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Abdur Abdul-Malik

Sacramento, CA USA
  • 21
  • reviews
  • 378
  • helpful votes
  • 244
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  • Reflex

  • By: Steven Gould
  • Narrated by: MacLeod Andrews
  • Length: 12 hrs and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,554
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,426
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,436

Davy has always been alone. He believes that he's the only person who can teleport. But what if he isn't? A mysterious group of people has taken Davy captive. They don't want to hire him, and they don't have any hope of appealing to him to help them. What they want is to own him. They want to use his abilities for their own purposes, whether Davy agrees to it or not. And so they set about brainwashing him and conditioning him. But there's one thing that they don't know....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Enjoyed this story

  • By AP on 09-04-12

One Early Plot Twist Was a Near Dealbreaker

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-23-18

***SPOILER ALERT***

Okay, warning duly noted. I was VERY upset that the author gave Millie the ability to jump. I literally stopped listening to the book and had to wait nearly a week before I was ready to forgive the author for doing that and resume progress.

I intellectually understand the argument, well, how does Davy do it? The idea that Millie's brain has been "trained" by thousands of guided jumps by her husband does make some sort of sense. But...it just didn't sit well with me. If this power is latent in the human mind, in all likelihood you would have a lot of teleporters like in the movie. I think I would have preferred Davy being the only one and NO real explanation for his powers given or even attempted. Sometimes, leaving mystery in is better. "2001 a Space Odyssey" was a better film than book since the film deliberately leaves out a lot of exposition. Star Wars went south when "miticholorians" reared their ugly head.

My literary ontology permitted ONE jumper in this particular universe. Two felt like one too much...

Overall, good book, though...

0 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Singularity Trap

  • By: Dennis E. Taylor
  • Narrated by: Ray Porter
  • Length: 11 hrs and 23 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 15,522
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 14,520
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 14,488

When Ivan Pritchard signs on as a newbie aboard the Mad Astra, it's his final, desperate stab at giving his wife and children the life they deserve. He can survive the hazing of his crewmates, and how many times, really, can near-zero g make you vomit? But there's another challenge looming out there, in the farthest reaches of human exploration, that will test every man, woman and AI on the ship - and will force Ivan to confront the very essence of what makes him human.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent.

  • By Amy Snider on 06-13-18

Not As Compelling as the Bobiverse

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-08-18

First off, I loved the Bobiverse and I think Dennis E. Taylor is a great addition to the world of sci-fi. That acknowledged, and it pains me to say this, The Singularity Trap is a miss. The narration is top-notch, but the story isn't arresting. I didn't make much of a connection with the protagonist. I also felt the dialogue wasn't riveting either. Too many times the author tells us the characters laughed at something I personally didn't laugh at. Also, referencing Star Trek was okay in the Bobiverse, but I cringed when it came up again in this book (even in passing). However, my central issue is the plot itself. I have read many books about the singularity and I don't feel the author portrayed the subject convincingly. The singularity is a huge idea, one that basically says no human being alive at this moment can fully comprehend what a post-human world would be like. It would be a universe of staggering complexity and wonders. Such grandeur wasn't really conveyed or even really hinted at. We have some gee-whiz moments, but not enough of them. This is a criticism that can be aimed at many authors. Read The Age of Spiritual Machines, Life 3.0, and Superintelligence, all non-fiction books. I wish more authors would borrow ideas from those tomes.

112 of 139 people found this review helpful

  • Childhood's End

  • By: Sir Arthur C. Clarke
  • Narrated by: Eric Michael Summerer, Robert J. Sawyer - introduction
  • Length: 7 hrs and 47 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 7,280
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,939
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 5,994

The Overlords appeared suddenly over every city - intellectually, technologically, and militarily superior to humankind. Benevolent, they made few demands: unify earth, eliminate poverty, and end war. With little rebellion, humankind agreed, and a golden age began.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Food for Thought

  • By Kindle Customer on 11-17-08

One of the Finest Science Fiction Novels Ever

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-23-18

In my opinion, this is Arthur C. Clarke's finest novel and ranks among the best science fiction novels written. EVER. It's hard to believe this was written in the early 1950's, before man walked the moon and when computers were the size of entire rooms.

The less you know about this novel before reading it, the better. Just add it to cart and get going!

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Door into Summer

  • By: Robert A. Heinlein
  • Narrated by: Patrick Lawlor
  • Length: 6 hrs and 48 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,050
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 706
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 724

Dan Davis, an electronics engineer, had finally made the invention of a lifetime: a household robot that could do almost anything. Wild success was within reach, but then Dan's life was ruined. In a plot to steal his business, his greedy partner and greedier fiancée tricked him into taking the "long sleep": suspended animation for 30 years.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • classic

  • By Greg on 04-05-09

Worth the Listen

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-26-18

This may not be one of Heinlein's best works, but it is entertaining and a breezy listen. It's interesting to see what the year 2000 was imagined to be like back in 1957.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Lathe of Heaven

  • By: Ursula K. Le Guin
  • Narrated by: George Guidall
  • Length: 6 hrs and 48 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 738
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 666
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 668

In a future world racked by violence and environmental catastrophes, George Orr wakes up one day to discover that his dreams have the ability to alter reality. He seeks help from Dr. William Haber, a psychiatrist who immediately grasps the power George wields. Soon George must preserve reality itself as Dr. Haber becomes adept at manipulating George's dreams for his own purposes.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Amazing!

  • By Adrienne R. on 11-23-18

Solid Le Guin Novel

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-12-17

Like all of Le Guin's works, this is very offbeat. The central character in the novel drove me a bit crazy, but that's intentional. He is presented as a deeply flawed figure who doesn't quite know how to handle the strange gifts he has been given. The ending is, in some ways, unsatisfying, but, again, I think that is intentional.

35 of 37 people found this review helpful

  • All These Worlds

  • Bobiverse, Book 3
  • By: Dennis E. Taylor
  • Narrated by: Ray Porter
  • Length: 7 hrs and 56 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 38,623
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 36,155
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 36,050

Being a sentient spaceship really should be more fun. But after spreading out through space for almost a century, Bob and his clones just can't stay out of trouble. They've created enough colonies so humanity shouldn't go extinct. But political squabbles have a bad habit of dying hard, and the Brazilian probes are still trying to take out the competition. And the Bobs have picked a fight with an older, more powerful species with a large appetite and a short temper.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Satisfying End to a Fun Series

  • By Craig Schorling on 08-20-17

A Breathe of Fresh Air

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-08-17

It took me years to discover the BBC's "Sherlock" when I did, there was 3 seasons for me to watch. I mainlined it.

I envy anyone who has the same pleasure going through this fantastic trilogy!

3 of 8 people found this review helpful

  • For We Are Many

  • Bobiverse, Book 2
  • By: Dennis E. Taylor
  • Narrated by: Ray Porter
  • Length: 8 hrs and 59 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 43,311
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 40,567
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 40,450

Bob Johansson didn't believe in an afterlife, so waking up after being killed in a car accident was a shock. To add to the surprise, he is now a sentient computer and the controlling intelligence for a Von Neumann probe.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Denis E.Taylor Sets A New Standard For Sci-Fi

  • By Devin on 04-18-17

Hopelessly Addicted

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-25-17

This series is fantastic. The second book felt like it got a slower start but it really kept ramping up. Eagerly looking forward to the 3rd installment!

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Driverless

  • Intelligent Cars and the Road Ahead
  • By: Hod Lipson, Melba Kurman
  • Narrated by: George Newbern
  • Length: 9 hrs and 57 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 104
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 86
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 86

In this book, Hod Lipson and Melba Kurman offer listeners insight into the risks and benefits of driverless cars, and a lucid and engaging explanation of the enabling technology. Recent advances in software and robotics are toppling long-standing technological barriers that for decades have confined self-driving cars to the realm of fantasy. A new kind of artificial intelligence software called deep learning gives cars rapid and accurate visual perception. Human drivers can relax and take their eyes off the road.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Amazing book, a clear view of the future

  • By Slysne on 07-10-17

Excellent Overview of Current State of Driverless Cars

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-27-17

Solid introduction to the tech behind and history of driverless cars. There are a number of interesting sections regarding the possible impacts to the economy, insurance industry, codification of the value of human life, and ethics of machines making life-or-death decisions. The narrator is great and the book will fly (drive?) by.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Understanding the Mysteries of Human Behavior

  • By: Mark Leary, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: Mark Leary
  • Length: 12 hrs and 11 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,058
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,800
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,779

Every day of your life is spent surrounded by mysteries that involve what appear to be rather ordinary human behaviors. What makes you happy? Where did your personality come from? Why do you have trouble controlling certain behaviors? Why do you behave differently as an adult than you did as an adolescent?Since the start of recorded history, and probably even before, people have been interested in answering questions about why we behave the way we do.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Nowhere near the depth of typical Great Courses

  • By BryanW on 04-05-14

Excellent Introductory Course

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-30-17

The professor does a fine job introducing a number of topics to the lay person. I particularly enjoyed the lecture on the Ganzfeld experiments. I had never even heard of it prior to the lecture. He does a good job highlighting the interesting (and contradictory) results of that and similar experiments.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Means of Ascent

  • The Years of Lyndon Johnson
  • By: Robert A. Caro
  • Narrated by: Grover Gardner
  • Length: 22 hrs and 8 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 1,287
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 1,151
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 1,153

Robert A. Caro's life of Lyndon Johnson continues - one of the richest, most intensive, and most revealing examinations ever undertaken of an American President. The Pulitzer Prize-winning biographer/historian carries Johnson through his service in World War II and the foundation of his long-concealed fortune and the facts behind the myths he created about it. But the explosive heart of the book is Caro's revelation of the true story of the fiercely contested 1948 senatorial election.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • LBJ and the New Politics

  • By George on 05-02-14

"If You Do Everything, You'll Win"

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-29-13

The second installment of Robert Caro's "The Years of Lyndon Johnson" is, in essence, an exposé.

Robert Caro's almost singular focus on LBJ--he has spent over 40 years chronicling events of the 36th president's life--has resulted in Robert Caro himself becoming part of the story. He has been accused of bias and thinly veiled contempt, for going out of his way to make his subject a caricature and a spectacle for his readers. While I do not agree with such assessments, this volume is Exhibit A for Johnson apologists who prefer to view the 36th president through rose-colored glasses.

Caro is very careful to document Johnson’s monumental impact on the body politic and recognizes that he is a seminal figure in American history. There are noble achievements that are diligently fleshed out and contextualized for the reader in order for their remarkability to be noted. In the first volume (The Path to Power) he shows how Johnson transformed the lives of poor farmers in the Texas hill country by means of rural electrification. In the third volume (Master of the Senate-broken up into three volumes here on Audible) he shows how Johnson tamed the nearly ungovernable Senate to have the first civil rights legislation passed in nearly a century at that time. In the fourth volume he shows how Johnson was the one who made Kennedy’s idealism begin to have concrete legislative movement once the presidency devolved to him and he occupied the oval office. However, Caro freely admits to the reader in the second volume that the complex alternation of light and dark is not present during this segment of Johnson’s life. It’s all dark.

This volume is a story of Johnson’s time in the military (Johnson saw one day of actual combat and only as an observer); how Johnson used political influence to amass an immense fortune (when Johnson became president he may have been the richest man to do so up to that point); and how Johnson won the democratic primary for the open senate seat in 1948. In a one-party state as Texas was at that time, winning the primary was tantamount to winning the election. (I leave it to the listener to find out how he did that.) And, sadly, Johnson’s treatment of his wife, Lady Bird, is on full display here and will make the listener wince--often.

All that being said, this volume is so funny in spots I needed a tissue to wipe the tears from my eyes. There is a reason Caro has devoted most of his professional life writing about Lyndon Baines Johnson: he is a complex man, a larger-than-life figure, a man with an indomitable will to power, a man who wanted the presidency his entire life, a man who said, “If you do everything, you’ll win” and DID do everything. The roman orator Cicero wrote that no immoral act can be expedient. Johnson did NOT read Cicero…

32 of 34 people found this review helpful