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Pimpernel Sandybanks

Santa Cruz
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  • reviews
  • 6
  • helpful votes
  • 130
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  • Homo Deus

  • A Brief History of Tomorrow
  • By: Yuval Noah Harari
  • Narrated by: Derek Perkins
  • Length: 14 hrs and 54 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12,699
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 11,302
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11,209

Yuval Noah Harari, author of the critically acclaimed New York Times best seller and international phenomenon Sapiens, returns with an equally original, compelling, and provocative book, turning his focus toward humanity's future and our quest to upgrade humans into gods.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Good, but...

  • By Josh on 07-14-18

insightful look re trends that will effect future

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-06-17

This is a broad, ambitious book. Yuval doesn't attempt to describe any given devices or technology in a Kurzweillian way. Instead he describes where humans are coming from and where we're going. He does this through a systems view. How our systems (social and political and philosophical) have been shaped in the past and uses that as a tensor for predicting future shapes for those systems. I like all of this. Yuval does this from as detached a way as is reasonably possible. My minor gripe is that the predictive surface is uneven, he seems to predict where individuals will head given an increased flow of easily accessible information, but fails to describe a post-liberal society. To me this seems like he's shrugging his shoulders at the forces in play, and I would have liked to see a couple likely directions.

  • Thank You for Being Late

  • An Optimist's Guide to Thriving in the Age of Accelerations
  • By: Thomas L. Friedman
  • Narrated by: Oliver Wyman
  • Length: 19 hrs and 47 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,718
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,412
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,402

In his most ambitious work to date, Thomas L. Friedman shows that we have entered an age of dizzying acceleration - and explains how to live in it. Due to an exponential increase in computing power, climbers atop Mount Everest enjoy excellent cell phone service, and self-driving cars are taking to the roads. A parallel explosion of economic interdependency has created new riches as well as spiraling debt burdens.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • It really is an optimists guide to scary stuff

  • By Adam Shields on 12-12-16

If this is an optimist's guide we're screwed

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-22-17

The picture painted by Thomas Friedman in this book is that we're moving into an age where security is a historical artifact is frankly terrifying. If you want to be relevant in the future you need to study, work and network all the time, If you're sleeping 8 hours a day then you've already lost. Somebody else is sleeping 4 and . The list of *must do* habits (not things you need to do once, but changes that you need to wrap your life around) are long and complex. I've read other reviews that suggested the message of the book was "you're going to be ok"... I don't think they read or listened to this book. Thomas's intent to be realistic makes this a frightening picture. His common sense list of 18 things the American government should do... did you get that 18 things. None of which is going to happen any time soon. He has similar lists for what individuals need to do. His recollections and revisiting the idealic microcosm of his childhood shouldn't allay any concerns, the area of the country he talks about is all but gone, it's effectively fantasy...you can see this when he talks about neighboring areas that don't share the same strength of community.

  • F*ck Feelings

  • One Shrink's Practical Advice for Managing All Life's Impossible Problems
  • By: Michael Bennett MD, Sarah Bennett
  • Narrated by: Patrick Lawlor
  • Length: 12 hrs and 43 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 431
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 379
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 377

Other self-help books claim to reveal the path to happiness, but F*ck Feelings warns that convincing yourself that there is such a path will actually lead you to feel like a true failure. What the Bennetts can promise you is that you can manage any situation life throws at you if you can keep your sense of humor, bend your wishes to fit reality, restrain your feelings, manage bad behavior, and do what you think is right.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Insightful, But Not Meant For Audio

  • By Trevor on 11-27-15

Delivers value

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-13-16

While I tired of Bennett's ongoing mad-lib, fill in the blank style, the substance that he provides is clear and cogent.

1 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Daily Self-Discipline

  • Everyday Habits and Exercises to Build Self-Discipline and Achieve Your Goals
  • By: Martin Meadows
  • Narrated by: John Gagnepain
  • Length: 2 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,258
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1,855
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,852

Do you make goals yet get discouraged when your plans don't work? We all know those people who seemingly were born to succeed. Fitness, health, business - they achieve all their goals. You want that success and know you can get it... but how?

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Better Title: "The Catch-22 of Self-Discipline"

  • By Doc on 08-18-16

Solid material presented for the time starved

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-26-16

I gave this three stars because there was nothing new here for me. However, I think the value proposition that Mr Meadows presents is intriguing. He is taking the best of what works out of a lot of more comes materials and breaking it down for smaller audiences or audiences with more limited time or narrower focus.

  • Project Management

  • Failed Healthcare IT Project Business Cases, a Career Guide to Lessons Learned
  • By: Natalie Disque
  • Narrated by: Paula Slade
  • Length: 1 hr and 30 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars 1
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars 1
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars 1

Healthcare is a big business and is only continuing to grow. Because of this, technology must adapt and transform to meet the needs of the public. Failed healthcare IT projects are nothing new. However, they surely are something that can be learned from. In every failure is a lesson that can be used for a future project - a lesson that can help to save, or better, someone else's life.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Unclear Business Cases, weak lessons learned

  • By Pimpernel Sandybanks on 02-18-16

Unclear Business Cases, weak lessons learned

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-18-16

Lessons learned means finger pointing at stakeholders. The lessons learned aren't brought to enough detail to actually be helpful to anyone unless they have no experience with project management. Stakeholders, unless they've worked in IT cannot imagine the complexity of IT projects. Stakeholder "buy in" cannot exist without an understanding of that complexity. The books early mapping of IT projects to construction project is glossed over and can span the length of a book this size. While not entirely inaccurate it doesn't map to the reality of IT projects. Requirements for IT projects are enormously complex and they shift rapidly, at the core of these requirements are user level requirements. While this is brought up for Google health, it's ignored for most of the projects.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Industries of the Future

  • By: Alec Ross
  • Narrated by: Alec Ross
  • Length: 8 hrs and 48 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,233
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,923
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,904

Leading innovation expert Alec Ross explains what's next for the world, mapping out the advances and stumbling blocks that will emerge in the next 10 years - for businesses, governments, and the global community - and how we can navigate them.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Ok review of what is now. Not much future.

  • By Sam on 05-06-16

Adapt or perish

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-10-16

I think Alex is right about a lot of the book, but the idea that little Silicon Valleys are going to spring up where there is domain expertise seems unlikely. The knowledge to build those big data systems is moving too fast to distribute, there are dozens of Apache projects that need to play well together for this to happen. For those with domain expertise to build on it the rate of technology change would have to slow down...otherwise you need a critical mass of big data experts. That seems to be the domain of Silicon Valley and the author doesn't propose a way for it to change, or a hypothesis for big data technology to plateau for some time.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • The Diamond Age

  • By: Neal Stephenson
  • Narrated by: Jennifer Wiltsie
  • Length: 18 hrs and 32 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 5,778
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,607
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 3,626

Neal Stephenson, "the hottest science fiction writer in America", takes science fiction to dazzling new levels. The Diamond Age is a stunning tale; set in 21st-century Shanghai, it is the story of what happens what a state-of-the-art interactive device falls into the hands of a street urchin named Nell. Her life, and the entire future of humanity, is about to be decoded and reprogrammed.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • The rock could use a bit more polishing

  • By Tango on 05-19-13

Listened to again after 8 years

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-04-16

Stephenson creates compelling worlds, where technology and society co-evolve, where he can project forward todays youth into tomorrows senior citizens in a compelling way. He does so by making the society and it's idiosyncrasies the primary character and the personalities that occupy it as secondary. Stephenson doesn't treat the technology as a character, but as backdrop, but it is still characterized in a compelling way.