LISTENER

Kojo

  • 6
  • reviews
  • 2
  • helpful votes
  • 12
  • ratings
  • Dream Hoarders

  • How the American Upper Middle Class Is Leaving Everyone Else in the Dust, Why That Is a Problem, and What to Do About It
  • By: Richard V. Reeves
  • Narrated by: Richard V. Reeves
  • Length: 4 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 111
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 98
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 93

As Reeves shows, the growing separation between the upper middle class and everyone else can be seen in family structure, neighborhoods, attitudes, and lifestyle. Those at the top of the income ladder are becoming more effective at passing on their status to their children, reducing overall social mobility. The result is not just an economic divide but a fracturing of American society along class lines. Upper-middle-class children become upper-middle-class adults.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Don’t feel that privileged

  • By jeffrey a dabe on 01-04-18

The Upper Middle Class still thinks they’re “struggling”

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-13-17

Despite improving financial conditions, lots of Upper Middle Class folks (the author uses Top 20% of incomes, I’d say Top 30-40%) still think they’re struggling to stay afloat. I think this is part of the reason so many are willing to support policies that bolster the rich (whom they aspire to join) and ignore the poor (who they’re trying to avoid becoming).

I’m not sure how viable his policy ideas are, but it’s a very interesting look at a key part of the American demographic.

  • Grit

  • The Power of Passion and Perseverance
  • By: Angela Duckworth
  • Narrated by: Angela Duckworth
  • Length: 9 hrs and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 14,346
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12,502
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12,420

In this must-listen book for anyone striving to succeed, pioneering psychologist Angela Duckworth shows parents, educators, students, and businesspeople - both seasoned and new - that the secret to outstanding achievement is not talent but a focused persistence called "grit". Why do some people succeed and others fail? Sharing new insights from her landmark research on grit, MacArthur "genius" Angela Duckworth explains why talent is hardly a guarantor of success.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • A 9 hour commencement address

  • By Grimjack on 05-13-18

An excellent look at a key factor to success; a key flaw

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-01-17

It's not just "talent", but how much you're willing to WORK that often determines your success.

Some of the examples didn't QUITE ring true to me. The Steve Young story stands out. Grit surely helped him become a standout QB at BYU, but so did having a DAD who'd been a standout BYU QB. Even if his dad had the time & willingness to help Steve (some parents lack either or both, as the author noted), his dad knew almost EXACTLY HOW to help him. Having a parent who's been a top performer in you want to excel in seems to outweigh "grit". It gets to the "have a plan, show them how" mentioned by Pete Carroll. Without someone to do that, even MORE "grit" is required. There was at least one other example where I thought, "Hmm...that's a situational quirk, not just replicable "grit".

Despite a few examples like that, I think the overall premise and it's description was excellent. I especially liked the discussion of "deliberate practice". My next book will be Cal Newport's "Deep Work", to dive into this topic more & get some operational tips. I may re-read "So Good They Can't Ignore You".

I also appreciated the discussion of helping OTHERS develop more grit, for parents, teachers, managers, etc.

  • The Warmth of Other Suns

  • The Epic Story of America's Great Migration
  • By: Isabel Wilkerson
  • Narrated by: Robin Miles, Ken Burns (introduction)
  • Length: 22 hrs and 43 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,147
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 3,690
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,677

In this epic, beautifully written masterwork, Pulitzer Prize–winning author Isabel Wilkerson chronicles one of the great untold stories of American history: the decades-long migration of black citizens who fled the South for northern and western cities in search of a better life. From 1915 to 1970, this exodus of almost six million people changed the face of America. Wilkerson interviewed more than a thousand people, and gained access to previously untapped data and official records, to write this definitive and vividly dramatic account of how these American journeys unfolded, altering our cities, our country, and ourselves.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Superior non-fiction

  • By Lila on 05-20-11

An in-depth examination of an overlooked part of history.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-17-17

Like the author, I grew up in Washington, DC. So, I knew of the people who'd left the south (S. Carolina in my grandmother's case) to come north. But I hadn't realized how MANY black people left the south, how FAR they'd gone across the country, or how widespread their impact had been.

I remember seeing an interview with Snoop Dogg where he mentioned his mother's family coming from Mississippi. I realized the black migration had more of an impact than I thought. The stories and details in this book helped me fill in the gaps that existed about something that greatly impacted my family and my own life. It gave me a new perspective on what my grandmother went through so my mother, aunts, uncles & cousins could all have better lives.

  • Hidden Figures

  • The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Helped Win the Space Race
  • By: Margot Lee Shetterly
  • Narrated by: Robin Miles
  • Length: 10 hrs and 47 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 6,751
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,134
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,163

Before John Glenn orbited the Earth or Neil Armstrong walked on the moon, a group of dedicated female mathematicians known as "human computers" used pencils, slide rules, and adding machines to calculate the numbers that would launch rockets and astronauts into space. Among these problem solvers were a group of exceptionally talented African American women, some of the brightest minds of their generation.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Interesting Subject

  • By Jami on 02-05-18

History often holds great Stories

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-26-17

I got this boom after seeing the movie, wanting the added details I knew the film had to skip or compress. I wasn't disappointed.

I'd recommend this to anyone with an interest in the history of America's technological development, especially as it pertains to our space program or our terrestrial aeronautics industry.

I'd also recommend it to anyone from an underrepresented group that's looking to get into a tech-based career. The people highlighted here had it MUCH harder than we do in 2017, and they succeeded at VERY high levels. But not without a LOT of hard work and perseverance, even in the face of overwhelming odds.

The narrator did an excellent job and never seemed "in the way" of the story being told.

2 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up

  • The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing
  • By: Marie Kondo
  • Narrated by: Emily Woo Zeller
  • Length: 4 hrs and 50 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 21,732
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 18,766
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 18,541

Despite constant efforts to declutter your home, do papers still accumulate like snowdrifts and clothes pile up like a tangled mess of noodles?Japanese cleaning consultant Marie Kondo takes tidying to a whole new level, promising that if you properly simplify and organize your home once, you'll never have to do it again. Most methods advocate a room-by-room or little-by-little approach, which doom you to pick away at your piles of stuff forever.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I both love and hate this life changing book

  • By Rebecca on 02-22-15

Simple and effective advice

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-18-16

Why be surrounded by things you don't REALLY care about or enjoy? Make room for the rest of your life.

I got this as I was preparing to move. Although I already knew the basic ideas, she provided just enough extra detail to be valuable.

  • The Fellowship of the Ring

  • Book One in The Lord of the Rings Trilogy
  • By: J. R. R. Tolkien
  • Narrated by: Rob Inglis
  • Length: 19 hrs and 7 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 29,471
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 26,933
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 27,032

The Fellowship of the Ring, the first volume in the trilogy, tells of the fateful power of the One Ring. It begins a magnificent tale of adventure that will plunge the members of the Fellowship of the Ring into a perilous quest and set the stage for the ultimate clash between the powers of good and evil.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • At last - The Definitive Recording!

  • By L. N. on 10-10-12

An excellent reading of an excellent text

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-05-15

While not a "dramatization", the book is read with distinction b/w characters and a reflection of their moods at the time. I see why this is the most-loved audio version.