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Eleanor

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  • 51
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  • Motherless Brooklyn

  • By: Jonathan Lethem
  • Narrated by: Geoffrey Cantor
  • Length: 10 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 412
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 376
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 376

From America's most inventive novelist, Jonathan Lethem, comes this compelling and compulsive riff on the classic detective novel. Lionel Essrog is Brooklyn's very own Human Freakshow, an orphan whose Tourettic impulses drive him to bark, count, and rip apart language in startling and original ways. Together with three veterans of the St. Vincent's Home for Boys, he works for small-time mobster Frank Minna's limo service cum detective agency. Life without Frank, the charismatic King of Brooklyn, would be unimaginable.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • You're Not the Only Freak Show in Town!

  • By Dave on 05-01-14

Such a pleasure to listen to

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-17-15

The book is a serious exploration of a narrator with a much richer and smarter and more bookish interior life than anyone expects him to have. And the way Lethem plays with language is amazing.
Cantor is the perfect reader. His accent and his pacing and his rhythm are perfect, and he does a great job with Lionel's ticks. His Maine accent is not so great, but there's very little of it.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Peripheral

  • By: William Gibson
  • Narrated by: Lorelei King
  • Length: 14 hrs and 5 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,314
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,170
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,187

Where Flynne and her brother, Burton, live, jobs outside the drug business are rare. Fortunately, Burton has his veteran's benefits, for neural damage he suffered from implants during his time in the USMC's elite Haptic Recon force. Then one night Burton has to go out, but there's a job he's supposed to do - a job Flynne didn't know he had. Beta-testing part of a new game, he tells her.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Incredibly great across the board

  • By Christopher R McLaughlin on 04-27-15

Kind of disappointing

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-22-15

I generally like near future speculative fiction (e.g. Stross's Halting State or Gibson's All Tomorrow's Parties and Pattern Recognition) but this book never really grabbed me. The book starts in media res, in a way that is confusing, alienating (since it starts with the most unlikable characters) and weirdly similar to the beginning of Stross's Accelerado. I found it very hard to care about most of the characters. I think Gibson was aiming for noir, but he ended up with a kind of Apple Store shallow gloss. And King's general lack of affect didn't help. I also got very frustrated with the speculative fiction aspect. His information time travel idea opens up all kinds of potential plot complications which are never addressed.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • The Stress of Her Regard

  • By: Tim Powers
  • Narrated by: Simon Vance
  • Length: 16 hrs and 57 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 194
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 169
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 171

When Michael Crawford discovers his bride brutally murdered in their wedding bed, he is forced to flee not only to prove his innocence but to avoid the deadly embrace of a vampire who has claimed him as her true bridegroom. Joining forces with Byron, Keats, and Shelley in a desperate journey that crisscrosses Europe, Crawford desperately seeks his freedom from this vengeful lover who haunts his dreams and will not rest until she destroys all that he cherishes.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Terrifying - A New Benchmark for Vampires Stories

  • By Dave on 01-17-12

Tried to pack to much in

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-21-13

I am a big Tim Powers fan, but his books can be really hit or miss. The Stress of Her Regard has so many great Tim Power elements -- vast inhuman intelligences, multiple personalities, twins, the morally weak protagonist who has to undergo all kinds of humiliation, in depth historical research, writing and muses, particle physics as a form of magic, the reimagining of mythical figures. But this book feels about twice as long as I would have wanted it to be. Or maybe it would have been better as two books? But, still definitely worth it, because it's got vampires and Lord Byron and Percy Shelley, John Keats and Mary Shelley.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Zoobiquity

  • What Animals Can Teach Us About Health and the Science of Healing
  • By: Barbara Natterson-Horowitz, Kathryn Bowers
  • Narrated by: Karen White
  • Length: 12 hrs and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 167
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 144
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 145

Delving into evolution, anthropology, sociology, biology, veterinary science, and zoology, they break down the walls between disciplines, redefining the boundaries of medicine. Zoobiquity explores how animal and human commonality can be used to diagnose, treat, and heal patients of all species. Both authoritative and accessible, offering cutting-edge research through captivating narratives, this provocative book encourages us to see our essential connection to all living beings

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Fascinating Book on Human & Animal Medicine

  • By Zack on 06-16-12

Really the worst evolutionary psychology book ever

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-25-13

I'm fascinated by all the recent discoveries about the scientific nature of consciousness, but I'm getting pretty sick of the evolutionary psychology books, which seem to make sweeping generalizations based on scant data. And this book was the worst. The author cherry picked examples of animal behavior from all over the place and made direct comparisons to human behavior. It is one thing to try to understand human sexuality by looking at chimps and bonobos, but insects? And even horses seemed like quite a stretch.

I also really didn't like how the author started almost every section by saying, I thought X was the weirdest behavior ever, and then I learned that animals did it too, so it seemed less crazy. She's talking about a lot of stigmatized behaviors -- sex, drugs, mental illness. It would be nice if she showed a little more empathy.

Also her theory that yogurt causes bulimia still has me shaking me head.

It's too bad, the book sounded like it was going to be really good when I heard Natterson-Horowitz interviewed on Fresh Air.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Ready Player One

  • By: Ernest Cline
  • Narrated by: Wil Wheaton
  • Length: 15 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 210,350
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 196,389
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 195,978

At once wildly original and stuffed with irresistible nostalgia, Ready Player One is a spectacularly genre-busting, ambitious, and charming debut—part quest novel, part love story, and part virtual space opera set in a universe where spell-slinging mages battle giant Japanese robots, entire planets are inspired by Blade Runner, and flying DeLoreans achieve light speed.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I’m sorry I waited so long to read this book.

  • By Julie W. Capell on 05-27-14

I guess I'm just not that into 80s pop culture

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-13-12

I think, as a 39-year-old nerd, I am the target audience for this book. But I found the story as formulaic as one of the D&D modules it constantly references, and most of the 80's pop culture references just reminded me how sacharine and commercial the 80's were.

2 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Thinking, Fast and Slow

  • By: Daniel Kahneman
  • Narrated by: Patrick Egan
  • Length: 20 hrs and 2 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11,226
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,506
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,419

The guru to the gurus at last shares his knowledge with the rest of us. Nobel laureate Daniel Kahneman's seminal studies in behavioral psychology, behavioral economics, and happiness studies have influenced numerous other authors, including Steven Pinker and Malcolm Gladwell. In Thinking, Fast and Slow, Kahneman at last offers his own, first book for the general public. It is a lucid and enlightening summary of his life's work. It will change the way you think about thinking. Two systems drive the way we think and make choices, Kahneman explains....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Already Purchased Two Copies for Friends

  • By Anthony A. on 07-13-13

Really did drag on

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-13-12

I love books about cognitive science and Kahneman and Tversky are giants in the field. They used thought experiments (followed up by actual experiments) to show how little insight we all have into our decision making processes -- how often we fall back on mental short cuts that give us incorrect answers, and how shockingly unaware we are of the problem. After hearing so many other authors reference their work, I thought it would be great to hear it described first hand, and it was, for the first half of the book, but Kahneman just tried to pack too much stuff in. And each chapter started with examples of how to use their new insights in business situations -- which seemed interesting at first, but got pretty annoying.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Thinking the Twentieth Century

  • By: Tony Judt, Timothy Snyder
  • Narrated by: Ralph Cosham
  • Length: 15 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 71
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 63
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 62

Here is the final book of unparalleled historian Tony Judt. Where Judt’s masterpiece Postwar redefined the history of modern Europe by uniting the stories of its eastern and western halves, Thinking the Twentieth Century unites the century’s conflicted intellectual history into a single soaring narrative. The 20th century comes to life as the age of ideas - a time when, for good or for ill, the thoughts of the few reigned over the lives of the many.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • UNINTELLIGIBLE

  • By Norman on 03-07-12

A fascinating synthesis of recent history

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-13-12

I had never heard of Tony Judt, but this book was a great introduction to his thinking, presented in an accessible style. Because Judt was dying, the book consists of a series of interviews -- so there is no chance for long footnotes or an overly-academic tone. The interview format can get a little confusing because the reader doesn't use different voices for the Snyder and Judt, so it can be hard to figure out what is question and what is anser. Judt had a strong moral compass and although he was certainly left of center, a lot of this book deals with criticism of the Left for their silence on the atrocities of the USSR. Basically a history of the Left in the 20th century that I'd never been exposed to.

5 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • Neuromancer

  • By: William Gibson
  • Narrated by: Robertson Dean
  • Length: 10 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 5,041
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 4,579
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,592

Twenty years ago, it was as if someone turned on a light. The future blazed into existence with each deliberate word that William Gibson laid down. The winner of Hugo, Nebula, and Philip K. Dick Awards, Neuromancer didn't just explode onto the science fiction scene - it permeated into the collective consciousness, culture, science, and technology.Today, there is only one science fiction masterpiece to thank for the term "cyberpunk," for easing the way into the information age and Internet society.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Great book. Terrible performance.

  • By Denis on 04-08-16

I find something new every time I read this book

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-06-12

I've read and re-read Neuromancer about every 10 years since I was a teenager, and I feel like I get something new out of it every time. So, this is one of the few audiobooks I've bought even though I'd already read the book, and it was completely worth it. And Gibson's explanation in the preface of the vexing "The sky above the port was the color of a television tuned to a dead channel" opening line (he's talking about some kind of old-timey television that goes silver when there's no reception) was a revelation. The reader was good. Very laconic, but, for me, that fit the cyber-noire genre.

In the Realm of Hungry Ghosts audiobook cover art
  • In the Realm of Hungry Ghosts

  • Close Encounters with Addiction
  • By: Gabor Maté
  • Narrated by: Daniel Maté
  • Length: 15 hrs and 45 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,051
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 916
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 909

Best-selling writer and physician Gabor Maté looks at the epidemic of addictions in our society, tells us why we are so prone to them, and details what is needed to liberate ourselves. Starting with a close view of his drug-addicted patients, Dr. Maté looks at his own history of compulsive behavior, weaving a story of real people who struggle with addiction with the latest research on addiction and the brain. In a bold synthesis of clinical experience, insight and cutting edge scientific findings, Dr. Maté sheds light on this most puzzling of human frailties.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Great Information

  • By York View on 08-15-11

A powerful voice for humane treatment of drug user

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-05-12

The descriptions of his patients are heart-rending, but powerful in the compassion he brings to his work. I think his scientific ideas -- that relatively mild traumas (like your mom being stressed out) during pregnancy and infancy will give you an addictive personality -- are half-baked at best and basically amount to saying that all of us are prone to addictive or compulsive behaviors. I also found his assertion that addiction did not exist before the Renaissance to be pretty odd. It was disappointing to have someone who is trying to advocate for harm reduction, a policy that is both compassionate and evidence-based, making so fast and loose with the evidence.

5 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • Hallucinations

  • By: Oliver Sacks
  • Narrated by: Dan Woren, Oliver Sacks
  • Length: 9 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 626
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 537
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 530

Have you ever seen something that wasn't really there? Heard someone call your name in an empty house? Sensed someone following you and turned around to find nothing? Hallucinations don't belong wholly to the insane. Much more commonly, they are linked to sensory deprivation, intoxication, illness, or injury. People with migraines may see shimmering arcs of light or tiny, Lilliputian figures of animals and people.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Not Just Hallucinations

  • By Pamela Harvey on 01-05-13

His personal experiences are fascinating

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-05-12

The book is organized more by types of hallucination than by case studies of specific individuals, and it suffers as a result. The case studies are too short and really aren't as engaging and satisfying as those in his earlier books. But hearing Oliver Sacks talk about his drug use in the 60s is pretty amazing. It is a different kind of story about doing drugs -- about a shy, smart young man trying to find some transcendance and joy (which he ultimately finds in writing, not in drugs) not a tell-all memoir about a rock star or celebrity.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful