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  • 133
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  • 97
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  • Time and Time Again

  • By: Ben Elton
  • Narrated by: Jot Davies
  • Length: 13 hrs and 43 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 236
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 226
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 224

It’s the 1st of June 1914 and Hugh Stanton, ex-soldier and celebrated adventurer is quite literally the loneliest man on earth. No one he has ever known or loved has been born yet. Perhaps now they never will be.Stanton knows that a great and terrible war is coming. A collective suicidal madness that will destroy European civilization and bring misery to millions in the century to come. He knows this because, for him, that century is already history.Somehow he must change that history. He must prevent the war.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Don't Mess With Yesterday!

  • By Carole T. on 01-03-15

Wonderful Premise and Payoff

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-10-16

If you could change one moment in time, which would you choose? That's the premise of Time and Time Again. Is there a single moment in time that hurdles the 20th century into unspeakable violence, pollution and vapid consumption? Were we heading for a better future if not for a single event? And if you had the power to change that one event, should you use it?

This novel is a fantastic blend of action, adventure, romance and philosophy. Add a dash of Isaac Newton (because who doesn't yearn for more Isaac Newton). Faultlessly l
paced with twists and turns - some you see coming, and at least one that shakes your foundations to the core.

Beautiful narration be Jot Davies who made even the most wretched of characters wholly human (if not all slightly masculine). The novel's conclusion - perfect to the story but also haunting in such a way that will simply not permit you to easily put this story away.

I am so eager to talk about this book with my frinds, but sadly I will need to wait for them all to finish reading the numerous copies I am purchasing and intend to gift to them all first.

  • Pale Horse

  • Project Eden Thriller, Book 3
  • By: Brett Battles
  • Narrated by: MacLeod Andrews
  • Length: 7 hrs and 36 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 555
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 502
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 503

A simple push of a button and the world will never be the same. Martina Gable returns home from college to spend Christmas break with her family, but the relaxing vacation she expects is not even close to what she'll get. Sanjay, a young man in Mumbai who knows more than he should about Project Eden’s plan, will do whatever he can to keep Kusum, the girl he loves, alive and safe. boy named Brandon Ash runs for his life in the hills of Montana, wanting only to see his family again. But first there is Daniel....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Pale Horse is Project Eden Book 3

  • By Wayne on 09-01-15

Best to binge on all 7 books at once

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-04-16

Yes - ends on a cliffhanger. But exceptional storytelling throughout! If you love end-of-the-world, plague, conspiracy, disaster, good-vs-evil stories and you want a long, multi-faceted, character-filled thrillers - get all 7 books and have a ball!

Fantastic narration. MacLeod Andrews is exceptional with accents - esp. Sanjay and the India plot-line. Great pacing by Brett Battles. I listened to all of Pale Horse in a single day, getting very little else done and staying up until the wee-hours of the am to finish it. Started Ashes (Book 4) the following morning.

  • Life as We Knew It

  • A Novel
  • By: Susan Beth Pfeffer
  • Narrated by: Emily Bauer
  • Length: 8 hrs and 59 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 841
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 686
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 681

Miranda's disbelief turns to fear in a split second when a meteor knocks the Moon closer to the Earth. How should her family prepare for the future when worldwide tsunamis wipe out the coasts, earthquakes rock the continents, and volcanic ash blocks out the sun?

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • A very G-rated apocalyptic tale

  • By Pennalie on 04-05-16

A very G-rated apocalyptic tale

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-05-16

Hunger Games this is not. It is far more family-friendly is every way. That was my reason for picking this book - and if you have kids ages 9-14 and a long road trip, this may be a good pick for your family too - sure to lead to some interesting conversations.

But for the adults in the car BEWARE. The teen narrator will grate on your last nerve. For a good portion of the book I blamed the narrator - Emily Bauer - for the childish, whiny protagonist. But a bit more than halfway though, I realized that it was not how the words were read that was the problem - its the words themselves. The protagonist is supposedly 16 years old, but she sounds very much like she is 12. Her focus throughout the story (until the last 2 hours) is so vapid, whiny and self-obsessed that I had a hard time cheering for her survival. Oh how much better it could have been if the author had decided to give our young heroine some maturity, spunk, and/or intelligence from the get-go.

As far as end of the world survival - the family relies on a coincidence of good fortune that removes them from the true life or death struggle that the story attempts to portray. Apparently in this part of Pennsylvania looters and bandits do not exist, so the breakdown of civilization is downright Norman-Rockwellian. That being said, the author does an good job building on the tension of isolation and the claustrophobia that would grow as communication with the outside world is severed.

All in all - a very G-rated apocalyptic tale.

8 of 8 people found this review helpful

  • Annihilation

  • Southern Reach Trilogy, Book 1
  • By: Jeff VanderMeer
  • Narrated by: Carolyn McCormick
  • Length: 6 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 4,873
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 4,507
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 4,508

Area X has been cut off from the rest of the continent for decades. Nature has reclaimed the last vestiges of human civilization. The first expedition returned with reports of a pristine, Edenic landscape; all the members of the second expedition committed suicide; the third expedition died in a hail of gunfire as its members turned on one another; the members of the eleventh expedition returned as shadows of their former selves, and within months of their return, all had died of aggressive cancer.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Great story, bad narrator

  • By Julian P. on 01-26-16

Tough Listen with No Pay-Off

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-18-16

I wanted to want this book more. It took weeks for me to finish it - because the story is so . . . . odd. Perhaps in print I could have better made sense of Area X - but as an audio experience, I could never fully grasp much of anything. I felt only that I (living vicariously through "The Biologist") was swallowed up by a never-fully-revealed organism. The long passages of clinical description were only interrupted by recollections of an unhappy marriage. These recollections became more and more intrusive as the plot continued.

In the last hour, I finally felt like I there might be hope that the story would take me somewhere, that The Biologist might actually do something other than observe, that her motivation might move her to strive for a conclusion. Then - repeatedly - The Biologist tells us that she (and by extension we) will never understand this place, her experiences - or basically anything we have spent the last several hours exploring. Really?? After all this, the author has chosen not to fully reveal this strange world or its mysteries. Why else were we invited into this story if not to at least make sense of it in some way?

It felt very much like a cheat. And in the end I found the story to be an utter waste of time.

23 of 28 people found this review helpful

  • The Inner Circle

  • By: Brad Meltzer
  • Narrated by: Scott Brick
  • Length: 14 hrs and 10 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 4,743
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,863
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 3,854

When Clementine Kaye, archivist Beecher White's first childhood crush, shows up at the National Archives asking for his help, Beecher tries to impress her by showing her the secret vault where the president of the United States privately reviews classified documents. They accidentally happen upon a priceless artifact - and find themselves suddenly entangled in a web of deception, conspiracy, and murder.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Captivating

  • By FAC on 12-29-11

Frustrating Protagonist

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-11-15

I wanted so much to lose myself in the National Archives with a presidential mystery going back 200+ years, but instead I was utterly distracted by the whiny so-called hero of the story who is emotionally frozen as the zit-faced nerd he once was in high school. I could not get past his childishness, his puppy love, his paralyzing self-doubt or his failure to think things through. He is supposed to be smart, and yet he came across as a 14-year old boy trapped in a man's body.

For 2/3 of the book, the mystery kept me interested, until the author deliberately erased fundamental plot lines in order to "surprise" the reader at the end. The finale,set in an underground labyrinth filled with blind alleys going no where turned out to be the perfect metaphor for this story.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Flanagan’s Run

  • By: Tom McNab
  • Narrated by: Rupert Degas
  • Length: 16 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 184
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 150
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 154

During the Depression the ebullient American entrepreneur Charles Flanagan assembles 2,000 runners from all corners of the earth, to run from Los Angeles to New York for prize-money of $150,000. Flanagan’s Trans-America runners face 3,000 miles, across the Mojave desert and the frozen Rockies, running a daily average of 50 miles for three months.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Loved it

  • By Tracy on 04-20-12

Absolutely Delightful in Every Way

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-03-15

On your marks, get set, go! And I was off and running for 16 wonderful hours. How is it possible that this book is so unknown. It was utterly charming, compelling, riveting, suspenseful, uplifting . . . . I could go on and on. I adored the characters - with a special love for the enduring Doc Cole and the unapologetic Charles Flanagan, and the ever feisty Kate Sheridan. The weaving through of historical figures of the 1930s - like Al Capone and J. Edgar Hoover gave this book a E. L. Doctorow feel, combined with Steinbeck-ian prose and P.T. Barnum hoopla.

A full review is not complete without RAVES for the narrator - Rupert Degas. This band of merry travelers, diverse and multi-cultural, was performed masterfully by a single man, doing justice to each character's unique personality. Even singing Scottish folk songs as the story unfolded. Bravo!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Girl on the Train

  • A Novel
  • By: Paula Hawkins
  • Narrated by: Clare Corbett, Louise Brealey, India Fisher
  • Length: 10 hrs and 58 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 133,997
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 118,356
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 118,235

Audie Award, Audiobook of the Year, 2016. Rachel takes the same commuter train every morning. Every day she rattles down the track, flashes past a stretch of cozy suburban homes, and stops at the signal that allows her to daily watch the same couple breakfasting on their deck. She’s even started to feel like she knows them. "Jess and Jason," she calls them. Their life—as she sees it—is perfect. Not unlike the life she recently lost. And then she sees something shocking. It’s only a minute until the train moves on, but it’s enough. Now everything’s changed. Unable to keep it to herself, Rachel offers what she knows to the police, and becomes inextricably entwined in what happens next, as well as in the lives of everyone involved. Has she done more harm than good? Compulsively readable, The Girl on the Train is an emotionally immersive, Hitchcockian thriller and an electrifying debut.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • The Girl on The Train

  • By BookReader on 12-30-15

Complex and Compelling

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-12-15

What a lovely narrator! Her pacing added a new layer of complexity to this story. Combining flawed and terribly unreliable narrators with a sense of doom and urgency - everything about this story was compelling . . . . Well, everything except (possible SPOILER) the actual reveal at the end. I was a bit deflated when we finally got there. I suppose it was because every character up until that point was so wonderfully complex, and I was hoping for a more textured, layered ending. That one flaw would not stop me from recommending this book, or looking for additional titles by the author or narrator. But it does prevent me from giving the story 5 stars.

  • The Fold

  • By: Peter Clines
  • Narrated by: Ray Porter
  • Length: 10 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 31,944
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 29,827
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 29,777

The folks in Mike Erikson's small New England town would say he's just your average, everyday guy. And that's exactly how Mike likes it. Sure, the life he's chosen isn't much of a challenge to someone with his unique gifts, but he's content with his quiet and peaceful existence. That is, until an old friend presents him with an irresistible mystery, one that Mike is uniquely qualified to solve.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Had so much promise

  • By Brian G on 09-01-17

Its Not 14, but Not Bad

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-12-15

I read some rave reviews before ordering the Fold - and after listening to 14 about 1 year ago, I was eager to return to the story and narrator that made me fall in love with Audiobooks in general. But this is not 14. It began well (if not predictably) . . . but ended with a thud.

First we meet Mike - likable ordinary school teacher who is also, perhaps, the smartest man in the world. I did like Mike (as I was clearly supposed to). He was identifiable, self-effacing . . . likable. Yep - taht about sums him up. Oh, and he has an eidetic memory.

Then we meet a room full of fantastically unlikable scientists. And they only get worse as the story goes on and we see how their selfish, self-obsessed, obtuse arrogance has fractured reality.

Then we meet the Albuquerque Door. The premise of this device delights me whenever it is used throughout sci-fi lit, TV, movies, etc. Yes, this devise (or one like it) is used quite often (just Google "Parallel universe fiction"), but that's because it gives the author literally limitless worlds in which it play. So great - I'm in! The paradoxes it creates are very interesting. I'm hooked.

Up until this point, I'm enjoying this story (character flaws and all) because both the author and the narrator are doing their job quite well.

Finally we get to the monsters - and suddenly everything story was creating is over. A whole new monster story now unfolds. And defeating the monsters has nothing to do with skill-set of our characters. The ultimate battle at the finale of the book was not so much clever as it was convenient. It was as though the author did not quite know how to end the story, so he just called in the army.

Thud.

1 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • The Girl with All the Gifts

  • By: M. R. Carey
  • Narrated by: Finty Williams
  • Length: 13 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 35,098
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 32,432
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 32,435

Melanie is a very special girl. Dr Caldwell calls her "our little genius". Every morning, Melanie waits in her cell to be collected for class. When they come for her, Sergeant keeps his gun pointing at her while two of his people strap her into the wheelchair. She thinks they don't like her. She jokes that she won't bite, but they don't laugh. Melanie loves school. She loves learning about spelling and sums and the world outside the classroom and the children's cells. She tells her favorite teacher all the things she'll do when she grows up. Melanie doesn't know why this makes Miss Justineau look sad.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Hours in, restarted so husband could listen too!

  • By Pikay on 12-13-14

Literary Zombie Fiction - who knew?

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-12-15

Exquisitely written zombie story. I know - literary zombie fiction is not your usual cross-over. But I adored the author's choices for this story - her narration style, her characters' points of view, the physical and emotional journeys of each person. It is beautifully written and narrated, and it is utterly heartbreaking. There is gore (yup-at its core this is a zombie story), but there is also poignancy, friendship, love, sacrifice . . . all leading up to a finale that is both deeply disturbing and also satisfying. When I got to the final page, I physically cringed, while at the same time realizing that - YES - this is exactly how the book had to end. I felt the author take me right to the cliff and make me realize I had no choice but to jump.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Until the End of the World

  • By: Sarah Lyons Fleming
  • Narrated by: Julia Whelan
  • Length: 13 hrs and 14 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,461
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,193
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,178

Cassie Forrest isn't surprised to learn that the day she’s decided to get her life together is also the day the world ends. After all, she’s been on a self-imposed losing streak since her survivalist parents died: she’s stopped painting, broken off her engagement to Adrian and dated a real jerk. Rectifying her mistakes has to wait, however, because Cassie and her friends have just enough time to escape Brooklyn for her parents’ cabin before Bornavirus LX turns them into zombies, too.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • ✫✫ 5 Stars ✫✫

  • By Cyndi Marie on 05-16-19

Zombie Chick Lit - Who Knew?

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-28-15

I suppose I should have been prepared - I read the reviews, that this story was not for the zombie purist (which I am not), but I was wholly unprepared for how vapid and childish these characters would be. In other reviews, I see this compared to YA - but it would be insulting to Hunger Games/Insurgent/Twilight to put this in their category, The characters are all over 21, some over 30, but they behave like self-obsessed high-schoolers.

The story was far more about pining over lost boyfriends than it was about the Zombie Apocalypse. When one of the main characters has her major breakthrough of the plot-line by cutting her hair in the triumph of female empowerment, I actually said, out loud - "SERIOUSLY???" Even the usually stellar narration by Julia Whelan was not enough to salvage the story.

The story begins with a cast filled with every cliche imaginable - a long lost love, a whiny rich boy, a spoiled rich girl, a forgettable best friend, a token gay boy who reads more like a neutered pup than a real person, and a heroine who is filled with Bridget-Jones-like insecurity. Next, bring on the Zombie Apocalypse, by which we actually mean Road Trip! Arrive at a perfectly stocked farm with every advantage, where characters pick up a gun for the first time only to discover that have perfect aim. Nearly half the book goes by as a house full of twenty-somethings make eyes at each other while learning to can tomatoes. When the zombies do arrive, in five-minute blips here and there, they are completely separate from the plot. If you removed them from the story, very little would actually change. The stakes are never very high for the characters, and the reader (listener) knows it.

Suffice to say, it was utterly disappointing.

4 of 6 people found this review helpful