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Greg

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pedantic

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-29-17

You may as well have someone read an algebra text book to you. This book is as moving as having a cavity filled.

0 of 11 people found this review helpful

This Author Does Not Understand Art

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-12-17

This person has a very pedantic understanding of art, which frankly, most often misses the point altogether. I disagree with much of his thesis as well regarding why we love great art, our purpose for creating it, and what more or less defines art.

If given the opportunity to do it over again I would not waste my time or money on this one.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

A Nightmare For Our Daughters and Sons

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-29-16

This book was thought provoking and engaging. As a father of a 14 year old son and 12 year old daughter I can't help but worry some for both of my kids in the years to come. I was disturbed obviously by the men who raped. Rape is rape; it is an absolutely horrible thing to do. I'm petrified for my daughter. I was also disturbed by the incredibly poor choices some of the women made. There is a grey area of accountability for one's own actions here where the author clearly takes sides with the women. I would weight my position that way too. Yet, I think he failed to discuss in depth the male's point of view within these gray areas where some of these women were at minimum naively confusing the situation with their actions and words. I think his position is helpful in pointing out the problem but not in helping to reduce its future occurrence. In failing to address this he is in a sense saying a woman's version of "boys will be boys". That is, that regardless of what questionable circumstance I put myself in before harm is done to me and regardless of what I said beforehand I bear no responsibility for harm happening to me. This attitude does not negate the crime committed by the male but it certainly helps to understand how the crime can happen at the alarming rate it seems to be.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

Outstanding Book

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-02-14

This is a very practical book of how spiritually and scientifically the teachings of the Bible come together via reincarnation and how on a practical level they can be observed in every day life. The book does not make the case through scripture but through logic. If you want a very strong case made scripturally using the Bible for reincarnation the most profound and brilliant book available is "Why Jesus Taught Reincarnation" by Dr. Herbert Puryear. It is not available in audio but reading it will be time extremely well spent.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

It's like being told how to parent by a non-parent

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-18-14

Bless his heart for trying but Mr. Rohr is too blind to his own narrow world, too confused by economics, too presumptive of other people's inner worlds and incredibly arrogant and distorted by his own Catholic lens. Mr. Rohr touches on some bits of truth but they are so tainted by his own lack of experience. Perhaps the Catholic priests should get married and have children, work and live outside of their castles in order to make a living so that they could get down off their high horse and actually have some practical understanding of what it means to find that still, quiet place inside even amidst the madness of the world.

If you would like a fantastic book on Christian Mysticism (which is what Richard Rohr is attempting to teach here even if he doesn't know it) listen to "Resurrecting Jesus, Embodying the Spirit of a Revolutionary Mystic" by Adyashanti. He has a much better understanding of the mystery—of Jesus—and his book is not political.

2 of 16 people found this review helpful

Narration will drive you mad. It's ironic but true

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-16-14

I'm about half way through this book and while I think it has some good things to say the narrator has one cadence and only one cadence. She never pauses, and she reads complicated passes too quickly to give you time to process and think on them. It's a bit like listening to a computer read to you. In a book like this where the nuances of voice and pause make all the difference it'll drive you mad. Perhaps it's intended and the mystic should have a quiet enough mind to handle it. Fair enough, but life itself can challenge you on this daily. No need to listen to this book for that experience.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

Outstanding Interpretation of the Bible

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-24-14

This is one of the few books (particularly in audio) that interprets the New Testament of the Bible from a Christian Mystic's point of view. The messages are profound and current even though the Mystics are older than the Bible. I liked Resurrecting Jesus a lot better than "Falling Into Grace" also by Adyashanti.

There's only one book on this subject that I have found more profound: "Why Jesus Taught Reincarnation" By Dr. Herb Puryear. Unfortunately it is not available in audio. "Resurrecting Jesus", however, is a much easier read (listen) because it is less about making a solid intellectual case for the understanding of Jesus's teaching and more about the spirituality of it.

Enjoy.

5 of 7 people found this review helpful

Fairly well written but depressing

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-02-14

This book is well written in that it is informative and insightful of the painter's life. However, beware that Picasso himself led the life of an over indulged child who never grew up. He was perhaps the first pop-star. I had a hard time getting through it, sort of like reading about Justin Beiber in that in retrospect of his life his actions become predictable and pathetic and his mission is not about art but only about himself. He embodied so much of what is wrong in society and much of art today. I've seen good paintings by him in person and wanted to look fairly at what he brought to the table: Seems like a net loss to me.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

Very little on Klimt.

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-09-14

This is a disjointed story. There's a fair amount of history in here, enough different interests for a few different books. Very little on Klimt and what went into the painting from an artistic standpoint. As an artist myself, I found this book lacking. We all know the painting is brilliant, but we want to know what it was like to be Klimt and paint it. I recommend, "Van Gogh, The Life" by Steven Naifeh and Gregory Smith. That is an outstanding book on an equally great artist.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

Entertaining but also O'Reilly's interpretations

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-09-14

It's not all history. O'Reilly makes several of his interpretations on the meaning written in the Bible in this book. One in particular that I didn't like was on Jesus's conversation in John 3. I think it's an entertaining, well written book, just with some of Bill's interpretations of meaning within the Bible. I'd still recommend listing to it if you're interested in Jesus.

11 of 13 people found this review helpful