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  • 13
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  • The Making of the Atomic Bomb

  • 25th Anniversary Edition
  • By: Richard Rhodes
  • Narrated by: Holter Graham
  • Length: 37 hrs and 16 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,784
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,655
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,647

Here for the first time, in rich human, political, and scientific detail, is the complete story of how the bomb was developed, from the turn-of-the-century discovery of the vast energy locked inside the atom to the dropping of the first bombs on Japan. Few great discoveries have evolved so swiftly - or have been so misunderstood. From the theoretical discussions of nuclear energy to the bright glare of Trinity, there was a span of hardly more than 25 years.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Wow... Grade A+ ... Exceptional.

  • By Amazon Customer on 03-15-16

A brilliant author is drowned by its narrator.

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-29-17

This book wasn’t for you, but who do you think might enjoy it more?

Richard Rhodes' "A Dark Sun: The Making of the Hydrogen Bomb" I rank up there with Bill Bryson's "A Short History of Nearly Everything". Both authors reading their own material - an intimacy with their knowledge carves such authentic presence into their narrative that it becomes transparent, effortless and all you want is more.

Has The Making of the Atomic Bomb turned you off from other books in this genre?

Unlistenable after experiencing the author's own reading of "A Dark Sun".

How did the narrator detract from the book?

The book is drowned in a hyperbolically emphatic staccato of a voice see-sawing like a bee buzz dive-bombing through every sentence. Great science lost to over presentation. Please be a leaf on the river and not boulder in the middle of it.

Any additional comments?

Listen to a sample of A Dark Sun. Feel the difference. It is sad for us to lose this book. Same as with "A Winters Tale", a book I'd read and loved deeply but the narrator made it torture.

7 of 7 people found this review helpful

  • The Greatest Story Ever Told - So Far

  • Why Are We Here?
  • By: Lawrence M. Krauss
  • Narrated by: Lawrence Krauss
  • Length: 10 hrs and 25 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,540
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,402
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,395

Internationally renowned, award-winning theoretical physicist, New York Times bestselling author of A Universe from Nothing, and passionate advocate for reason, Lawrence Krauss tells the dramatic story of the discovery of the hidden world of reality - a grand poetic vision of nature - and how we find our place within it.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Wonderful read/listen.

  • By Albert Sjoberg (PA) on 04-04-17

Painful

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-29-17

How could a topic so beautiful become so painful from the moment the narrator speaks? I went into anxiety quickly as I had to listen to bible comparisons and endless empty slow generalizations - if you're looking for gripping visionary content it's not here.

18 of 26 people found this review helpful

  • A Short History of Nearly Everything

  • By: Bill Bryson
  • Narrated by: Bill Bryson
  • Length: 5 hrs and 48 mins
  • Abridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 420
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 362
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 358

A Short History of Nearly Everything is Bill Bryson’s quest to find out everything that has happened from the Big Bang to the rise of civilization - how we got from there, being nothing at all, to here, being us. His challenge is to take subjects that normally bore the pants off most of us and see if there isn't some way to render them comprehensible to people who have never thought they could be interested in science. It's not so much about what we know, as about how we know what we know.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Abridged!

  • By David Steenburg on 07-23-17

Fun Detailed and Ironic

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-05-16

Get all of time with no stone unturned, or connection missed, all time in all its contrasts, ironies, and paradigms. The facts come as surprises as a smooth narrative plays with the truth blowing in the winds of change and chance.