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salamander

Ohio, USA
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These are really helpful for me at work.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-08-19

I love using these quick guides to take a moment to pause in my day and stay fresh in my mind and my intentions esp. at work. I struggle to meditate without guidance, so these move-with are really helpful. I also like their yoga apps for the same reason.

Very good--esp. well read by Stephen Fry

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-16-12

Where does Montmorency rank among all the audiobooks you???ve listened to so far?

I liked the story quite well--it's a little short, however, and I tend to like big long books. Moreover, I thought the ending a little too easy. However, I love Stephen Fry--could listen to him all day.

The coming of age of a rising public intellectual

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-26-11

What made the experience of listening to The Beautiful Struggle the most enjoyable?

Ta-Nehisi Coates blogs for the Atlantic Monthly. I'd been reading his blog for quite awhile when it occured to me that this book might be available on audible. It's an excellent introduction to Ta-Nehisi's life and world-view, particularly the role played by his father, Paul Coates, of Black Classic Press. Read his blog--he's a rising public intellectual and just very wise on many fronts. Additionally, JD Jackson captures the voice I hear when I read Ta-Nehisi's blog, and taught me to correctly pronounce his name (Ta-neh-HA-si), which I'd been mispronouncing for a long time.

32 of 35 people found this review helpful

Sort of like AS Byatt's Possession,

Overall
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-01-10

This book pleasantly reminded me of A.S. Byatt's Possession, which I loved (and you should go get, if you haven't read it yet.) Like Byatt's book, this book plays on a literary mystery, bringing together the mystery of the mutiny on the bounty with the life of William Wordsworth and a modern-day search for documents that could make or break careers, and be worth a small fortune to the owners. I am an English professor (of American literature, however), so I love this stuff, if it's done well, and this one is.

Sometimes detective fiction seems to approach non-straight characters almost with tongs and a crinkled nose, so I especially like about this book is that gay and lesbian characters are included as a matter of course (although the central character is straight), and they are fully human.

Finally, I don't know where the other reviewer got the idea that this is Christian fiction (must have been a mis-characterization based on the name Christian Fletcher). Obviously, this is not a "Christian" text, thank heavens, and the language is suited to the areas that the people are coming from and the lives they are leading.

(And I suspect Christ hung out with a lot of people whose language was deemed crude--ironically, in fact, St. Augustine rejected Christianity for a long time simply because the Gospels were written in such a crude, street language, not the Classical Greek he was trained to respect. End of sermon!)

14 of 14 people found this review helpful