LISTENER

Sumguynobuddynoes

Sioux Falls, SD, United States
  • 16
  • reviews
  • 35
  • helpful votes
  • 54
  • ratings
  • Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl

  • By: Harriet Jacobs
  • Narrated by: Audio Élan
  • Length: 8 hrs and 5 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 213
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 185
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 184

Harriet Jacobs’ autobiography, written under the pseudonym Linda Brent, details her experiences as a slave in North Carolina, her escape to freedom in the north, and her ensuing struggles to free her children. The narrative was partly serialized in the New York Tribune, but was discontinued because Jacobs’ depictions of the sexual abuse of female slaves were considered too shocking. It was published in book form in 1861.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great book!

  • By Shakayla on 03-31-13

The real story.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-22-19

Listening to actual persons who were under the bondage of slavery in the US before the Civil War, slavery is better defined as benevolent and dastardly, nurturing and tyrannical, kind and cruel, all depending on who were the masters. Unbeknownst by myself, there were many moral slave owners who respected their slaves and provided them good food, empowering responsibilities, teaching trade skills, treating them as family, days of rest each week, reasonable work hours, not beaten as a form of punishment, allowed to stay in family units together, and allowing them freedom to come and go around their community near their plantation. Thereby the slaves were very happy with their situation and worked harder than those other slaves being starved and beaten by neighboring masters. Other slave owners would not expose their slaves to the slaves of such just masters. Even after emancipation the slaves would stay and work for their previous masters because of their fair and kind treatment.
However, they were still restricted to actions dictated by their owners and still subject to slave laws that considered them as chattel without regard to the sanctity of life. Though there were good owners, these owners were rare (though not as rare as I had previously been led to believe) and hated by other slave owners who were cruel by nature to persons that they did not consider of any value other than financial gain. I suspect, that good slave owner stories simply did not sell books or interest persons as a human interest story at the time. The appalling treatment was the catalyst that drove the insatiable desire to experience the edge of emotional reason to excite the curiosity of something so counter to our own paradigms.
Other stories were so horrendous that perceiving the reality of such brutality is almost outside of our ability to comprehend. Nazi atrocities have hardened our minds to be able to look upon such atrocities and realize that they were real. How would the early 20th century citizen digest such despicable human behavior without rejecting the reality of the events as implausible.
Though slavery is embedded in many cultural histories, it is usually with greater humanity than what was experienced in the southern United States.
Less than 3% of the world's black slave trade was diverted to the U.S. but as the industrial revolution increased the societal standard of living, the question of bondage as a justifiable institution was spread as a cause for all men to be free. The south did not get the memo.

  • Trading in the Zone

  • Master the Market with Confidence, Discipline, and a Winning Attitude
  • By: Mark Douglas
  • Narrated by: Kaleo Griffith
  • Length: 7 hrs and 57 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 402
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 341
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 335

Douglas uncovers the underlying reasons for lack of consistency and helps traders overcome the ingrained mental habits that cost them money. He takes on the myths of the market and exposes them one by one teaching traders to look beyond random outcomes, to understand the true realities of risk, and to be comfortable with the "probabilities" of market movement that governs all market speculation.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Most important trading book I own!

  • By Penelope Frey on 07-24-18

Excellent insight to practical trading without the bells and whistles that many consider essential to understanding the market.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-27-18

Most of the book defines why and how you behave as a person learning about trading. The fallacies are revealed early about the fluff that distracts even the most savvy and experienced trader. These downfalls are revealed and a pathway how to overcome ones perception of reality in the market is stripped down to the simplest of principles. So simple, that it is rejected by ones own prejudices on how the market should be interpreted and so the learned blind themselves to this secret of success.
I guess this makes it easier for the rest of us troglodytes.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Forgotten Soldier

  • By: Guy Sajer
  • Narrated by: Derek Perkins
  • Length: 21 hrs and 48 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,624
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 1,491
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,484

When Guy Sajer joins the infantry full of ideals in the summer of 1942, the German army is enjoying unparalleled success in Russia. However, he quickly finds that for the foot soldier the glory of military success hides a much harsher reality of hunger, fatigue, and constant deprivation. Posted to the elite Grosse Deutschland division, he enters a violent and remorseless world where all youthful hope is gradually ground down, and all that matters is the brute will to survive.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Beautifully Written Heartrending Tragedy

  • By Gillian on 03-31-17

Most descriptive piece of non-fiction on life in a constant war zone.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-17-18

WW2 French soldier enlisted in the German regular army. His experiences from the beginning of the war to his escapades on the Russian front in the east to his eventual surrender to allied soldiers on the Western front.
The realities of war when one must continue to fight without logistic support. Long periods of fighting with short resbits as he recovers from the maladies and hardships that war introduces that we take for granted like dysentery, lice infestation, starvation, frostbite, fighting and marching while injured, numbness to constant death, etc...
An excellent perspective from someone in the regular army of the enemy that was unaware of much of the SS, Gestapo, and German high command atrocities that were happening elsewhere. We forget that most of the regular army and the German people were kept in the dark about most of the heinous crimes that were perpetrated.
More harrowing than “Band of Brothers”. Despair visits regularly. Excellent experience to understand the foot soldier experience of war.

  • The Jungle

  • By: Upton Sinclair
  • Narrated by: David McCallion
  • Length: 13 hrs and 48 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 29
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 26
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 26

The Jungle tells the brutal reality of industrial Chicago in the early 1900s through the eyes of an immigrant. Fresh from Lithuania, Jurgis; his wife, Ona; and their family are forced to scrape for survival after moving to Chicago in hopes of chasing the American Dream. From the very beginning, they fall upon hard times when the house they purchase is found to be in shabby condition and has hidden fees that the family can't afford. With the financial burden that the family is faced with, even the youngest family members are forced to find jobs in plants and factories to contribute what they can.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Stay away from canned meat

  • By MNash on 07-25-16

Graphic, despondent, disheartening.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-04-18

Following a turn of the century immigrant and his family in the first decade of the 20th century and his behind the scenes expeiences of the Chicago stockyards, meat industry, political corruption, class distinctions, democratic institutions, graft, starvation, poor, rich, capitalists and finally a call to socialism. The book was written before the Bolshevik revolution and as such candy coats the socialist dream which will never work with the human nature of competition and self preservation.
It still spwaks to the human condition today where corruption has not been replaced with idealism. Greed is as addictive as any drug. It continues today.

  • Sex at Dawn

  • How We Mate, Why We Stray, and What It Means for Modern Relationships
  • By: Christopher Ryan, Cacilda Jetha
  • Narrated by: Allyson Johnson, Jonathan Davis, Christopher Ryan (Preface)
  • Length: 10 hrs and 57 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,645
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,582
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,566

Since Darwin's day, we've been told that sexual monogamy comes naturally to our species. Mainstream science - as well as religious and cultural institutions - has maintained that men and women evolved in families in which a man's possessions and protection were exchanged for a woman's fertility and fidelity. But this narrative is collapsing....

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Strawmen and Ad Hominems

  • By Carolyn on 09-18-12

Definite agenda.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-22-17

By refuting any anthropological and archeological evidences as misinterpretations, the author does the same by also making assumptions by weak interpretations connecting the dots to fit her vision. It is like multiple people deciphering a jumble of letters by their own life's paradigm assigning familiar words to each character and producing entirely different meaning that makes sense only to the author who then bolsters ones position with proofs that seem apparent to the originator of the theory while wildly different between "experts". But no one knows the real intent of the hand that scrawled those cryptic letters. So we have soothsayers to try to read the mind of the original writer.
By discrediting others she also puts in question her own quest for truth. Oddities of human behavior in all corners of the earth can be used to justify any abhorrent character as a subliminal social norm long forgotten. We think that somehow man has progressed as a uniform society and not as more regional and local histories more isolated than we would like to assume. It is like treating a child raised in the Louisiana Bayou to have experienced the same realities as it's counterpart raised as an Eskimo in the frozen North.

  • Infidel

  • By: Ayaan Hirsi Ali
  • Narrated by: Ayaan Hirsi Ali
  • Length: 16 hrs and 33 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,757
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,973
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,979

This New York Times best-seller is the astonishing life story of award-winning humanitarian Ayaan Hirsi Ali. A deeply respected advocate for free speech and women's rights, Hirsi Ali also lives under armed protection because of her outspoken criticism of the Islamic faith in which she was raised.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Tough, Candid Assessment

  • By Paul Mullen on 02-18-08

Heartfelt personal observation of a young girl opening her eyes.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-06-17

A transitional voyage from the perspective of an Islamic young female in the African Somalian family culture running away to avoid a forced marriage. Only to discover a new world of the infidels is actually a more realistic view of life and the world. Kind of like

  • The Age of Em

  • Work, Love, and Life When Robots Rule the Earth
  • By: Robin Hanson
  • Narrated by: Michael Butler Murray
  • Length: 15 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 82
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 68
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 69

Robots may one day rule the world, but what is a robot-ruled Earth like? Many think the first truly smart robots will be brain emulations, or ems. Scan a human brain, then run a model with the same connections on a fast computer, and you have a robot brain, but recognizably human. Train an em to do some job and copy it a million times; an army of workers is at your disposal. When they can be made cheaply, within perhaps a century, ems will displace humans in most jobs.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • An analytical book suited as a reference book

  • By Ageel Alassif on 03-30-17

interesting but way too thorough

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-20-17

Great number if assumptions draws upon authors perception of Emulation robot society and behaviours.
Interesting concept, but too intricate in detail to be credible. Got boring in the details of Em societal workings.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Rise and Fall of American Growth

  • The U.S. Standard of Living Since the Civil War
  • By: Robert J. Gordon
  • Narrated by: Michael Butler Murray
  • Length: 30 hrs and 14 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 380
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 323
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 322

In the century after the Civil War, an economic revolution improved the American standard of living in ways previously unimaginable. Electric lighting, indoor plumbing, home appliances, motor vehicles, air travel, air conditioning, and television transformed households and workplaces. With medical advances, life expectancy between 1870 and 1970 grew from 45 to 72 years. The Rise and Fall of American Growth provides an in-depth account of this momentous era.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The book is a great review of how we got to where we are today

  • By isaiah on 09-13-16

The TRUE American History.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-12-17

This book reveals where the common man (species non-gender specific) developed as a result of the level of the tools invented/discovered to influence both the person and the environment. A real history of mankind as a species mastering it's environment. Statistics can be boring, but the fascinating speed which change has occurred is transcendent.
A true answer to "How we arrived at where we are today." Along with the anticipated soothsaying of the uncomfortable future.

  • The Magician's Nephew

  • The Chronicles of Narnia
  • By: C.S. Lewis
  • Narrated by: Kenneth Branagh
  • Length: 3 hrs and 57 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,305
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 4,574
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 4,581

Digory and Polly meet and become friends one cold, wet summer in London. Their lives burst into adventure when Digory's Uncle Andrew, who thinks he is a magician, sends them hurtling to...somewhere else. They find their way to Narnia, newborn from the Lion's song, and encounter the evil sorceress Jadis, before they finally return home.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Enchanting

  • By Sean Calvert on 06-02-05

Magical fantasy

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-10-16

A great story that sheds light on his first book "The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe". How Narnia came to be, where the witch came from, why the wardrobe was magical in the fist place, and how that weird lamppost got to be alone in the woods lighting the way from our world to Narnia. Quite a feat to connect all the dots and remove the mystery of unanswered questions.

  • Human Prehistory and the First Civilizations

  • By: Brian M. Fagan, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: Brian M. Fagan
  • Length: 18 hrs and 10 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 638
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 575
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 569

Where do we come from? How did our ancestors settle this planet? How did the great historic civilizations of the world develop? How does a past so shadowy that it has to be painstakingly reconstructed from fragmentary, largely unwritten records nonetheless make us who and what we are?

These 36 lectures bring you the answers that the latest scientific and archaeological research and theorizing suggest about human origins, how populations developed, and the ways in which civilizations spread throughout the globe.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Great Conceptually But Becoming Dated

  • By JCurtis on 09-25-13

Ancient ancestry revealed through archeology.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-09-15

You can tell the professor is really excited about the subject matter. I really appreciate when the material is presented as not "absolute". That as discoveries are made historical views will also shift to fit the new evidence. Perhaps never really being accurate, but our best educated "guess". The insight is revealing;: where food and water was abundant civilizations thrived. Without it they dwindled. Well worth the journey to listen to this course. "