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Elkobri

  • 11
  • reviews
  • 5
  • helpful votes
  • 53
  • ratings
  • Nine Pints

  • A Journey Through the Money, Medicine, and Mysteries of Blood
  • By: Rose George
  • Narrated by: Karen Cass
  • Length: 12 hrs and 41 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 39
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 37
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 37

Blood carries life, yet the sight of it makes people faint. It is a waste product and a commodity pricier than oil. It can save lives and transmit deadly infections. Author Rose George is renowned for her intrepid work on topics that are invisible but vitally important. In Nine Pints, she takes us from ancient practices of bloodletting to modern “hemovigilance” teams that track blood-borne diseases. She probes the lucrative business of plasma transfusions and looks to the future, as researchers seek to bring synthetic blood to a hospital near you.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • astounding!

  • By Clayton on 12-11-18

Funny science

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-24-19

The author and reader conspire to offer us laughable episodes together with heart stopping stories of struggle, error and breakthrough. My favorite chapter concerns trauma... she begins with the story of a tragic bicycle rider and takes us on a journey of extreme effort and humble failure.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Crashed

  • How a Decade of Financial Crises Changed the World
  • By: Adam Tooze
  • Narrated by: Simon Vance, Adam Tooze
  • Length: 25 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 240
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 216
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 215

Crashed is a dramatic new narrative resting on original themes: the haphazard nature of economic development and the erratic path of debt around the world; the unseen way individual countries and regions are linked together in deeply unequal relationships through financial interdependence, investment, politics, and force; the ways the financial crisis interacted with the spectacular rise of social media, the crisis of middle-class America, the rise of China, and global struggles over fossil fuels.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Incredible

  • By William Tutt on 08-08-18

super reader

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-14-18

comprehensive and yet moving along with a constant search for causes and connections. the author cautions us to avoid a fuzzy, imprecise summary of harrowing events and decisions.

  • Enlightenment Now

  • The Case for Reason, Science, Humanism, and Progress
  • By: Steven Pinker
  • Narrated by: Arthur Morey
  • Length: 19 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,170
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,710
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,664

Is the world really falling apart? Is the ideal of progress obsolete? In this elegant assessment of the human condition in the third millennium, cognitive scientist and public intellectual Steven Pinker urges us to step back from the gory headlines and prophecies of doom, which play to our psychological biases. Instead, follow the data: Pinker shows that life, health, prosperity, safety, peace, knowledge, and happiness are on the rise, not just in the West but worldwide.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • We live in the best of all times

  • By Neuron on 02-25-18

holy numbers

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-18-18

Facts about scientific progress in eliminating disease are presented in their rightful place. The author mostly preaches to the choir, but his emphasis on the numbers of people saved from misery is where the truth of his reasoning shines beyond refutation.

  • God’s Guide to a Good Life: Catholic Moral Theology

  • By: Fr. Kenneth R. Himes OFM PhD
  • Narrated by: Fr. Kenneth R. Himes OFM PhD
  • Length: 10 hrs and 7 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7

The course is structured in three parts. In the first, you will explore the meaning of moral theology generally, and in the second, you will come to understand how moral theology conceives of freedom, character, conscience, sin, and conversion. In the final part, you will explore how to use the Bible, reason, natural law, ecclesial context, and the Church's teaching office to inform moral theology. In these lectures, you will learn to translate your religious beliefs into values and actions. Fr. Himes's course uses the best ideas from Catholic moral theology.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • A little vague

  • By iesusv on 06-05-18

a voice to keep you engaged

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-02-18

As the author reads his work, he manages to convey his own lively interest in the subject as well as his appreciation for people who contribute to the ongoing dialogue about the good life. He presents Catholic thought without an attitude of superiority or condescension. His examples are quite memorable. I really wish this book was in kindle form as well!!!

  • Venomous

  • How Earth's Deadliest Creatures Mastered Biochemistry
  • By: Christie Wilcox
  • Narrated by: Emily Rankin
  • Length: 6 hrs and 35 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 264
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 245
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 241

In Venomous, molecular biologist Christie Wilcox investigates venoms and the animals that use them, revealing how they work, what they do to the human body, and how they can revolutionize biochemistry and medicine today. Wilcox takes us from the coast of Indonesia to the rainforests of Peru in search of the secrets of these mysterious animals.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Well worth reading

  • By Paul on 12-01-16

Emily is amazing

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-18-16

Would you listen to Venomous again? Why?

Yes, good information presented in a bright, happy way.

What other book might you compare Venomous to and why?

The Emperor of all maladies. Science with heart and compassion.

What about Emily Rankin’s performance did you like?

Lively, the right emphasis, interested in what she is reading, Involved in the story.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

Lady with lime disease bitten by African killer bees.

Any additional comments?

Thank you for the work making this book.

  • Brain Bugs

  • How the Brain’s Flaws Shape Our Lives
  • By: Dean Buonomano
  • Narrated by: William Hughes
  • Length: 8 hrs and 37 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 293
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 237
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 240

With its trillions of connections, the human brain is more beautiful and complex than anything we could ever build, but it’s far from perfect: our memory is unreliable; we can’t multiply large sums in our heads; advertising manipulates our judgment; we tend to distrust people who are different from us; supernatural beliefs and superstitions are hard to shake; we prefer instant gratification to long-term gain; and what we presume to be rational decisions are often anything but.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Superficial, but mostly correct

  • By Sean on 09-03-11

what about procreation bugs?

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-05-16

Would you say that listening to this book was time well-spent? Why or why not?

The book reviews the thought of many contemporary researchers and does so in an engaging way.

What do you think your next listen will be?

A book which outlines the road ahead with crisper gene splicing or a book on the implications of frigate bird flight into high energy clouds.

Have you listened to any of William Hughes’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

No, but he is a great reader. His voice carries just the right amount of excitement and happiness. He seems to enjoy what he is reading ... but not in a fanatical way. His voice carries the story along in a very positive direction.

Did Brain Bugs inspire you to do anything?

Ask myself why highly intelligent, scientific people tend to avoid the sacrifices necessary to have their genes multiplying in the human gene pool? Why be so down on the value of their own genetic inheritance and leave the field open to the "religious" fundamentalists?

Any additional comments?

He follows Dawkins and others in treating religion and philosophy with a condescending attitude that downplays the horror unleashed by the powerful nations of the last century who had no use for any kind of a god, other than one of their own imagining.

  • Stealing From God

  • Why Atheists Need God to Make Their Case
  • By: Frank Turek
  • Narrated by: John McLain
  • Length: 8 hrs and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 490
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 450
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 446

What if your best reasons to doubt God prove that He exists? In an engaging and memorable way, Stealing From God shows how many atheistic arguments, instead of disproving God, reveal that He actually exists.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • TERRIBLE NARRATOR

  • By Courtney Foster-Donahue on 10-22-16

a supercilious voice

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-30-15

Would you recommend this book to a friend? Why or why not?

Book yes, narration NO

What was one of the most memorable moments of Stealing From God?

reading rather than listening to this narrator

How did the narrator detract from the book?

The author is anything but proud or arrogant, but the narrator oozes a tone of voice that is completely different from Frank Turek.

Did Stealing From God inspire you to do anything?

Avoid the narrator or plead with him to change his tone of voice.

Any additional comments?

When a narrator projects a "smarter than thou" voice he takes a path that will turn people off from the contents of the book.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • The Sixth Extinction

  • An Unnatural History
  • By: Elizabeth Kolbert
  • Narrated by: Anne Twomey
  • Length: 9 hrs and 59 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,616
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,244
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,219

A major audiobook about the future of the world, blending intellectual and natural history and field reporting into a powerful account of the mass extinction unfolding before our eyes. Over the last half a billion years, there have been five mass extinctions, when the diversity of life on Earth suddenly and dramatically contracted. Scientists around the world are currently monitoring the sixth extinction, predicted to be the most devastating extinction event since the asteroid impact that wiped out the dinosaurs.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Lifts you out of the ordinary

  • By Regina on 04-28-14

beauty

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-24-15

beautiful voice with great pause and meaning which keeps one attentive to the text which is powerful and compassionate.

  • The Demon Under The Microscope

  • By: Thomas Hager
  • Narrated by: Stephen Hoye
  • Length: 12 hrs and 14 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,018
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,164
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,163

The Nazis discovered it. The Allies won the war with it. It conquered diseases, changed laws, and single-handedly launched the era of antibiotics. This incredible discovery was sulfa, the first antibiotic medication. In The Demon Under the Microscope, Thomas Hager chronicles the dramatic history of the drug that shaped modern medicine.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A fantastic book

  • By Sara on 09-02-08

appreciation for what goes into modern medicine

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-15-14

What did you love best about The Demon Under The Microscope?

The connections between the battlefield and the lab.

What did you like best about this story?

How it flows from one advance to the next, especially how dies play a part.

Which character – as performed by Stephen Hoye – was your favorite?

Domach

If you were to make a film of this book, what would the tag line be?

Hope where none was expected

  • Survival of the Sickest

  • A Medical Maverick Discovers Why We Need Disease
  • By: Sharon Moalem, Jonathan Prince
  • Narrated by: Eric Conger
  • Length: 6 hrs and 37 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 447
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 257
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 256

How did a deadly genetic disease help our ancestors survive the bubonic plagues of Europe? Was diabetes evolution's response to the last Ice Age? Will a visit to the tanning salon help bring down your cholesterol? Why do we age? Why are some people immune to HIV? Can your genes be turned on or off? Survival of the Sickest reveals the answers to these and many other questions as it unravels the amazing connections between evolution, disease, and human health today.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • An Eye Opener

  • By Maurice on 02-02-08

home run

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-15-14

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

I would absolutely recommend this audiobook as well as the book in any format. It is intriguing. The authors and narrator manage to convey excitement with provocative questions concerning the evolution of illnesses. This would be a great book for science classes in grammar and high school, etc.

What was one of the most memorable moments of Survival of the Sickest?

One of the authors' grandfather and how he wondered about his love of giving blood and then connected that experience with his later illnesses.

Which scene was your favorite?

Imagining the black death and people with hemochromatosis being able to help others. It is like the ugly duckling transformed into a swan.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

Yes and I wanted a digital copy to go back over it. I keep telling people that this is the best kind of science: when the authors take you into the unexpected and yet plausible. They excite the reader as if they were detectives on the hunt for clues to understand mysterious evolutionary riddles.

Any additional comments?

Tell the authors to keep writing more along this line.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful