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Karen Caton

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  • The First Fifteen Lives of Harry August

  • By: Claire North
  • Narrated by: Peter Kenny
  • Length: 12 hrs and 10 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,833
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,340
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,340

No matter what he does or the decisions he makes, when death comes, Harry always returns to where he began, a child with all the knowledge of a life he has already lived a dozen times before. Nothing ever changes. Until now.As Harry nears the end of his 11th life, a little girl appears at his bedside. "I nearly missed you, Doctor August," she says. "I need to send a message." This is the story of what Harry does next, and what he did before, and how he tries to save a past he cannot change and a future he cannot allow.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • An unexpected treasure

  • By Stefanie on 08-24-15

Can I give it 3.5 Stars?

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-27-17

Would you say that listening to this book was time well-spent? Why or why not?

I am a sucker for both time travel and replayed life stories. Not the Scottish romance in time variety, but this Groundhog Day concept fascinates me. I try to read them all. I enjoyed this book on this level, and appreciated the wrinkle of the premise... that we all relive our lives again and again, but that through an evolutionary or other cause, most now forget those past experiences, while a few remember them... and thus become the guardians of the planet in a way. They have a chance, through the repeats, to correct wrongs. Of course, villains also emerge who would use the repeat opportunities for their own personal gain or to amass power.

I liked the premise, and for the most part the execution, but I found the book a little tedious and repetitive in places. That, coupled with the lack of variation in voices, actually forced me to go back and repeat several chapters of the book to be sure I was following the story. Some questions went unanswered, some lines were less than satisfactory, but it was a nice addition to the body of this genre, overall.

25 of 29 people found this review helpful

  • A Man Called Ove

  • By: Fredrik Backman
  • Narrated by: George Newbern
  • Length: 9 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 63,072
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 57,707
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 57,604

Meet Ove. He's a curmudgeon - the kind of man who points at people he dislikes as if they were burglars caught outside his bedroom window. He has staunch principles, strict routines, and a short fuse. People call him "the bitter neighbor from hell". But behind the cranky exterior there is a story and a sadness.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I Laughed and I Cried

  • By Bill on 08-22-15

One of my favorite books fo the Year

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-27-17

What made the experience of listening to A Man Called Ove the most enjoyable?

We are all framed by our life experiences, but there is a core -- our nature -- that those life experiences shape. Ove was by nature a man who was comfortable with black and white guidelines for living. One might say he was rigid to a fault, critical of those who did not see the world in the same way or respect the same rules. One might say he came across as cold, lacking compassion for others. And yet, behind the deadpan façade was a man who loved -- when he allowed himself to do -- and loved deeply. The affection of others can melt hearts. The story of Ove reminds us of the impact that we each can have on the ol' curmudgeons of the world, and it reminds us that there is much behind the façade.

  • The Autobiography of Andrew Carnegie

  • By: Andrew Carnegie
  • Narrated by: Antony Ferguson
  • Length: 11 hrs and 36 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 361
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 302
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 304

Andrew Carnegie was an immigrant, a poor boy who worked in a cotton mill, a man who amassed a great fortune as a steel baron and then became one of the most generous and influential philanthropists the world has ever known. His famous dictum, that he who dies rich dies disgraced, has inspired philanthropists and philanthropic enterprises for generations. During his own lifetime, he put his ideas into action by creating a family of organizations that continue to work toward improving the human condition.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • The narration ruined it!!

  • By Sami on 11-14-13

Abrupt Ending...

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-27-17

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

YES! I was fascinated by his story, how he climbed the ladder, his foresight, his humility, his work ethic, his praise for those who influenced him... it was inspirational as well as informative. I had never really pieced together how he truly was a forerunner in the arena of philanthropy, and how he gave away such a huge percentage of his fortune. He found ways to give that were novel and thoughtful. This is what capitalist spirit should look like. Today there is a movement among billionaires to follow this philanthropic spirit, and I would assume that Carnegie is the inspiration. The story itself rates a 4-star, but the narration and choppy style (I don't think he actually finished the book) make this 3-star overall... but I would recommend it to anyone interested in the historical overview of the era.

What do you think the narrator could have done better?

Using a Scottish accent was a good idea, but I doubt that Andrew's brogue was this thick. It was a little too much.