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  • Kokoro

  • By: Natsume Soseki
  • Narrated by: Matt Shea
  • Length: 7 hrs and 8 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 165
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 153
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 153

The subject of Kokoro, which can be translated as 'the heart of things' or as 'feeling,' is the delicate matter of the contrast between the meanings the various parties of a relationship attach to it. In the course of this exploration, Soseki brilliantly describes different levels of friendship, family relationships, and the devices by which men attempt to escape from their fundamental loneliness. The novel sustains throughout its length something approaching poetry, and it is rich in understanding and insight.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The Heart Of Things, Relationships & Feelings

  • By Sara on 04-27-15

I wanted to stop reading but i'm glad i kept going

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-11-18


the beginning chapters of this book were somewhat hard to go through, they were dull and it sounded like they were just a bunch of mostly unrelated scenes, and unimportant internal dialogues, I could hardly stop myself from wanting to refund this book, this book however gave me insite to the old Japanese frame of mind, to me (a modren person) it sounded weird how the main character had this sort of attachment to his Sensi, an older male teacher and i couldn't grasp why someone would need a relationship of this sort, this book was published in 1909 where sexism against women were not something to look down upon thus there were a few lines that were quite sexist which I wasn't fond of, but i guess it's good in the sense that it shows you how cultures evolved to respect women more nowdays, despite the urge to refund this book, i kept listening and gradually grew more familiar and attached to the characters, as the story progresses I start to understand why this book was called Kokoro or "heart", the book continues as sort of confessions to what Sensi hid from his student, the plot ttwoards the end becomes intresting, i'm glad i decided to continue reading but I wouldn't recommend it to people who get bored easily.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck

  • A Counterintuitive Approach to Living a Good Life
  • By: Mark Manson
  • Narrated by: Roger Wayne
  • Length: 5 hrs and 17 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 112,375
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 98,557
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 98,012

For decades we've been told that positive thinking is the key to a happy, rich life. "F*ck positivity," Mark Manson says. "Let's be honest, shit is f*cked, and we have to live with it." In his wildly popular Internet blog, Manson doesn't sugarcoat or equivocate. He tells it like it is - a dose of raw, refreshing, honest truth that is sorely lacking today. The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck is his antidote to the coddling, let's-all-feel-good mind-set that has infected modern society and spoiled a generation, rewarding them with gold medals just for showing up.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • A book for 20-somethings, but not me

  • By Bonny on 09-22-16

Good read but with a lot of common sense.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-28-18

It's a book filled with common sense, yet it is important to open our eyes again to it as we tend to forget thoes simple things while being so immersed in our daily lives, you probably already know most of this stuff but you never really sat and thought about it.

here some of the main points I took from this book:

- If you say you care about everything then you secretly say you care about nothing, limit the fucks you give about the shitty things life throws at you.

- This book pushes you to get out of the victim mentality and start taking responsibility of EVERYTHING that happens in your own life, stop expecting someone to magically appear and fix it for you.

- The writer emphasizes the idea that rejection is an important part of life, especially for the growth of a healthy relationship, you shouldn't accept everything other people do or say, you should stick to your own values.

- he encourages you to frequently remind yourself that we're all going to die to help diffrenciate what you should care and not care about.

- if you have opposing ideas about your loved ones choices in life, listen to them then tell them your opinions but don't impose it, if they chose to not take your advice respect them for that, if what they had chosen turned out to be a failiure just like you expected, don't bash them for it، open your arms to them because you love them.

- life is painful there is no way around thay but when u work a muscle it grows.

- if you don't know where to start from, then just do something. (anything) that u think will get u closer to it.

I wasn't quite fond of the profanity in the writer's style, ( I know I sound like a grandma) but I kind of hoped for it to be a little more formal, but I guess the writer wanted to sound like a friend, or he wanted to be closer to this generation.

15 of 17 people found this review helpful

  • No Longer Human

  • By: Osamu Dazai
  • Narrated by: David Shih
  • Length: 4 hrs and 13 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 155
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 147
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 147

Portraying himself as a failure, the protagonist of Osamu Dazai's No Longer Human narrates a seemingly normal life, even while he feels himself incapable of understanding human beings. Oba Yozo's attempts to reconcile himself to the world around him begin in early childhood, continue through high school, where he becomes a "clown" to mask his alienation, and eventually lead to a failed suicide attempt as an adult. Without sentimentality, he records the casual cruelties of life and its fleeting moments of human connection and tenderness.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Reassuring in its bare-boned humanity

  • By Michael - Audible Editor on 07-19-17

I keep relistening to it over and over again

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-20-18

although this book was relatively a small book of 177p, it took me several days to look through it, not because it was not good but quite the contrary, this book captivated me to my core, how the writer explicitly displayed his emotions, how sometimes brutal and utterly honest he was, it was something quite unique in this world where everyone tries extra hard to be "nice", he was.. real, to himself and to the world around him, to me he was the abseloute human, a truthful one.