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Gigi Grimm

  • 2
  • reviews
  • 8
  • helpful votes
  • 2
  • ratings
  • No Visible Bruises

  • What We Don't Know About Domestic Violence Can Kill Us
  • By: Rachel Louise Snyder
  • Narrated by: Rachel Louise Snyder
  • Length: 11 hrs and 54 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 161
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 152
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 150

We call it domestic violence. We call it private violence. Sometimes we call it intimate terrorism. But whatever we call it, we generally do not believe it has anything at all to do with us, despite the World Health Organization deeming it a 'global epidemic'. In No Visible Bruises, journalist Rachel Louise Snyder gives context for what we don't know we're seeing. She frames this urgent and immersive account of the scale of domestic violence in our country around key stories that explode the common myths....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Amazing

  • By Gigi Grimm on 05-11-19

Amazing

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-11-19

This book is a great view inside Domestic Violence and shows a lot of the ways the system is lacking on providing help, support, and care for all victims. It give me a lot of great program ideas. I was in a Domestic Violence relationship and it gave me a lot of ideas on things that I would like to implement in my area for survivors and offenders a like. I have also had a few ideas of things to implement for children of Domestic Violence thanks to the need in my area and the book. I am currently working to become a advocate for victims and survivors a like.

8 of 8 people found this review helpful

  • Avery

  • The Case Against Steven Avery and What Making a Murderer Gets Wrong
  • By: Ken Kratz
  • Narrated by: Bradley Hayes
  • Length: 4 hrs and 50 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 119
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 110
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 109

The Netflix series Making a Murderer quickly became a huge hit, with over 19 million viewers in the US in the first 35 days. The series left many viewers with the opinion that Steven Avery - a man falsely imprisoned for almost 20 years on a rape charge - was railroaded into prison a second time by a corrupt police force and district attorney's office. Viewers were outraged, and hundreds of thousands demanded a pardon for Avery. The chief villain of the series: Ken Kratz, the special prosecutor who headed the investigation and prosecution.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Disappointed

  • By Amazon Customer on 04-02-17

Kratz pity party.

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-09-18

The author dedicated entire chapters to incite a giant pity party. The so called "facts" are outdated so is his oh the police didn't frame Avery. These ideas have already been set aside. The newest theory is Bobby Dassey framed Avery. Kratz should have focused only on the case and not include the things he had happen to him. if he wanted to make a book to complain about threats, and to discuss his repulsive behavior while DA of Calumet County he should have written an auto biography. Instead he disguised it in a book that is half the Avery case and half a pity party for himself. He only focuses on the original defense teams blunders which they've already admitted was ineffective assistance of counsel it really was just a waste of a book.