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Scott T. Hards

Tatebayashi, Gunma Japan
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  • 94
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  • Buddhism Without Beliefs

  • By: Stephen Batchelor
  • Narrated by: Stephen Batchelor
  • Length: 4 hrs and 21 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 231
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 196
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 195

Demystifing the tenets of Buddhism, this introduction to the Buddhist religion explains, without jargon or obscure terminology, the essential elements of its teachings, presents ways to work toward awakening, and examines Buddhism's relevance in Western culture.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Play it at 1.25x speed

  • By Brian Northum on 04-20-16

Not for Buddhism beginners

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-24-18

I believe I first heard about this on the 10% happier podcast and dove in. Yikes. Chapters alternated between being deeply thoughtful and idea-provoking, and being utterly inaccessible to someone like myself who has no focused study of Buddhism yet. Some passages almost felt like they’d be written with a random word generator, but this reflects my unpreparedness for the material more than its quality. The author’s narration of his own work is quite good, but you may want to try 1.25x playback.

  • The Boys in the Cave

  • Deep Inside the Impossible Rescue in Thailand
  • By: Matt Gutman
  • Narrated by: Matt Gutman
  • Length: 9 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 52
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 49
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 49

From award-winning ABC News Chief National Correspondent Matt Gutman, and written using exclusive interviews and information comes the definitive account of the dramatic story that gripped the world: the miracle rescue of 12 boys and their soccer coach trapped in a flooded cave miles underground for nearly three weeks - a pulse-pounding account by a reporter who was there every step of their journey out. 

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Wanted much more about what happened inside

  • By Scott T. Hards on 12-22-18

Wanted much more about what happened inside

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-22-18

It would be hard to write a boring book about this unbelievably dramatic rescue, and this does hold your interest. Gutman has done a fair enough job of getting details about the actual rescue, in particular the foreign teams who planned and executed this thing at the risk of their lives. But probably due to the language barrier, we get precious little about what was happening with the Thai Seals, or most importantly, the actual boys in the cave. Far more post-rescue interviews with the Thais involved would have helped immensely. How did those kids pass the days? Hardly anything on this.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Being Mortal

  • Medicine and What Matters in the End
  • By: Atul Gawande
  • Narrated by: Robert Petkoff
  • Length: 9 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 7,951
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 6,978
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,965

In Being Mortal, bestselling author Atul Gawande tackles the hardest challenge of his profession: how medicine can not only improve life but also the process of its ending. Medicine has triumphed in modern times, transforming birth, injury, and infectious disease from harrowing to manageable. But in the inevitable condition of aging and death, the goals of medicine seem too frequently to run counter to the interest of the human spirit.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Required Reading!

  • By Jeffrey on 10-13-14

Every human over 45 should read this

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-19-17

The world would be a far better place if all people could come to terms with their own mortality. Much needless worry and suffering could be spared. Whether you believe in a glorious afterlife, or returning to the same state you were before birth, it doesn't matter. What does matter is avoiding ridiculous struggles to prolong lives that cannot and should not be saved, especially at the expense of quality of life.

That is the simple but brilliant message Dr. Gawande brings us here, and it's narrated perfectly by Robert Petkoff in probably the best nonfiction narration I have ever heard on Audible (over 100 books).

Well the second half of the book gets a little heavy on the personal anecdote side, the messages are still relevant.

If you or someone you love is potentially facing an end-of-life situation in the near future, you owe it to yourself and/or them to read this book now!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Zero K

  • By: Don DeLillo
  • Narrated by: Thomas Sadoski
  • Length: 7 hrs and 48 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 345
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 308
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 307

Jeffrey Lockhart's father, Ross, is a billionaire in his 60s with a younger wife, Artis Martineau, whose health is failing. Ross is the primary investor in a remote and secret compound where death is exquisitely controlled and bodies are preserved until a future time when biomedical advances and new technologies can return them to lives of transcendent promise. Jeff joins Ross and Artis at the compound to say "an uncertain farewell" to her as she surrenders her body.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Frightening. Redemptive. Brilliant.

  • By Doug - Audible on 07-05-17

Beautiful words with no story to tell

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-10-17

The book swings repeatedly from the amazingly poignant and thought-provoking to the crushingly dull, with more of the latter, sadly. This is my first Don DeLillo novel, and given his celebrity, I would like to think it's far from his best. Perhaps the most annoying is how he endlessly describes mundane things that have nothing to do with what little story the book does have: how the narrator plays with items in his pocket, how a passerby on the street was dressed, etc., as if he just wants to show you his amazing ability to describe things and notice the little things in life. And he does have that skill, to be sure, but a string of such observances does not make for a compelling novel. The book also lacks any interesting characters. I found myself having no emotional attachment to anyone on these pages.

I was able to finish the book only through the skill of the narrator, Thomas Sadoski, my first encounter with him as well. His pacing and tone are near perfect. If he can boost his ability to do character voices a bit more, he'll be in the realm of the greats like Simon Vance.

  • The Winter Fortress: The Epic Mission to Sabotage Hitler's Atomic Bomb

  • By: Neal Bascomb
  • Narrated by: Chris Sorensen
  • Length: 14 hrs and 7 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 340
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 316
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 316

It's 1942 and the Nazis are racing to be the first to build a weapon unlike any known before. They have the physicists, they have the uranium, and now all their plans depend on amassing a single ingredient: heavy water, which is produced in Norway's Vemork, the lone plant in all the world that makes this rare substance. Under threat of death, Vemork's engineers push production into overdrive. For the Allies, the plant must be destroyed.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Needs a different narrator!!!!

  • By Scott on 06-04-16

"Epic" indeed!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-16-17

Whether this mission saved the world or not is a topic that historians have and will debate for ages. But it takes nothing away from the incredible bravery and patriotism displayed by the men in the story. A must for any and all military history buffs. The narration is pretty generic, however.

  • The Age of Absurdity

  • Why Modern Life Makes It Hard to Be Happy
  • By: Michael Foley
  • Narrated by: John O'Mahony
  • Length: 9 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 64
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 59
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 59

The good news is that the great thinkers from history have proposed the same strategies for happiness and fulfilment. The bad news is that these turn out to be the very things most discouraged by contemporary culture. This knotty dilemma is the subject of The Age of Absurdity - a wry and accessible investigation into how the desirable states of well-being and satisfaction are constantly undermined by modern life.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • A curmudgeonly rant

  • By Jeremy Sanderson on 11-09-17

A few tidbits here and there, but primarily an old man's rant

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-24-17

If you come away with anything from this book, it should be that "the striving for happiness is itself the happiness." There are several variations on the theme repeated around the book. But unfortunately, most of it just comes across as an older guy passing snarky, sarcastic judgment on some of society's newer trends. In particular, his obvious derision for people who derive pleasure from video games is cringe-inducing.
In many examples, he brings up ridiculous strawmen and then dutifully crushes them as he attempts to point out the "absurdity" of modern life. But I doubt many of the likely readers of this book has ever fallen to some of the depths that he uses as examples.
I'm not sure whether I should praise or damn Audible for using an Irish narrator to read an Irish author's book, but it is Mr. O'Mahony's reading which gives this title all of its dripping sarcasm, whether or not that was the original author's intent.

  • Spook Country

  • By: William Gibson
  • Narrated by: Robertson Dean
  • Length: 11 hrs and 2 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 818
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 337
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 347

Bobby Chombo is a "producer" and an enigma. In his day job, Bobby is a troubleshooter for manufacturers of military navigation equipment. He refuses to sleep in the same place twice. He meets no one. Hollis Henry, an investigative journalist, has been told to find him.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Loved it

  • By wendy on 10-01-11

Style over substance

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-18-17

This was my first experience with William Gibson. While he certainly is a talented describer of people, situations and events, I was completely underwhelmed by this book's story, and its tremendously anti-climactic finish. Robertson Dean is a fantastic narrator, but his deep baritone makes for some difficulty when he's doing female characters, of which this book has plenty.

  • When Breath Becomes Air

  • By: Paul Kalanithi, Abraham Verghese - foreword
  • Narrated by: Sunil Malhotra, Cassandra Campbell
  • Length: 5 hrs and 35 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 19,656
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 17,516
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 17,462

At the age of 36, on the verge of completing a decade's worth of training as a neurosurgeon, Paul Kalanithi was diagnosed with stage IV lung cancer. One day he was a doctor treating the dying, and the next he was a patient struggling to live. And just like that, the future he and his wife had imagined evaporated.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Inspirational yet Existential Crisis Inducing

  • By Celia on 05-31-16

Death is inherently dramatic

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-15-17

There's a lot of love, courage and stoicism in this short but uplifting work. If nothing else, try to take away from it that we're all mortal. Death is no tragedy, but a part of our existence. I hope I can make my exit as elegantly as Paul did, and surrounded by such loving family. The narrator, Sunil Malhotra, was fabulous, a perfect pick for this material.

  • The Checklist Manifesto

  • How to Get Things Right
  • By: Atul Gawande
  • Narrated by: John Bedford Lloyd
  • Length: 6 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,416
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,527
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,528

We live in a world of great and increasing complexity, where even the most expert professionals struggle to master the tasks they face. Longer training, ever more advanced technologies - neither seems to prevent grievous errors. But in a hopeful turn, acclaimed surgeon and writer Atul Gawande finds a remedy in the humblest and simplest of techniques: the checklist.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Riveting!

  • By Tad Davis on 01-11-10

A simple truth, elegantly documented

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-28-16

Here is your super-abridged version of this book: "Checklists are awesome. Use them". But even though you now know the point of the material, you will still find reading this book extremely enlightening. Careful documentation of human fallibility, and examples from numerous disciplines as to how checklists can improve life and save lives make for a great read that will have you looking for ways to incorporate them into your own life.

Superb narration by Mr. Lloyd as well.

  • Trigger Warning

  • Short Fictions and Disturbances
  • By: Neil Gaiman
  • Narrated by: Neil Gaiman
  • Length: 11 hrs and 1 min
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,336
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,083
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,070

In this new anthology, Neil Gaiman pierces the veil of reality to reveal the enigmatic, shadowy world that lies beneath. Trigger Warning includes previously published pieces of short fiction--stories, verse, and a very special Doctor Who story that was written for the fiftieth anniversary of the beloved series in 2013--as well as "Black Dog", a new tale that revisits the world of American Gods, exclusive to this collection.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • It Triggered Me to Stay Up Late and Listen

  • By Jan on 02-10-15

Far from his best

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-12-16

I found none of the stories in this book to be particularly interesting, with the exception of the Doctor Who episode, and the final "Black Dog." The others start somewhat promisingly, but finish with dull thuds that leave one wondering what the point was. Gaiman's longer works are far more satisfying. He is, however, one of the very best narrators that reads their own work.