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Jose

  • 8
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  • 123
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  • 18
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Overall a great novel!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-21-18

This wasn’t a page turner. But it did satisfy my penchant for characters that exhibit skill, discipline, taste, intelligence, wit, and more. I would recommend this novel to those that have an interest in Japanese culture.

I was a bit disappointed with the ending and expected a bit more considering the lead up was so well developed.

Sure You're Joking is much better.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-29-16

What do you care what people think repeats some stories from surely you're joking, but it also has a few new stories. Most of this book is dominated by Feynman's participation in the space shuttle challenger crash investigation commission. It involves his interactions with people, his thoughts on technical details of the topic, and he finally expands on what this all means in the bigger picture. It's a bit long and dry. And if you're interested in this then it may suit you. But I am more interested in Feynman's personal side and ideological thoughts.

I've read Surely You're Joking, The Pleasure of Finding Things Out, and this book (What Do You Care). And I've listed them in order of preference.

114 of 119 people found this review helpful

A Man Called Ove audiobook cover art

A book about having morals and values in a modern world.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-04-16

This is the type of book that makes you appreciate life and all its complexities.

Wow

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-02-16

This reads like a movie. He takes you on a trip with him from a lost young man to a grey old man, and the life that happened in between.

What I love about the book is that he shares his inner thought process. He doesn't just recount the facts or events. He tells you what he was feeling and what he was thinking at the time.

He offers advise. And inspires risk taking. He highlights the importance of the people in your life and the importance of finding a calling. And if I understood correctly, you find a calling not by thinking and discovering it in your mind. You have to experience life. You have to throw yourself at life and try things out. Move from one to the next. At some point your will stand atop a hill looking down and realizing that you found it.

Amazing book. Bravo!

Great value. Entertaining. Engaging and inspiring.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-19-15

I've read many self-development books. Most SD books jump from principle to principle without much context to which the principles can attach. I've read everything from Jim Rohn, Cal Newport, Malcolm Gladwell, and many more. The point is I've read many authors of many styles. The Richest Man In Babylon (TRMIB), is by far the most engaging.

Some might condemn it for its simplicity or parable style, but it's simplicity is what makes its impact so effective. With it you get principles of character, money, and living life. Many won't agree with the principles and that's fine. No one set of principles is agreeable to all.

If you live self-development books and enjoy stories like the Alchemist by Paulo Coelho, then you will probably enjoy this book. It's a gem. I will buy the print version and keep it in my library.

The Compound Effect audiobook cover art

Reads like a traditional motivational book

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-29-15

This is a collection of stories about successful people and some metaphors sprinkled throughout. The author also espouses some principles which are common sense but good to hear as they freshen your recollection of them.

The author looks up to Jim Rohn and you can tell. Overall it wasn't anything new (I've read many other books in the same genre) but he is easy to listen to and clear cut in his message. This makes it enjoyable.

Repeats common info from other books

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-08-15

This book provides the reader with many ideas for creating a daily routine. However, the book doesn't really go into depth on the mechanics of building a daily routine. Instead, it gives you general information about human behavior that should be considered when creating a routine. Much of this information comes from other self help books. In fact, I felt like I was listening to a summary of many other books and not hearing much original content.

If you've read other books on habit making, willpower, or mindfulness, then you will probably learn nothing new here.

The narration is actually pleasant and it moves along nicely. However, at times, the book's organization seems disjointed. This is definitely not a $10 audiobook. If you are really interested, I suggest you save yourself money and pay for the $.99 kindle version instead. It's a short read anyway.

9 of 9 people found this review helpful

Reads like a long pep talk

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-16-15

Use failure to fuel your journey. Make sure you know how to recognize failure. Michael Jordan and Twitter failed but then succeeded. AOL didn't recognize failure so it failed. Those are the main points I took from the book.

The content is extremely shallow. It reads more like a long locker room pep talk than a book. You can find YouTube videos with similar content. No real original ideas. Narrator is okay.