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Anne

Overland Park, Kansas, United States
  • 22
  • reviews
  • 11
  • helpful votes
  • 23
  • ratings
  • The Drug Hunters

  • The Improbable Quest to Discover New Medicines
  • By: Donald R. Kirsch PhD, Ogi Ogas PhD
  • Narrated by: James Foster
  • Length: 7 hrs and 35 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,033
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 944
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 944

The search to find medicines is as old as disease, which is to say as old as the human race. Through serendipity - by chewing, brewing, and snorting - some Neolithic souls discovered opium, alcohol, snakeroot, juniper, frankincense, and other helpful substances. Ötzi the Iceman, the 5,000-year-old hunter frozen in the Italian Alps, was found to have whipworms in his intestines and Bronze Age medicine, a worm-killing birch fungus, knotted to his leggings.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Aargh!

  • By Curmud the prof on 05-20-17

Much more interesting the farther you get into it

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-29-19

This book is well organized and explains both the theory and luck behind many eras of "drug hunting. " Characters who contributed to both the science and ultimate use of drugs are well documented, and the strange stories around what was successful and what hindered success are really interesting. There are a few "lulls', but this is worth getting through. Especially if you are anywhere near the medical field. You will finish by wondering how it was that we have even the compounds we do have, and fearing that we may soon run out of good antibiotics because it is too difficult to develop and too expensive. There is always more to the story, but Drug Hunters does a strong job of telling the highlights with enough detail so you understand more of the obstacles and appreciate the successes more.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Reluctant Widow

  • By: Georgette Heyer
  • Narrated by: Cornelius Garrett
  • Length: 9 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,026
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 809
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 813

Penniless Elinor is rather surprised at the carriage that meets her from the stage, and more so at the decayed grandeur of the house to which she's transported. Realising that there has been a case of mistaken identity she agrees to an audacious plan.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The Governess's New Position

  • By Joseph R on 02-28-10

Not one of her best

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-29-19

The plot is good, the characters are all right, but Heyer forgot to make the Title Character lovable. Decent premise, but set in the Regency era would give us women who have limited options but if you are going to write a novel, the "widow" should be either more fun or at least stop protesting that she is being told what to do--and then going ahead and doing it. A good reader can't save a novel that needed an editor to shape up the cast of characters.

  • Murder in an English Village

  • By: Jessica Ellicott
  • Narrated by: Barbara Rosenblat
  • Length: 9 hrs and 26 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,592
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,390
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,376

The year is 1920: Flying in the face of convention, legendary American adventuress Beryl Helliwell never fails to surprise and shock. The last thing her adoring public would expect is that she craves some peace and quiet. The humdrum hamlet of Walmsley Parva in the English countryside seems just the ticket. And, honestly, until America comes to its senses and repeals Prohibition, Beryl has no intention of returning stateside and subjecting herself to bathtub gin.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Can't Wait For Next Book

  • By Sally W. Harris on 05-22-18

Post WW I mystery, light-hearted, nice framework

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-29-19

This is the genre of "cozy mystery" in that there is likely skulduggery going on, but no one gets their head bashed in and everyone stops for tea or cocktail at intervals. Set a few years after the close of World War I, the two "sleuths" are middle aged but not boring and work well together. There is some interesting detail around the conduct of WW I projects at home and how veterans managed after going back to their normal lives. The end was well done and not predictable; the reader did a very good job, and I will look for the next in the series. Light and fun series.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • A High-End Finish

  • By: Kate Carlisle
  • Narrated by: Angela Starling
  • Length: 8 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,533
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1,402
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,397

In the seaside town of Lighthouse Cove, everyone knows the best man for the job is actually a woman - contractor Shannon Hammer. But while Shannon can do wonders with a power drill and a little elbow grease, her love life needs work. On a blind date with real estate agent Jerry Saxton, she has to whip out a pair of pliers to keep Jerry from getting too hands on.Shannon is happy to put her rotten date behind her, but when Jerry's found dead in a run-down Victorian home that she's been hired to restore, the town's attractive new police chief suspects that her threats may have laid the foundation for murder.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • It was ok

  • By Diana on 12-19-14

Good for a sale book, but too formulaic

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-21-18

I rather liked the characters, but the plot was a bit unbelievable, and it seemed pretty surprising that the protagonist hadn't dated in 8 years for no good reason even though she is in her 20's and that the first time she gets interested in men interested in her they are both amazingly handsome. I chose this because I have enjoyed the Hallmark movies based on this series; the TV series is better. I also found it pitiful that a contractor with a successful business was still hanging on to her frustration and sensitivity to the "mean girls" from high school who lived in her town. That was apparently intended to make it plain that Shannon didn't have everything her own way, but in real life surely she would have learned to brush them off. Good concept, but too much fluff for me

  • Closed Casket

  • The New Hercule Poirot Mystery
  • By: Sophie Hannah, Agatha Christie
  • Narrated by: Julian Rhind-Tutt
  • Length: 10 hrs and 10 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 437
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 399
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 396

Internationally best-selling author Sophie Hannah and the world's favorite detective, Hercule Poirot, return in this follow-up to The Monogram Murders, the national best seller hailed by the Washington Post as "literary magic".

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • This story is bonkers

  • By Ms Lixie on 10-17-16

Strong Performance can't rescue a ridiculous story

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-21-18

I kept reading because I had invested time for the setting up of the stories and characters, but I won't be looking for this author again. Almost none of the characters were likable, and when you find a nurse who theoretically has a good mind and good training hopelessly in love with a man she knows to be a pathological liar, and caricatures of Agatha Christie types, you get pretty disgusted. The reader is excellent, but it was a good thing this was on sale, and even then I was disappointed.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Etiquette & Espionage

  • Finishing School, Book 1
  • By: Gail Carriger
  • Narrated by: Moira Quirk
  • Length: 8 hrs and 55 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,179
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,903
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,909

Fourteen-year old Sophronia is the bane of her mother's existence. More interested in dismantling clocks and climbing trees than proper etiquette at tea - and god forbid anyone see her atrocious curtsy - Mrs. Temminnick is desperate her daughter become a proper lady. She enrolls Sophronia in Mademoiselle Geraldine's Finishing Academy for Young Ladies of Quality.

But little do Sophronia or her mother know that this is a school where ingenious young girls learn to finish all right - but it's a different kind of finishing.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Great book!

  • By Jessica on 03-20-13

Annoying

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-04-16

I am not opposed to this genre, but you should have a feeling for which character you might like, which you won't and what the conflict is. There are so many requirements for suspension of disbelief that I couldn't last 40 minutes. I got this on sale and it still wasn't worth the money. However, the reader is good, and it may just be I don't care for this type of fiction enough.

  • The Crime at Black Dudley

  • An Albert Campion Mystery
  • By: Margery Allingham
  • Narrated by: David Thorpe
  • Length: 7 hrs and 33 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 424
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 377
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 380

When George Abbershaw is invited to Black Dudley Manor for the weekend, he has only one thing on his mind - proposing to Meggie Oliphant. Unfortunately for George, things don't quite go according to plan. A harmless game turns decidedly deadly and suspicions of murder take precedence over matrimony. Trapped in a remote country house with a murderer, George can see no way out. But Albert Campion can.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • I LIKE this narrator quite a lot!!!!

  • By Meep on 11-16-13

Surprised at how bad this was.

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-24-14

I remembered liking several of Margery Allingham's books when I was younger, but I had never read this one--and I hadn't missed a thing. The characters are unsympathetic and naïve; the narrator picked a bizarre voice for Campion, and the plot was abysmal. This must have been an early effort because it is poorly executed and a ridiculous plot. Can't tell if Allingham doesn't write as well as I thought she did or the PBS series done several years ago corrected her mistakes or it just is too dated--but don't waste your time here.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • The Boys in the Boat

  • Nine Americans and Their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics
  • By: Daniel James Brown
  • Narrated by: Edward Herrmann
  • Length: 14 hrs and 24 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 27,663
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 25,162
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 25,105

Daniel James Brown's robust book tells the story of the University of Washington's 1936 eight-oar crew and their epic quest for an Olympic gold medal, a team that transformed the sport and grabbed the attention of millions of Americans. The sons of loggers, shipyard workers, and farmers, the boys defeated elite rivals first from eastern and British universities and finally the German crew rowing for Adolf Hitler in the Olympic games in Berlin, 1936.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Do you believe in miracles??

  • By Janice on 07-12-13

Amazing, all the more impressive since true

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-03-14

Most of us don't row, and we don't row competitively. This is so well written that you are intrigued by the technical aspects of rowing, but you are absolutely captivated by the people a lved this piece of history. Each individual is well painted and integrated and Brown has given us context so we can feel the Great Depression and the stunning struggle just to get food, much less get to college and make the rowing team. The "boys" were all sons of miners and farmers and shopkeepers and yet achieved the distinction of becoming the finest rowing team in history. Edward Hermann always delivers a fantastic presentation, but he was given a book that serves his talents well--that tells the story of the times, the obstacles, the character and heart of the individuals involved, and the breath-taking outcome. You will miss a great book and a great performance if this doesn't hit your preferred list. You will be moved, astonished, grieving, and joyous with all the characters.

  • More Than Words Can Say

  • A Novel
  • By: Robert Barclay
  • Narrated by: Cassandra Campbell
  • Length: 12 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars 55
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 44
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars 47

Chelsea Enright never expected to inherit her grandmother's lakeside cottage deep in the Adirondacks - a serene getaway that had been mysteriously closed up decades ago. This is no simple bequest, however, because when Chelsea finds her grandmother's World War II diaries, she's stunned to discover that they hold secrets she never suspected - and they have the power to turn her own life upside down.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Oh Lordy

  • By Patti on 02-04-14

Melodramatic

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-22-13

I can't honestly tell if the story ever got any better. The first 30 minutes introduced a bit of the mystery but also characters that I had no sympathy or interest in. I am sorry I bought this and will avoid anything by this author again. So if you like cliches and stereotypes, go for this but otherwise don't waste your time

  • Lady Fortescue Steps Out

  • The Poor Relation, Book 1
  • By: M. C. Beaton
  • Narrated by: Davina Porter
  • Length: 4 hrs and 45 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,831
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,554
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,555

Life is not easy for the poor relations of England’s upper crust, but fate and clever schemes bring them together. Lady Fortescue and Colonel Sandhurst hatch a plan: What if they were to transform her decrepit Bond Street home into a posh hotel, offering their guests the pleasure of being waited upon by nobility? With the help of other down-and-out aristocrats, they do just that, and London’s newest hotel, The Poor Relation, is born. The establishment is an immediate hit with London’s most illustrious citizens, save the Duke of Rowcester....

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Charming Regency Fun - Romance & Adventure

  • By Clare on 05-04-12

Playing Fast and Loose with Regency Style

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-03-13

M. C. Beaton normally writes contemporary mysteries. This isn't, of course, a mystery, and the plot is fine, the characters are all right, but it is neither bodice-ripper (thank goodness) nor comedy of manners based on the constraints of the period in which it is set. While it would have short-circuited the plot to have the protagonists display the background expected, it seems just silly to propose the idea that a gentlewoman would have learned how to cook so well that she would have been able to turn out multi-course meals appropriate in fine dining establishments during the Napoleonic era. And that a gentleman would be so intemporate in his language to one of his own class. So this is definitely fluff and if you aren't looking for Jane Austen or Finess it is just fine but be prepared to roll your eyes if you keep listening.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful