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JediBirther

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  • The X-15 Rocket Plane

  • Flying the First Wings into Space
  • By: Michelle L. Evans
  • Narrated by: Gary L. Willprecht
  • Length: 20 hrs and 43 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 163
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 149
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 149

With the Soviet Union's launch of the first Sputnik satellite in 1957, the Cold War soared to new heights as Americans feared losing the race into space. The X-15 Rocket Plane tells the enthralling yet little-known story of the hypersonic X-15, the winged rocket ship that met this challenge and opened the way into human-controlled spaceflight. Drawing on interviews with those who were there, Michelle Evans captures the drama and excitement of, yes, rocket science.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • A Facinating Topic But Mediocre Presentation

  • By Glenn on 01-06-16

Painfully Boring

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-30-17

I love aerospace technology and stories about it but cripes, this will put you to sleep. It's 67 biographies of the people who worked on the X-15 and reads like VCR repair manual read by your most boring Uncle. There is no big picture view of how this factored into the Cold War; No implications of the technology for research or aerial warfare; No info on what the Russians were doing in response. No, instead you get stories about the chief mechanic's upbringing in Nebraska. Its no surprise that author's only other work is about the Texas court system. (*Yawn*) I wanted to quit this half way through and only suffered it to write this review to warn others that this is the perfect substitution for sleeping pills.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Toyota Way

  • By: Jeffrey Liker
  • Narrated by: Grover Gardner
  • Length: 4 hrs and 36 mins
  • Abridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,212
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 849
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 851

In factories around the world, Toyota consistently makes the highest-quality cars with the fewest defects of any competing manufacturer, while using fewer man-hours, less on-hand inventory, and half the floor space of its competitors. The Toyota Way is the first book for a general audience that explains the management principles and business philosophy behind Toyota's worldwide reputation for quality and reliability.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Skips to Many Parts of the Book

  • By Staci on 02-08-12

A Bit Too Much Consultant Fluff

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-18-17

While there were a couple interesting sections of the book, it was too reverent and not at all analytical. You get the impression that Toyota management have made no errors in judgement throughout their 100 year history. They all read as grown up Eagle Scouts with zero defects. I'm sure this wows at corporate consultant seminars, but as a book it's got a bit too much consultant fluff. Thank the Lord this is an abridged version.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Story of the Volsungs

  • The Volsunga Saga
  • By: Anonymous
  • Narrated by: Antony Ferguson
  • Length: 4 hrs and 34 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 157
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 148
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 148

Originally written in Icelandic in the 13th century AD by an anonymous author, The Story of The Volsungs is a legendary saga based on Norse mythology. The epic describes the legendary history and heroic feats of several generations of mythic Viking families and derives from many sources, including preexisting Edda, or heroic poems, Norse legends, historical events, and orally transmitted folklore. The saga is imbued throughout with themes of power, jealousy, love, vengeance, and fear.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Passionate, Poetic, Bloody, Heroic, & Tragic Saga

  • By Jefferson on 03-28-12

Archaic Translation

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-29-16

This saga is presumably translated from 15th century Icelandic, yet it sounds like it's been translated into 15th century English. There are so many archaic words it makes the saga difficult comprehend. The narration is also choppy. The story of Atli (Attila) however is an interesting dip into Germanic folklore.

3 of 5 people found this review helpful