to what made Deepak Chopra a walking joke.

How did the narrator detract from the book?

The narration is absolutely awful. The narrator is trying hard to make everything bigger and bolder and it sounds like 3 lb of cheese.

  • Antifragile

  • Things That Gain from Disorder
  • By: Nassim Nicholas Taleb
  • Narrated by: Joe Ochman
  • Length: 16 hrs and 14 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,736
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,179
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,168

In The Black Swan Taleb outlined a problem, and in Antifragile he offers a definitive solution: how to gain from disorder and chaos while being protected from fragilities and adverse events. For what Taleb calls the "antifragile" is actually beyond the robust, because it benefits from shocks, uncertainty, and stressors, just as human bones get stronger when subjected to stress and tension. The antifragile needs disorder in order to survive and flourish. Taleb stands uncertainty on its head, making it desirable, even necessary, and proposes that things be built in an antifragile manner.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Some good ideas, smart guy, not smart as HE thinks

  • By Philo on 12-24-12

Boring and pathetic

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-02-17

Would you try another book from Nassim Nicholas Taleb and/or Joe Ochman?

No

What reaction did this book spark in you? Anger, sadness, disappointment?

Boredom

Any additional comments?

The book is basically a rehash of Black Swan combined with nonstop trolling of as many people and groups as it can be possible. Nothing new, people like Ayn Rand do it to generate "controversy" and promote substanceless books.

  • The Everything Store

  • Jeff Bezos and the Age of Amazon
  • By: Brad Stone
  • Narrated by: Pete Larkin
  • Length: 13 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,839
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,453
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,471

Amazon.com started off delivering books through the mail. But its visionary founder, Jeff Bezos, wasn't content with being a bookseller. He wanted Amazon to become the everything store, offering limitless selection and seductive convenience at disruptively low prices. To do so, he developed a corporate culture of relentless ambition and secrecy that's never been cracked. Until now.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Loved the honesty!

  • By Paul on 01-29-14

Jeff Bezos is a superman

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-15-13

Would you try another book from Brad Stone and/or Pete Larkin?

I realize that Jeff Bezos is a uniquely talented individual with unmatched list of accomplishments. I also realize that Jeff Bezos is very private person and does not reveal his struggles to outside world.

Problem with the book is that Jeff Bezos is presented as a comics superman character. Even Ayn Rand's hypothetical business titans had more emotions and struggles than Jeff Bezos in this book.

It seems there only 3 emotional states for him:
- cold calculating machine, who can school math PhD's on why their algorithms would not work
- wrath expressed in a vein on a forehead, which happens the moment an employee said something less than a genius. Usually happens right before he "bites his head off" or makes someone a "second asshole".
- diabolical laugh.
I would love to see Marvell's take on it.

I'm also concerned about the way story describes early days of amazon. It seems that all it took is some code to build a first version of a web site.
As long as you have a website and you can send a link to a few friends, you "purchase announcement" bell will start ringing.

13 of 15 people found this review helpful

  • The Facebook Effect

  • The Inside Story of the Company That Is Connecting the World
  • By: David Kirkpatrick
  • Narrated by: David Kirkpatrick
  • Length: 15 hrs and 42 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 683
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 351
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 350

In little more than half a decade, Facebook has gone from a dorm-room novelty to a company with 500 million users. It is one of the fastest growing companies in history, an essential part of the social life not only of teenagers but hundreds of millions of adults worldwide. As Facebook spreads around the globe, it creates surprising effects, even becoming instrumental in political protests from Colombia to Iran.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Great history, poor analysis. TERRIBLE recording.

  • By Kenneth on 08-22-10

Fascinating book

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-29-10

The book is absolutely fascinating story of the facebook development and success. The author is absolutely amazingly describes the atmosphere, the chronology, the details and the thoughts around creation the facebook. Author helps understand the reasons and the thought process behind facebook success.