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Jessica M. Henn

Rockvile, MD USA
  • 38
  • reviews
  • 22
  • helpful votes
  • 94
  • ratings
  • The Worldship Humility

  • By: R. R. Haywood
  • Narrated by: Colin Morgan
  • Length: 13 hrs and 58 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 652
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 621
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 618

It’s been 120 years since the 50 or so worldships containing the few million survivors of the human species set off after the planet Earth was destroyed by a meteor. On the Worldship Humility, Sam, a 30-year-old Airlock Operative, is bored. Living in space should be exciting and full of adventure, except it isn’t, and he fills his time hacking 3-D movie posters and holographic adverts outside the stores in the retail zone. Petty thief Yasmine Emile Dufont is also from the WS Humility, but she is not bored....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Stupendous narration

  • By Anonymous User on 02-01-19

Porridge, Dopplegangers, and Heists, Oh My!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-07-19

I got this because I loved Colin Morgan in Merlin, and he did NOT disappoint. Who knew he's so amazing at voices and accents? This book has tons of characters and they were all distinct and every voice felt spot on. It felt like a full cast performance all coming out of one man. He narrates using his natural Irish accent which is beautiful, though there were a few moments I was left scratching my head over whether a word was scifi lingo or just his accent ( ex: there was a moment where he is talking about "Earth ters" and it took me a minute to figure out it was actually "Earth TOURS")

On to the story. This is the first book in what I believe is meant to eventually be a trilogy, and you definitely get the sense that this is sort of setting up more to come. The plot described in the synopsis when you go to buy the book talks about how the Earth was destroyed and humanity is now spread out amongst several worldships searching for a new planet, yet some want to keep the fact that a new planet has finally been discovered a secret, so you go in expecting massive cover ups and political machinations. That is there, but while there are many characters involved in that plot line, the main characters remain blissfully ignorant of all that and instead divide their time between trying to run a porridge cafe, pulling off a heist, and avoiding gangsters. An odd combination, but it actually works. I enjoyed this book a lot and am looking forward to the next one and getting deeper into the political scheming plotline, but just be aware going in to this that you may be frustrated if you want a plot that is tightly focused on corrupt space politics.

Trigger warning! This book deals with issues of sexual violence at times. One of the main characters had been raped before the events of this book begin which influence her character a lot and she does have flash backs periodically (they dont go into too much detail in those scenes but it does happen). There are also several scenes where people try to grope or attempt to rape characters, but spoiler warning no one is actually raped during the course of the story.

  • Minimum Wage Magic

  • By: Rachel Aaron
  • Narrated by: Emily Woo Zeller
  • Length: 9 hrs and 45 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 866
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 803
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 804

The DFZ, the metropolis formerly known as Detroit, is the world’s most magical city with a population of nine million and zero public safety laws. That’s a lot of mages, cybernetically enhanced chrome heads, and mythical beasties who die, get into debt, and otherwise fail to pay their rent. When they can’t pay their bills, their stuff gets sold to the highest bidder. That’s when they call me. I’m a Cleaner: a freelance mage employed by the DFZ to sort through the mountains of magical junk people leave behind. It’s not a pretty job, or a safe one....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • too short

  • By Elisabeth K. on 01-12-19

Shut up and take my money

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-06-19

I was completely surprised when I logged into Audible one day to find a new book set in the Heartstrikers universe. Of course this was an instant buy and I'm quite pleased with my purchase.

Minimum Wage Magic takes place 20 years after the events in the Heartstrikers series and features entirely new characters. There really aren't any cameos in this, unless you count the DFZ or the Spirit of the Forgotten Dead. Opal makes her money clearing out abandoned properties and keeping anything of value she finds. This portion of the plot feels very much like storage wars, complete with jerks trying to bid each other up. After a multi-month bad luck streak, Opal finds herself in a bind and needs $10,000 by the end of the week to pay off a debt or face dire consequences. What she finds in an apartment she's clearing out ends up leading her and one of her rival Cleaners on a (hopefully) lucrative quest across the DFZ.

It felt so great to be back in the Heartstrikers universe, plus there were plenty of plot elements that reminded me of the early days where Julius and Marci had their animal control business. It looks like we can once again be expecting a slow, working class romance in the bowels of the DFZ. I can't wait for the next book.

  • Zero G

  • By: Dan Wells
  • Narrated by: Emily Woo Zeller, Margaret Ying Drake, Josh Hurley, and others
  • Length: 4 hrs and 8 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,169
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,403
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,363

Twelve-year-old Zero is traveling with 20,000 people for 105 years to colonize a new planet. Everyone is in stasis, so they'll be safe during the trip, but when Zero's pod malfunctions it wakes him early, like 105 years early. At first he's excited to be the only one awake - he has the entire ship to himself, so he can go anywhere and see and do and eat anything he wants - but when a family of space pirates show up, trying to hijack the ship and kidnap the colonizers, Zero has to think fast and find a way to stop them all on his own.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Passengers movie with space pirates

  • By Kingsley on 12-07-18

Pay attention to intended audience

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-07-18

I just got this through the monthly originals thing and am already wishing I'd paid more attention to the age range of intended readers. I saw the summary talking about waking up early during interstellar travel and fighting space pirates and thought that sounds like fun. I am an adult but I read YA books regularly so thought it would be fine even though it says straight up that it is geared for a younger audience. It would seem that intended audience was younger than I anticipated. I admit I only got through 1.5 chapters but during that time all there is are bickering children, spit balls, and an overly chipper admissions officer on the ship all too happy to spew expositional information at us. I'm sure it is a good read, but for like 9 year olds.
I will say the production value of that bit I listened to was really good. It had background space port type noises that gave you a feeling of being there without making the dialogue too difficult to hear. It is a multi-voiced production and the various voice actors were all doing a good job, though the main character's voice was kind of painfully high pitched in my opinion.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Muse of Nightmares

  • By: Laini Taylor
  • Narrated by: Steve West
  • Length: 15 hrs and 54 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 948
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 896
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 895

In the wake of tragedy, neither Lazlo nor Sarai are who they were before. One a god, the other a ghost, they struggle to grasp the new boundaries of their selves as dark-minded Minya holds them hostage, intent on vengeance against Weep. Lazlo faces an unthinkable choice - save the woman he loves, or everyone else? - while Sarai feels more helpless than ever. But is she? Sometimes, only the direst need can teach us our own depths, and Sarai, the muse of nightmares, has not yet discovered what she's capable of.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Just. Wow.

  • By Amazon Customer on 03-23-19

16 hours well spent

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-20-18

Strange the Dreamer left us on a horrible cliffhanger with our beloved characters facing what looked like insurmountable odds, so I was a little afraid of Muse of Nightmares. Fear not, this book is just as beautiful and exciting and emotional as the first and despite all the odds, Lazlo and Sarai aren't as trapped as they seemed where we left them in Strange the Dreamer. I'm still debating with myself if I liked this book equally as well as Strange the Dreamer, or if I like it more. It takes a long time for Sarai and Lazlo to meet in the first book, but at the start of Muse we already know the characters and we are already in exciting situations. I also loved seeing some of the more peripheral characters grow. There is another story being told alongside that of Sarai and Lazlo so don't be put off when the book doesn't immediately start exactly where we left off. This was a very satisfying read with multiple mysteries from the first book being explained, I don't think I can recommend this book enough.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Lady's Guide to Petticoats and Piracy

  • By: Mackenzi Lee
  • Narrated by: Moira Quirk
  • Length: 11 hrs and 16 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 544
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 520
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 516

A year after a grand tour with her brother, Felicity Montague has returned to England with two goals - avoid the marriage proposal of a lovestruck suitor and enroll in medical school. However, her intellect will never be enough in the eyes of the sexist administrators. But then a window of opportunity opens - a doctor she idolizes is marrying an old friend of hers in Germany. Felicity believes this man can help her, but she has no money of her own to make the trip. Luckily, a mysterious young woman is willing to pay Felicity’s way, so long as she’s allowed to travel with Felicity.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • very fun listen

  • By H. Kravitz on 10-25-18

Pirates and Dragons and Girl Power, oh my!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-11-18

I absolutely adored the Gentleman's Guide to Vice and Virtue and was ridiculously thrilled when I saw there was going to be a sequel from Felicity's POV. I was a bit apprehensive about narrator choices because Christian Coulson was such an amazing narrator for the Gentleman's Guide but obviously it wouldn't really work to have a male narrator for the Lady's Guide. I was quite pleased with the choice of Moira Quirk. I have liked her work on other books and she does a good job here.
It is hard to not compare this with the Gentleman's Guide, and it is also difficult to compare them. The writing style that I loved in the Gentleman's Guide is the same between the two, and once again we find ourselves on an adventure traveling all over 1700s Europe and North Africa. Yet what I like about the two are different. I adore Monty and Percy's relationship in the Gentleman's Guide, and their search for the panacea was fascinating to me. Felicity is less charismatic than Monty, and while I enjoyed the plot, I was more interested in the panacea quest than Felicity's quest to find dragons and scientific acclaim. That being said, I could relate to Felicity's struggles against sexism so much, and I really liked the female friendships. I like both books, I just got different things out of them.

For those of you like me who couldn't get enough Monty and Percy in the first book, fear not for they make cameo appearances, though they aren't there as much as I'd like. (But let's be real, if they were around as much as I wanted it would be another Monty book).
I had an aunt that would always give me books with strong female characters when I was growing up and the whole time I was reading this I couldn't help but think this would have been one of her selections and it made me want to pass it along in the same tradition.
#Gender #1700s #clever #Tagsgiving #Sweepstakes

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Moth and Spark

  • A Novel
  • By: Anne Leonard
  • Narrated by: Christian Coulson
  • Length: 14 hrs and 10 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 26
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 23
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 24

Prince Corin has been chosen to free the dragons from their bondage to the Empire, but dragons aren’t big on directions. They have given him some of their power, but none of their knowledge. No one, not the dragons nor their riders, is even sure what keeps the dragons in the Empire’s control. Tam, sensible daughter of a well-respected doctor, had no idea before she arrived in the capital that she is a Seer, gifted with visions. When the two run into each other (quite literally) in the library, sparks fly and Corin impulsively asks Tam to dinner. But it’s not all happily ever after.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Dragons and Princes and Seers, Oh My

  • By Jessica M. Henn on 10-29-18

Dragons and Princes and Seers, Oh My

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-29-18

This should properly be a 3.5 but that wasn't an option. I saw this was narrated by Christian Coulson who I loved in The Gentleman's Guide to Vice and Virtue and when that was coupled with dragons and romance, I was sold.
Still, I honestly struggled with the first 1.5 -2 hours. It isn't that nothing happens during this time, but it largely feels like it is being described to me instead of it happening. This author has a tendency to lean on flowery descriptions that kind of took away from the story for me. I also had a weird issue with names in this book. The author doesn't always introduce names clearly - is that a person or a place name? It would be helpful if people were occasionally referred to as "King so and so" or "Emperor whatsit" instead of just all being on a first name basis.
I see in other reviews people liked that beginning part best and then were put off once the main character reached court, but I had the opposite reaction. Christian Couldon shines most when he is doing dialogue and it felt like no one was talking and everything was description until we reached court.
Other reviewers seemed surprised by the romance part of the story and complain it has too much insta-love, but that romance aspect was part of the main draw for me to read the book. The description literally says they bump into each other at the library and he immediately asks her to dinner, so a little insta-love wasn't that unexpected to me. Really it took too long for them to meet, so then insta-love was necessary to make the timing of the rest of the book work.
Over all I enjoyed this book, but I was seriously considering returning it during that beginning part and was just hoping the plot, which looked promising, would pick up and make up for the flowery language. I do think this book could have benefited from more editing out descriptions and some pointless parts. There was also apparently a whole plot point I somehow missed and I'm still debating if I fell asleep while reading that part and that's why I was confused or if the writing was just weird.
In the end, I would probably have been happy to borrow this from the library and save my credit, but my library doesn't have this book in audio format, so c'est la vie.

  • Wraith

  • By: Helen Harper
  • Narrated by: Ruth Urquhart
  • Length: 9 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,181
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,099
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,097

Saiya Buchanan is a wraith, able to detach her shadow from her body and send it off to do her bidding. But, unlike most of her kin, Saiya doesn't deal in death. Instead, she trades secrets - and in the goblin besieged city of Stirling in Scotland, they're a highly prized commodity. It might just be, however, that the goblins have been hiding the greatest secret of them all. When Gabriel de Florinville, a Dark Elf, is sent as royal envoy into Stirling and takes her prisoner, Saiya is not only going to uncover the sinister truth.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great book and superb narration!

  • By AshleyH on 04-21-18

Great accents

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-23-18

I enjoyed this read, though it's not without its flaws. The narration is great - it is set in Stirling, Scotland and the narrator has a Scottish accent throughout, plus all the characters sound different so you don't get confused. Different characters even seem to pronounce the certain words differently than others, which gave them interesting and unique voices. I felt like the Scottish accents were clearly Scottish while also easy to understand. I loved how the word "food" was pronounced "fud," for example.

The names of the rival goblin factions kept throwing me, since one of the groups seems to be called the Nice goblins, though they aren't any nicer than the Fillet goblins. Maybe written out they are spelled differently, but Nice and Fillet are what they sounded like the narrator was saying, anyways, which just always felt weird.

The prologue is from the Male lead's perspective and then switches to the female lead and never switches back, which was also a little weird. I would have really liked to see his POV every now and then.

I also felt their relationship was a bit insta-love and then under-developed. I liked how the female lead was clearly a strong independent woman, but I would have liked more time with the two actually getting to know each other and such.

That being said, I was entertained throughout. This is a fun quick read and an enjoyable listening experience.

  • Regicide

  • The Completionist Chronicles Series, Book 2
  • By: Dakota Krout
  • Narrated by: Vikas Adam
  • Length: 13 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 4,713
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 4,441
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 4,436

 Dakota Krout presents the second book in The Completionist Chronicles series. 

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • King of litRPG

  • By Max on 09-20-18

Un-bear-ably Punny :)

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-19-18

You definitely have to enjoy puns - or at least be able to grin and bear through them. There were so many bear related puns in this book. We see the continuation of Joe's journey living in a video game. I greatly enjoyed this book. Quests only alluded to in the first book were followed up on in this one and new quests have been set up for the next book. Joe finally gets to start specializing in this book which is great fun, not to mention we get to see the quest "Shatter a People" play out in an epic war against the wolfmen. A worthy sequel and I'm now eagerly awaiting the next book.

  • Cronin's Key

  • Cronin's Key Series, Book 1
  • By: N.R. Walker
  • Narrated by: Joel Leslie
  • Length: 10 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 992
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 939
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 939

NYPD Detective Alec MacAidan has always been good with weird. After all, his life has been a string of the unexplainable. But when an injured man gives him cryptic clues, then turns to dust in front of him, Alec's view on weird is changed forever. Cronin, a vampire Elder, has spent the last 1,000 years waiting for Alec. He'd been told his fated one would be a man wielding a shield, but he didn't expect him to be human, and he certainly didn't expect that shield to be a police badge.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Adventure - Porn?

  • By Amazon Customer on 11-28-17

just breathe

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-08-18

The story was fine, though honestly whenever they would try to make connections through history, like with pyramids and mummies to vampires, I would just kind of cringe and laugh. My main issue though was the narrator. That man sounds like he is running out of breath at the end of every sentence and I just wanted him to breathe. He was very good at accents, though, so if you are ok with kind of wavery voice then that makes up for things.

  • A Dragon of a Different Color

  • Heartstrikers, Book 4
  • By: Rachel Aaron
  • Narrated by: Vikas Adam
  • Length: 21 hrs and 25 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,819
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,664
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,655

To save his family from his tyrannical mother, Julius had to step on a lot of tails. That doesn't win a nice dragon many friends, but just when he thinks he's starting to make progress, a new threat arrives. Turns out, things can get worse. Heartstriker hasn't begun to pay for its secrets, and the dragons of China are here to collect. When the Golden Emperor demands his surrender, Julius will have to choose between loyalty to the sister who's always watched over him and preserving the clan he gave everything to protect.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • interesting--but...

  • By MVF on 01-28-18

bogged down in magical theory

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-03-18

There were actually a lot of plot points that have been hinted at for a long time finally coming together in this book, which was awesome. Unfortunately, the book also gets bogged down with people discussing magical theory at great length. I'm talking hours worth of standing around discussing the nature of Merlins, the Sea of Magic, Mortal Spirits, ...it just goes on. I like to understand how things work within a book, but it was just too much. Also Julius and Marci are separated for the majority of the book, which was frustrating. I think they finally meet up in hour 18 out of 21 or something crazy like that. This resulted in the Julius chapters being filled with plot points we've been wanting to learn about for a while finally kicking in - we finally find out of what happened in China, etc., and then you would switch to Marci and be back to discussing magic and rarely using it. I still enjoyed this book and it is a great series, but I do feel like more editing was needed to cut down on the excessive magical theorizing in this one.