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Erin

  • 7
  • reviews
  • 6
  • helpful votes
  • 8
  • ratings
  • Heroine

  • By: Mindy McGinnis
  • Narrated by: Brittany Pressley
  • Length: 8 hrs and 33 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 54
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 53
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 53

When a car crash sidelines Mickey just before softball season, she has to find a way to hold on to her spot as the catcher for a team expected to make a historic tournament run. Behind the plate is the only place she’s ever felt comfortable, and the painkillers she’s been prescribed can help her get there. The pills do more than take away pain; they make her feel good. But as the pressure to be Mickey Catalan heightens, her need increases, and it becomes less about pain and more about want, something that could send her spiraling out of control. 

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Intense and Unapologetic

  • By Erin on 03-13-19

Intense and Unapologetic

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-13-19

Even before you get to the chilling first line (“When I wake up, all my friends are dead”) you know that this is the sort of story where everything is eventually going to fall apart, and you’ve come to watch the train wreck and hope that something can be saved at the end, and you can’t be entirely sure that it will be.

I listened to this book in a single day, after seeing the prologue and first three chapters in a preview shared on Twitter last week. The first-person voice is made all the more powerful by the narration which pulls you in and adds depth you don’t get from a page.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Heir of Fire

  • Throne of Glass, Book 3
  • By: Sarah J. Maas
  • Narrated by: Elizabeth Evans
  • Length: 20 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,800
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,224
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,225

Celaena has survived deadly contests and shattering heartbreak - but at an unspeakable cost. Now, she must travel to a new land to confront her darkest truth - a truth about her heritage that could change her life - and her future - forever. Meanwhile, brutal and monstrous forces are gathering on the horizon, intent on enslaving her world. Will Celaena find the strength to not only fight her inner demons, but to take on the evil that is about to be unleashed?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Shocked

  • By Adam Goudreault on 08-29-16

Why was this book even here?

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-21-18

I thoroughly enjoyed the first two books, and then I got to Heir of Fire. It is such a slog. I was worried I would blow through the first five books before I had new credits available to get new installments in the series. That was not a concern as I was dragging my feet every time I came back to this story like a cat who knows a bath is imminent.

I did not care about anyone or anything happening in this book until maybe the last 5 chapters. Everyone was moping or brooding.

I understand Celaena was mourning and that you have to show a character recovering from a traumatic experience, I just hate being there for that part of the story. She also has some weird platonic bonding with her broody mentor in a series of training scenes which I also hate reading/listening to. And then she pulled herself up, and started getting stuff done again right at the end.

I understand Chaol was coming to terms with his actions and the wedge they drove between him and those close to him, but I did not care.

I understand Dorian was making the best of his situation, and he even found some puppy love with someone who was far below his station, but I did not care, and the would-be punch in the gut at the end fell flat because I was not invested.

I understand SOMETHING REALLY IMPORTANT IS HAPPENING WITH WYVERNS, but the witch point of view we see everything through... makes me not care. And I care even less about her witch politics and relationship with her abusive grandma.

Points of view from minor characters were suddenly added without warning or transition. This is something the narrator is terrible about, by the way, she can do accents well, but is awful about assigning distinctive voices to characters and that has bothered me since Throne of Glass. There are so many POVs that can switch mid-chapter and I sometimes get lost for a few paragraphs.

I am on to Queen of Shadows now and back to the tightly paced, action driven narrative that the first two books had (even if Chaol is still being a little whiny). I am really hoping this was a one-off experience.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Updraft

  • Bone Universe, Book 1
  • By: Fran Wilde
  • Narrated by: Khristine Hvam
  • Length: 12 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 642
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 589
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 589

Welcome to a world of wind and bone, songs and silence, betrayal and courage. Kirit Densira cannot wait to pass her wingtest and begin flying as a trader by her mother's side, being in service to her beloved home tower and exploring the skies beyond. When Kirit inadvertently breaks Tower Law, the city's secretive governing body, the Singers, demand that she become one of them instead. In an attempt to save her family from greater censure, Kirit must give up her dreams to throw herself into the dangerous training at the Spire.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Wait for it

  • By G. Parish on 06-06-16

Started off well and then lost steam

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-10-18

The narrator was okay, she did a decent job bringing the first person POV to life. The world with towers of bone where the citizens of the city fly on silken wings was an interesting prospect, but I quickly tired of the protagonist. I don’t think I’ll be continuing the series.

  • Columbus Day

  • Expeditionary Force, Book 1
  • By: Craig Alanson
  • Narrated by: R.C. Bray
  • Length: 16 hrs and 23 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 31,140
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 29,603
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 29,528

The Ruhar hit us on Columbus Day. There we were, innocently drifting along the cosmos on our little blue marble, like the Native Americans in 1492. Over the horizon came ships of a technologically advanced, aggressive culture, and BAM! There went the good old days, when humans got killed only by each other. So, Columbus Day. It fits. When the morning sky twinkled again, this time with Kristang starships jumping in to hammer the Ruhar, we thought we were saved.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Sci Fi I didn't know I wanted

  • By Gary Glenn on 06-27-17

Good book, weak series

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-14-17

So, I got this book because I was browsing through audible before my morning shower to get something new before my commute to work. It's a fun premise, first contact is made, humans get all gung-ho about defending our planet and "allies" and go off into the universe.

Then it takes a turn when the main character picks up a chrome plated talking beer can who is the biggest asshole in the galaxy. Still fun, it's a snarky AI who is trying to find his way home and recruits these humans, a paisley paramecium wears an eye patch, good times.

I stopped after the second book and returned it because the series got formulaic, and it felt like the author was dragging out conversations with dumb human asking questions to the super smart AI to info dump, and it took the tried and true method of space expedition sci fi where it leapfrogs from one emergency to another, but wasn't executed well. Don't have a problem? Find one. Don't have a solution? Pull one out of your ass. Oh wait, plan A won't work, because x, y, and z happened while you weren't looking. Rinse and repeat 3-4 times, then have someone run out of resources.... then start all over again. I enjoyed book 1, will not continue.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Snapshot

  • By: Brandon Sanderson
  • Narrated by: William DeMeritt
  • Length: 2 hrs and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,874
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,688
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,688

From New York Times number-one best-selling author Brandon Sanderson comes a detective thriller in a police beat like no other. Anthony Davis and his partner, Chaz, are the only real people in a city of 20 million, sent there by court order to find out what happened in the real world 10 days ago so that hidden evidence can be brought to light and located in the real city today. Within the re-created Snapshot of May 1, Davis and Chaz are the ultimate authorities.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Creative World and Fantastic Mystery Story

  • By Sophia Rose on 02-18-17

Fantastic short listen

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-12-17

When I find a Sanderson title I don't have yet, I have no choice but to pick it up.

Snapshot is a great little story about what could happen if you had all the data to recreate a day, and send people from the real world in to observe it, particularly when those people are all too human.

  • Ten Thousand Skies Above You

  • Firebird
  • By: Claudia Gray
  • Narrated by: Tavia Gilbert
  • Length: 10 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 267
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 250
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 249

Marguerite Caine has done the impossible, traveling to alternate dimensions with the Firebird - the brilliant invention of her parents; her boyfriend, Paul; and their friend, Theo. But she has also caught the attention of enemies willing to kidnap, blackmail, and even kill to use the Firebird for themselves. When Paul's soul is splintered into four pieces - pieces that are trapped within Pauls in other dimensions - Marguerite will do anything and travel anywhere to save him.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Love this series and love Tavia Gilbert

  • By Nikarts77 on 05-10-16

Decent story, terrible narrator

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-18-16

I thoroughly enjoy Claudia Gray's style, ever since I started with the Evernight series. This installment of the Firebird trilogy feels like a penultimate novel, much the same way Brent Week's Blood Mirror and Sanderson's Well of Ascension do. Stakes are raised/antes are upped but it doesn't seem like anything earth shattering will happen.

Which is why I'm returning it half-listened to finish it on kindle where I can read in the voice in my head and no longer be punished by the tinny timber and breathy, shaky, whiny quality of this narrator when she tries to infuse intensity into a scene. Marguerite goes through a lot of scary stuff which might be forgiven, but this ridiculous tone carries over to her reading of the prose (perhaps because of the first-person POV of Marguerite) as well as her dramatization of Theo and Paul.

  • Dangerous Women

  • By: George R. R. Martin, Gardner Dozois
  • Narrated by: Scott Brick, Jonathan Frakes, Janis Ian, and others
  • Length: 32 hrs and 47 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,271
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1,169
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,172

All new and original to this volume, the 21 stories in Dangerous Women include work by 12 New York Times best sellers, and seven stories set in the authors’ best-selling continuities - including a new "Outlander" story by Diana Gabaldon, a tale of Harry Dresden’s world by Jim Butcher, a story from Lev Grossman set in the world of The Magicians, and a 35,000-word novella by George R. R. Martin about the Dance of the Dragons, the vast civil war that tore Westeros apart nearly two centuries before the events of A Game of Thrones.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Loved every minute of it

  • By carmen on 07-04-14

Do these people know what "Dangerous" means?

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-29-14

Would you try another book from George R. R. Martin and Gardner Dozois and/or the narrators?

Only if they fix their criteria. George R.R. Martin and Gardner Dozois created an anthology in which the stories are completely incongruous with the name. More than 50% of the stories in this anthology feature women who are victims, bystanders, or objects. When I think of a "dangerous woman" I think of Catelyn Tully, Cersei Lannister, and Arya Stark. I do not think of the woman in Joe R. Lansdale's "Wrestling Jesus" who doesn't even appear until 70% of the way through the book, and she is a trophy two retired wrestlers are fighting to obtain. In "I know how to pick 'em" a woman implies she wants a man to kill her husband. Dangerous? Possibly, but the story focuses on the man, his emotional scars from an incestuous relationship with his mother, and the fact that he can only achieve orgasm upon killing the woman. In "The Hands that Are Not There" the story focuses on a man telling a young (male) cadet a story of something that happened to him when he fell in love with a woman. Once again, she takes up a minority of the screentime, we are left to assume that she actually did anything dangerous, and she is seen through the eyes of a man. There were many other WTF moments in this anthology, but those are my top three. Shadows for Silence in the Forests of Hell is the only really really good story.

Has Dangerous Women turned you off from other books in this genre?

It's a cross-genre anthology. It did however turn me off to certain authors. For example, I will never read anything by Joe R. Lansdale after his treatment of the female character in "Wrestling Jesus" he missed the whole point of the prompt and only succeeded in pissing me off.

I will absolutely read more things by Brandon Sanderson, given that his entry appeared at just the right time to keep me from saying screw the whole thing, and he nailed the spirit of the anthology on the head with the line "A woman could be strong without having the emotions of a brick"

Did the narrators do a good job differentiating all the characters? How?

Overall they did a fairly good job. I liked Jonathan Frake's narration even though I didn't like the story he read. Claudia Black was fantastic. She was able to add just a hint of an accent here or there, and she really brought Shadows for Silence to life, I wish she would narrate more of Sanderson's stuff. Janis Ian on the other hand was flat, boring, toneless, and I could NOT tell her characters apart at all. That, and she did nothing to improve the flat, boring stories that she was reading for us.

Could you see Dangerous Women being made into a movie or a TV series? Who should the stars be?

No, it isn't the sort of book that lends itself well to that format.

Any additional comments?

Don't bother buying this. Read the goodreads reviews, find the top three stories you think you'll like, and stand in Barnes and Noble to read them, or find it in a library. Repeat: This is not worth the money.

1 of 3 people found this review helpful