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  • The Age of Eisenhower

  • America and the World in the 1950s
  • By: William I. Hitchcock
  • Narrated by: Arthur Morey
  • Length: 25 hrs and 38 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 389
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 359
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 358

In a 2017 survey, presidential historians ranked Dwight D. Eisenhower fifth on the list of great presidents, behind the perennial top four: Lincoln, Washington, Franklin D. Roosevelt, and Teddy Roosevelt. Historian William Hitchcock shows that this high ranking is justified. Eisenhower's accomplishments were enormous and loom ever larger from the vantage point of our own tumultuous times.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Fantastic analysis of an often overlooked man

  • By Mark on 04-21-18

Meh

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-08-19

Lackluster writing and analysis. Reads like a dry, exhaustive, account of this happened, and then this happened... If you’re looking to be transported to the 50’s, flux capacitor this is not.

  • The Secret Knowledge

  • On the Dismantling of American Culture
  • By: David Mamet
  • Narrated by: Johnny Heller
  • Length: 6 hrs and 46 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 238
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 204
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 201

For the past 30 years, David Mamet has been a controversial and defining force in theater and film, championing the most cherished liberal values along the way. In some of the great movies and plays of our time, his characters have explored the ethics of the business world, embodied the struggles of the oppressed, and faced the flaws of the capitalist system. But in recent years Mamet has had a change of heart.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Mamet's Rubicon

  • By Kirk on 08-13-11

Though provoking self examination

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-21-19

Mamet one of the greatest living dramatist turns his attention to America’s abdication of foundation values in the post 60’s generation and calls for a return to the basic truths that created the most prosperous country in history and a bastion of reason and freedom. This book is not demagoguery but a soul searching quest to the roots of our self destruction in the name of “fairness” “social justice” and “equality of outcome”. It’s a practitioners analysis of the applied thought of Friedman & Hayek and a call to arms for those who seek justice.

  • The World Was Never the Same: Events That Changed History

  • By: J. Rufus Fears, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: J. Rufus Fears
  • Length: 18 hrs and 13 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 520
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 473
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 467

History is made and defined by landmark events-moments that irrevocably changed the course of human civilization. They have given us: spiritual and political ideas; catastrophic battles and wars; scientific and technological advances; world leaders both influential and monstrous; and cultural works of unparalleled beauty.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Fun course but Professor Fears is not for everyone

  • By Quaker on 11-04-13

Slow build up- strong finish

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-28-18

An excellent overview of many touchstones worth a reexamination- good for beginners or serious students of history. An important theme is the reoccurring cycle of debt and financial crises shaping societies through human history.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Kissinger: Volume I

  • 1923-1968: The Idealist
  • By: Niall Ferguson
  • Narrated by: Malcolm Hillgartner
  • Length: 34 hrs and 11 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 237
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 212
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 211

No American statesman has been as revered and as reviled as Henry Kissinger. Once hailed as "Super-K" - the "indispensable man" whose advice has been sought by every president from Kennedy to Obama - he has also been hounded by conspiracy theorists, scouring his every "telcon" for evidence of Machiavellian malfeasance. Yet as Niall Ferguson shows in this magisterial biography, the idea of Kissinger as the ruthless arch-realist is based on a profound misunderstanding.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Paradigm Shift Alert!

  • By LHM on 10-19-15

Better than isaacson and worth the time

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-07-17

This account is less narrative and more philosophical about the bildungsroman of kissinger, with ample historical context and dives deep into themes of realism, legalism, and a generation feeling its way through revolutionary change at the turn of every corner. Too deep for general interest but essential for the historically curious or would-be practitioner of statecraft

  • Autumn in the Heavenly Kingdom

  • China, the West, and the Epic Story of the Taiping Civil War
  • By: Stephen R. Platt
  • Narrated by: Angela Lin
  • Length: 17 hrs and 33 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 94
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 83
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 85

Stephen R. Platt is widely respected for his incisive nonfiction, particularly in regard to his knowledge and understanding of China. With Autumn in the Heavenly Kingdom, Platt details the absorbing narrative of the Taiping Rebellion, which resulted in the loss of 20 million lives. Occurring in the 1850s, this is the story of a cultural movement characterized by intriguing personages such as influential military strategist Zeng Guofan and brilliant Taiping leader Hong Rengan.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • InTOLerable Reader

  • By Adam on 07-07-12

Shocking epic retelling of bloodiest civil war in human history

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-02-16

18 hr retelling of taiping uprising and concurrent second opium war. Worth the time in its timeless lessons of statecraft, treachery, and neocolonial dim grey boundaries between duty, honor, and humanity of naive Western powers playing the great game in the midst of a foggy, faraway quagmire.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful