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Jimmy Risk

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  • 12 Rules for Life

  • An Antidote to Chaos
  • By: Jordan B. Peterson, Norman Doidge MD - foreword
  • Narrated by: Jordan B. Peterson
  • Length: 15 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 40,712
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 36,706
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 36,387

What does everyone in the modern world need to know? Renowned psychologist Jordan B. Peterson's answer to this most difficult of questions uniquely combines the hard-won truths of ancient tradition with the stunning revelations of cutting-edge scientific research. Humorous, surprising, and informative, Dr. Peterson tells us why skateboarding boys and girls must be left alone, what terrible fate awaits those who criticize too easily, and why you should always pet a cat when you meet one on the street.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Life changing.

  • By Elijah Semeryuk on 12-11-18

Everyone should read this book and interpret it objectively

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-04-18

The author provides fundamental ideas of living that have been applicable throughout humankind and still are in today’s society.

I recommend everyone that reads this to step back, try to view these ideas from a neutral lens, and absorb the ideas objectively. You don’t need to agree with everything he says, but you should NOT use personal biases to disagree with ideas.

For example, he often utilizes biblical stories to convey ideas of ethics, morality, and how to generally live life. Those who are nonreligous (like myself) should NOT push these ideas away because they aren’t Christian. His idea is to provide concise examples that boil down fundamental ways of living, not to brainwash anyone into Christianity. Whether a story comes from your parents, The Simpsons, a children’s book, or the Bible, as long as it’s essence is there, you should recognize that and not attach personal disagreements with the context of it.

  • Head Strong

  • The Bulletproof Plan to Activate Untapped Brain Energy to Work Smarter and Think Faster - in Just Two Weeks
  • By: Dave Asprey
  • Narrated by: Dave Asprey, Rob Shapiro
  • Length: 10 hrs and 41 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,191
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,945
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,930

For the last decade, Silicon Valley entrepreneur Dave Asprey has worked with world-renowned doctors and scientists to uncover the latest, most innovative methods for making humans perform better - a process known as "biohacking". In his first book, The Bulletproof Diet, he shared his biohacking tips for taking control of your own biology. Now, in Head Strong, Asprey shows listeners how to biohack their way to sharper, smarter, faster, more resilient brains.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • I feel like I paid for an infomercial

  • By Jenna on 02-14-18

Take with a grain of salt

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-04-18

This book is a mismatch of personal experiences from the author combined with some science, rarely providing credible sources. While a lot of what he says can be verified scientifically, a lot of it is souped up with persuasive positive language to make the reader believe it is true.

For example, the author gives a long and detailed excursion into “Exclusion Zone Water,” saying we should eat cucumbers to increase the amount of it in our body. Google scholar searches yield extremely little peer-reviewed information about this subject, and general searches suggest that it may not even exist, and the initial articles about it are in low-impact journals.

It is frustrating to read this, because the author is intelligent and has a lot of useful information, but he mixes it so much with his own biases and advertises his own products that it makes it hard to decipher what is actually true, what he is trying to sell, and what is something that applies only to him because of his genetic makeup and isn’t applicable to the general population. It seems like the author is either unaware of what the placebo effect truly is, or is using it to take advantage of the readers.

18 of 18 people found this review helpful