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Allyson

  • 20
  • reviews
  • 7
  • helpful votes
  • 23
  • ratings
  • Daniel Deronda

  • By: George Eliot
  • Narrated by: Juliet Stevenson
  • Length: 36 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 246
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 231
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 230

Meeting by chance at a gambling hall in Europe, the separate lives of Daniel Deronda and Gwendolen Harleth are immediately intertwined. Daniel, an Englishman of uncertain parentage, becomes Gwendolyn's redeemer as she finds herself drawn to his spiritual and altruistic nature after a loveless marriage. But Daniel's path was already set when he rescued a young Jewess from suicide.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Give it a try!

  • By Tucker LaPrade on 01-30-16

Juliet Does it Again

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-22-19

I'm a fan in general of many of the classics from this era, and especially -don't tell Georges Elliot - Jane Austen stories, but this one is is interesting in its treatment of racial prejudice. I find Elliott's ramblings in philosophy get a bit long she does take herself a bit seriously it seems but the story is engrossing and has some good insights. Juliet Stevenson reads with her usual mastery and it's worth listening to Jessica.

  • Man and Superman

  • By: George Bernard Shaw
  • Narrated by: Judi Dench, Ralph Fiennes, Juliet Stevenson, and others
  • Length: 4 hrs and 16 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 58
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 52
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 51

Man and Superman was the first drama to be broadcast on the BBC's Third Programme on October 1, 1946. To celebrate Radio 3's 50th anniversary, the play was directed by Sir Peter Hall, and preserved for all time in this lush audio dramatization. 'A comedy and a philosophy', Man and Superman is based on the Don Juan theme, and using all the elements from Mozart's Don Giovanni, Shaw reordered them so that Don Juan becomes the quarry instead of the huntsman.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • An Entertaining Philisopical Farce

  • By Allyson on 04-06-19

An Entertaining Philisopical Farce

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-06-19

this play gives away entirely too many secrets and does so with wit and amazing timing

  • The History of the Ancient World

  • From the Earliest Accounts to the Fall of Rome
  • By: Susan Wise Bauer
  • Narrated by: John Lee
  • Length: 26 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 3,102
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,782
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,765

This is the first volume in a bold new series that tells the stories of all peoples, connecting historical events from Europe to the Middle East to the far coast of China, while still giving weight to the characteristics of each country. Susan Wise Bauer provides both sweeping scope and vivid attention to the individual lives that give flesh to abstract assertions about human history. This narrative history employs the methods of "history from beneath" - literature, epic traditions, private letters, and accounts - to connect kings and leaders with the lives of those they ruled.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Fast paced history

  • By serine on 01-23-16

Masterfully Told

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-04-19

Be prepared for over 26 hours of storytelling that switches back and forth from the Mediterranean to Asia, ending up intertwining then both. Beautifully read and fairly objectively told.

  • Our Mutual Friend

  • By: Charles Dickens
  • Narrated by: Stacy Newman
  • Length: 35 hrs and 42 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 25
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 22
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 22

A satiric masterpiece about the allure and peril of money, "Our Mutual Friend" revolves around the inheritance of a dust-heap where the rich throw their trash. When the body of John Harmon, the dust-heap's expected heir, is found in the Thames, fortunes change hands surprisingly, raising to new heights "Noddy" Boffin, a low-born but kindly clerk who becomes "the Golden Dustman." Charles Dickens's last complete novel, "Our Mutual Friend" encompasses the great themes of his earlier works: the pretensions of the nouveaux riches, the ingenuousness of the aspiring poor, and the unfailing power of wealth to corrupt all who crave it.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Dickens meets Agatha Christie

  • By T. Malloy on 03-25-19

Thought-provoking if Drawn Out

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-14-18

I was unaware of this story before finding it here in Audible. As it was written in over 70 installments, it is about 68 chapters! They are entertaining enough and satisfying enough with Dickens' usual revelations of social injustice of the antebellum era. He is as preachy and sarcastic as I have ever experienced which makes me wonder what got on his last nerve, leading to its creation.

  • The Ocean at the End of the Lane

  • A Novel
  • By: Neil Gaiman
  • Narrated by: Neil Gaiman
  • Length: 5 hrs and 48 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 17,889
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16,579
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16,556

A middle-aged man returns to his childhood home to attend a funeral. He is drawn to the farm at the end of the road, where, when he was seven, he encountered a most remarkable girl, Lettie Hempstock. Forty years earlier, a man committed suicide in a stolen car at this farm at the end of the road. Like a fuse on a firework, his death lit a touchpaper. The darkness was unleashed, something scary and thoroughly incomprehensible to a little boy. And Lettie - magical, comforting, wise beyond her years - promised to protect him, no matter what.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Gaiman delivers an intimate masterpiece

  • By Talia on 08-07-13

Pay Attention

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-19-18

I can't count how many nights I have lost sleep because I stayed up late to listen to this book being beautifully read by the author. Now, I will have to go back and listen to the beginning again because there's so much more to the ending than I understood the first time through.

  • A Room with a View

  • By: E. M. Forster
  • Narrated by: Claire Walsh
  • Length: 7 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 42
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 38
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 37

One of E. M. Forster's most celebrated novels, "A Room With a View" is the story of a young English middle-class girl, Lucy Honeychurch. While vacationing in Italy, Lucy meets and is wooed by two gentlemen, George Emerson and Cecil Vyse. After turning down Cecil Vyse's marriage proposals twice Lucy finally accepts. Upon hearing of the engagement George protests and confesses his true love for Lucy. Lucy is torn between the choice of marrying Cecil, who is a more socially acceptable mate, and George who she knows will bring her true happiness. "A Room With a View" is a tale of classic human struggles such as the choice between social acceptance or true love.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Just OK

  • By Allyson on 10-14-18

Just OK

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-14-18

This well-known story was entertaining enough as a reading. The performer, however, was not quite well read enough to be able to pronounce several of the words correctly even from the British point of view. Having seen the movie, I was in hopes that the book would be of more substance. To a point, it was, but still had not enough substance to make a lasting impression.

  • Cider with Rosie

  • By: Laurie Lee
  • Narrated by: Laurie Lee
  • Length: 7 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 53
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 47
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 48

Cider with Rosie is a wonderfully vivid memoir of childhood in a remote Cotswold village, a village before electricity or cars, a timeless place on the verge of change. Growing up amongst the fields and woods and characters of the place, Laurie Lee depicts a world that is both immediate and real and belongs to a now-distant past.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A voice of the past

  • By Marianne on 08-23-14

It Grows on You

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-15-18

This memoir of a turn-of-the-century Welshman written and performed by the same person at an advanced age is rhythmically and melodiously performed but leaves one somewhat disatisfied. It's a first person glimpse into life in a poor family in the beginning of the 1900s through probably the beginning of World War II. For that reason it's edifying, but somewhat disturbing in it's frankness about sexuality of a young and growing male. This reader happens to be disappointed at the interjection of what sometimes seems unnecessarily gratuitous sexuality into everything nowadays. The character development was insightful, anyway.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • A Tale of Two Cities [Recorded Books]

  • By: Charles Dickens
  • Narrated by: Frank Muller
  • Length: 13 hrs and 57 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,373
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 824
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 814

"It was the best of times, it was the worst of times..." So begins this classic, one of the most beloved novels of all time. Charles Dickens brings the French Revolution to life through such vivid characters as Charles Darnay, the Old Doctor, Sydney Carton and Lucy Manette. The action peaks with the storming of the Bastille, the dreaded symbol of government authority. And the blade of La Guillotine falls again...

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Absolute literature...and a page turner at that!

  • By Amazon Customer on 07-30-03

No Presumption

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-28-18

It would be a presumption for me to pass any judgment on this timeless classic. I will only focus on the performance in reading it. I have listened to many Audible books but this one has been done with such an amazing ability to switch among characters in such a seamless and convincing manner that I feel privileged to have heard it.

  • A Gentleman in Moscow

  • A Novel
  • By: Amor Towles
  • Narrated by: Nicholas Guy Smith
  • Length: 17 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 23,735
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 22,000
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 21,920

A Gentleman in Moscow immerses us in an elegantly drawn era with the story of Count Alexander Rostov. When, in 1922, he is deemed an unrepentant aristocrat by a Bolshevik tribunal, the count is sentenced to house arrest in the Metropol, a grand hotel across the street from the Kremlin. Rostov, an indomitable man of erudition and wit, has never worked a day in his life and must now live in an attic room while some of the most tumultuous decades in Russian history are unfolding outside the hotel's doors.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Reprieve Amidst Ugly News, Relentless Negativity

  • By Cathy Lindhorst on 08-27-17

Truly a Work of Art

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-22-18

Courage, ingenuity and generosity are deftly woven into a gently-treated philosophical journey through eventful decades of Russian history. I count this as one of the greatest books I have ever read.

  • The Storied Life of A. J. Fikry

  • By: Gabrielle Zevin
  • Narrated by: Scott Brick
  • Length: 7 hrs and 2 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,961
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,250
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,249

The irascible A. J. Fikry, owner of Island Books - the only bookstore on Alice Island - has already lost his wife. Now his most prized possession, a rare book, has been stolen from right under his nose in the most embarrassing of circumstances. The store itself, it seems, will be next to go. One night upon closing, he discovers a toddler in his children’s section with a note from her mother pinned to her Elmo doll: I want Maya to grow up in a place with books and among people who care about such kinds of things. I love her very much, but I can no longer take care of her.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • A Tale for Booksellers

  • By B. Leon on 04-15-14

Sigh

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-02-18

This is a book whose unexpected twists keep you reading, even if the effete way in which it is read is a bit off-putting. The performer does manage to switch very effectively into female voice without raising the timbre of his voice or affecting stereotypical feminine tricks. Quite a feat. I love books, but do not share the religious fervor of this decidedly sectarian and therefore somewhat one-dimensional views espoused herein.