LISTENER

Wormie1138

Illinois
  • 2
  • reviews
  • 1
  • helpful vote
  • 3
  • ratings
  • The Dead House

  • By: Dawn Kurtagich
  • Narrated by: Charlotte Parry, Christian Coulson
  • Length: 10 hrs and 26 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 176
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 163
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 163

Over two decades have passed since the fire at Elmbridge High, an inferno that took the lives of five teenagers. Not much was known about the events leading up to the tragedy - only that one student, Carly Johnson, vanished without a trace....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Sucked in, spit out, sucked in...

  • By Daryl on 08-06-16

Audio is fantastic, the story not so much

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-04-18

The audio read for this novel really gets you into the story. I felt as if I were watching a movie as I listened to this novel. The readers use sound effects, music, and audio editing to make this a really exciting story. The readers (the female at least) really sells the story and puts in a great performance. Her accents were wonderful and I would love to listen to more books read by her.

I would have given the story itself more stars if it hadn't been filled with so many overused horror tropes. Psychotic protagonist might be just be possessed and not really crazy, weird (fictional) religious cults that mess with spirits, tampering with "dark arts," mystery surrounding the deaths, group of friends risking their life for one person, and the use of "found footage" is even in there. I could see the ending coming a mile away (though, to be honest, I have a bad habit of doing that) and it wasn't shocking. There was only one really shocking moment, and it more had to do with its grotesqueness than anything else. What the story does have going for it is the playing with the unreliable narrator. I much prefer unreliable narrator stories (Edgar Allan Poe is excellent for this), and it's a lot of fun trying to figure out what it really going on with Carly/Kaitlyn. I haven't had much time to think about it but I'm still churning my brain about what the real story is.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Cure for Dreaming

  • By: Cat Winters
  • Narrated by: Jennifer Ikeda
  • Length: 8 hrs and 56 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 54
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 52
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 52

Olivia Mead is a headstrong, independent girl - a suffragist - in an age that prefers its girls to be docile. It’s 1900 in Oregon, and Olivia’s father, concerned that she’s headed for trouble, convinces a stage mesmerist to try to hypnotize the rebellion out of her. But the hypnotist, an intriguing young man named Henri Reverie, gives her a terrible gift instead: She’s able to see people’s true natures, manifesting as visions of darkness and goodness, while also unable to speak her true thoughts out loud.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Ok

  • By Whovian on 06-30-17

Good Historical Fiction, audio could use some work

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-04-18

I'll start with my review of the audio itself. The reader needs to fix her microphone or get a new one. It became distracting when the audio would suddenly change volume and quality for a sentence, and then go back to normal. Maybe this is some kind of rendering issue, still an issue none the less. And while the skipping wasn't frequent, there were skips throughout the reading. The reader herself was wonderful, and she does some good accents, I was just distracted by the quality.

The story itself was good, and I could see myself using this with my students one day (I'm a teacher). I enjoyed the allusions to Dracula (the novel), as I am interested in the way Dracula reads from the feminists point of view. If you read this then I strong encourage reading Dracula as well. This is a good companion piece and almost acts as a response to that novel. The ending is not very shocking, though the climax of the novel is quite exciting. The author brings up many important issues about gender equality and the importance of having a voice.