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Mary Zaragoza

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  • 4
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  • How to Be a Friend to a Friend Who’s Sick

  • By: Letty Cottin Pogrebin
  • Narrated by: Pam Ward
  • Length: 9 hrs and 26 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 9
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9

Throughout her recent bout with breast cancer, Letty Cottin Pogrebin became fascinated by her friends’ and family’s diverse reactions to her and her illness: how awkwardly some of them behaved, how some misspoke or misinterpreted her needs, and how wonderful it was when people read her right. She began talking to her fellow patients and dozens of other veterans of serious illness, seeking to discover what sick people wished their friends knew about how best to comfort, help, and even simply talk to them.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Must Read

  • By Linda on 02-08-17

very helpful

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-18-16

The book was very insightful and helpful with stories that apply to a variety of situations.

  • The Five Love Languages of Children

  • By: Gary Chapman
  • Narrated by: Chris Fabry
  • Length: 5 hrs and 56 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 962
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 779
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 769

Two Christian parenting educators describe five ways we can connect with our children: physical touch, quality time, words of affirmation, gifts, and acts of service. These initiatives, when geared to the preferences of each child, make them feel loved and, thus, more receptive to guidance and redirection when needed. The authors are inspiring writers whose examples and quotes from children and parents are instructive.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Principles Every Parent Should Understand

  • By Niel on 07-11-12

very helpful .

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-05-15

helpful as it explains more than the 5 languages. I especially liked the part about managing anger to avoid passive aggressive behavior, in me and the child.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful