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Melissa and Josh

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  • The Trackers Series Box Set

  • The Trackers Series, Books 1-4
  • By: Nicholas Sansbury Smith
  • Narrated by: Bronson Pinchot
  • Length: 33 hrs and 54 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 13
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12

Ripped from the headlines, the explosive Trackers saga is a realistic depiction of what an EMP attack and the aftermath might look like from one of the genre's leading voices, USA Today best-selling author and former Homeland Security Disaster Mitigation Officer, Nicholas Sansbury Smith. This box set includes the entire four-book Trackers series with over 30 hours of postapocalyptic survival fiction and action. Box set includes Trackers, Trackers 2: The Hunted, Trackers 3: The Storm, and Trackers 4: The Damned.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Dark. Intense. Savage.

  • By Ripcord on 10-16-18

Terrifyingly Surreal

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-21-18

- Josh here

As the proud owner of physical paperback copies of this series, along with the original individual audiobooks, I had to purchase the box set. Nick has a way with words that can only be described as magical. The terrifyingly believable reality that this series paints for the reader is beyond surreal. And I make that last comment after also having watched "The Day After" from the 80s. This was the first movie that came to mind when I first read book one so long ago.

The characters are very well written and the storyline flows in a very easy to follow manner. As I've said in my reviews of Nick's other works, he has a wonderful way of portraying what I have come to refer to as "the human condition". How does one behave in a style of life they are not accustomed to? When the rules that once gave society order, that kept things structured, are no longer, what will each member do to contribute to society or newly developed mob/gang rule? The Trackers series delves into each of these areas and takes you through what goes on in the minds of people left in the aftermath of something as horrifying as an EMP attack.

This is a fantastic listen and Bronson did a great job with the emotions invoked throughout the story. I recommend this series to anyone who is looking for a realistic post-apocalyptic series. 5/5

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Infected: Jim's First Day

  • By: Joseph Zuko
  • Narrated by: Steve Rausch
  • Length: 5 hrs and 56 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 52
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 50
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 50

On a day like any other, Jim Blackmore finds himself at ground zero of the zombie apocalypse. He's forced to run a blood-soaked gauntlet through a city overrun by an insurmountable horde of the dead in a desperate attempt to reach his wife and two small children.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • HERE'S TO JIM, AND WISHING HIM MANY MORE DAYS!

  • By Tracy P. on 06-15-18

A Great Zombie Story Here!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-18-18

So, my husband is always purchasing audiobooks and his list was growing and growing. Unfortunately, my audiobook list was nil. After perusing his list, I came across this story. Who doesn’t love anything zombie related? I mean seriously! Needless to say, this was a fast-paced, entertaining zombie story. Please tell there will be a part 2?!

My biggest issue with this story was the repetition when it came to certain scenes. By repetition, I mean the author used certain words…repeatedly. When a word is used multiple times in a small area (as the examples below show), it stands out to me like a sore thumb.

For example:
“Slide down next to me, I signal to Evan (was it Evan or Devin?). Frank and Sarah help him move slowly down to me. I help prop him up next to me.”

Or this one:
“Evan lifts up the door. A set of busted up arms reaches under the door and grabs Evan by the shins. He squeals and let’s go of the door. It crashes down on the arms. Another set of fingers reaches under the door. They lift up the door, and it comes to a stop at the wrench.”

Regarding the above example, it also shows redundancy as well as repetition. Redundancy is when you use two or more words (usually two words meaning the same thing). In this case, it’s “lifts” and “up.” Both words basically mean up, so there was no reason to include the “up” part. “Evan lifts the door.” Just saying.

On a side note, I didn’t know that this was the author’s first book, so kudos for writing as well as you did, overall! To me, it’s usually pretty obvious when it’s an author’s first book, but not so in this case.

I was a big fan of Frank. For an older guy, he was definitely bad-ass! I also liked the little backstories that Jim provided.

The narrator did a good job. This was the first book I’ve heard him read and I’d definitely be interested in hearing more from him. He provided a variety of voices, so it was easy to tell which character was speaking, and he had that natural talking-voice that I feel should be required when narrating.

Questions/Comments:

I couldn’t help but notice how long it seemed to take the dead sporting goods employees to come back to life when for everyone else it seemed to be pretty much within seconds of death.

I forgot the lady’s name, but she ended up joining the Jim and the gang for a bit before she ended up changing into a zombie herself. Now…neither her nor her husband owned a car. 1. When did her husband get bitten by a zombie? 2. Where did her husband get the car he crashed in? 3. How did she not know something was going on—zombies?

Jim ends up injuring his calf after he falls out the farmhouse window. For whatever reason, his calf is only mentioned that first time; afterward, everyone refers to it as his ankle. Strange. Anyways,

Jim has a sore…leg that ended up needing stitches and obviously hurts since he has mentioned it hurting, being sore, multiple times. So…why does he think it a good idea to kick the apartment door down? That just seemed stupid to me.

Lastly, when climbing up to Jim’s neighbor’s apartment, why in the world did everyone leave Evan for last? I mean, he’s the most injured!

In the end, this was a good story, and I hope the author writes more.

  • Mavericks

  • Expeditionary Force, Book 6
  • By: Craig Alanson
  • Narrated by: R. C. Bray
  • Length: 17 hrs and 21 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,221
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 6,846
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,826

The remnants of the Expeditionary Force stranded on the alien-controlled planet "Paradise" get a chance to prove themselves, in a simple off-world training mission with a ship full of teenage alien cadets. When the mission goes horribly wrong and the survival of everyone on Paradise is at risk, the Merry Band of Pirates may have to come to the rescue. Unless they get killed first.... 

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Trouble on Paradise pt. II

  • By Kurtis Karr on 09-27-18

Winner, Winner, Chicken Dinner!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-18-18

Josh here

What is there that I can say about this series that hasn't been said up until this point? This is easily in my top three favorite space operas and Craig still manages to surprise me with the level of detail he goes into with developing the story. Skippy, Gunny, COL Joe, Chotek, Major Smythe, every one of the Merry Band of Pirates brings me great joy with every tale I get to listen to from this wonderful series.

I am going to keep this review short but just know that if you've made it this far in the series, and hopefully you are enjoying the narrated version performed by R.C. Bray, you are in for a continued treat with this one. Irnt was easily my favorite Jeraptha and we got to experience a lot more Nert goodness with this entry.

An easy 5/5.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Roping His Heart

  • Destined for Love: Mansions
  • By: Jaclyn Hardy
  • Narrated by: Sara K. Sheckells
  • Length: 3 hrs and 24 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 4
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 4

The old mansion down the road from Rachel's ranch has always been her escape. No one has lived there for years, and she dreams of owning it herself someday. So when she finds a handsome city guy walking around inside who claims to own the home, her world turns upside down. Patrick's career is just taking off in the city, and he couldn't be happier. The news of his father's passing brings a silver lining when he finds that he's left with a large mansion in a small ranching town—the perfect place to expand his business. But when Patrick meets the beautiful and fiery Rachel at the mansion, he begins to wonder if he made the right choice. Now he must decide if his business is worth going home to, or if he's willing to leave his city life for the woman who has roped his heart.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The city boy finds love with the country girl

  • By Darcie on 10-20-18

It was okay.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-17-18

This was an okay story. It was fast past, and I loved the idea of the abandoned mansion. Throughout the story, I was waiting for some big issue to pop up (a conflict of some kind), but that never happened.

I wasn’t really a fan of Rachel that much. Instead of telling Patrick that she’d been interested in buying his mansion, she only tells him that she doesn’t like his renovation ideas. When she invites him to stay over at her parents’ farmhouse, she basically forces him to help with chores around the farm, knowing that he more than likely, he doesn’t have the right attire for manual labor. I mean she could have simply talked to him about her issues but chose not to. There just seemed to be a lot of times when she was bitchy towards him and he, unfortunately, was totally clueless as to why she was upset with him.

The narrator did an awesome job! I always love coming across narrators that can do a really good male and female voice, no matter what the narrator is. She is definitely one of those kinds of narrators. I’d love to listen to more audiobooks by her.

Questions/Comments:

Am I the only one that wasn’t surprised (at all) that Patrick’s company didn’t want to move to Rachel’s the-middle-of-nowhere town? I mean seriously. Having so many people pick up with their families and move to an area so far from their original office in the city, yeah, that sounds like a great idea.

Why did they keep saying they were going to renovate the house into a hotel instead of a B&B? I mean there is a big difference between the two, and I doubt anyone would build a hotel in that sort of area anyway.

Was anyone else under the impression that Rachel’s “mama” would struggle without her? I mean, Rachel’s mom seemed to rely on her a lot throughout the story. What would she do without Rachel being around? No wonder she didn’t really want Rachel to buy the mansion.

I’m not really sure what Patrick saw in Rachel. It’s like he fell in love with her after she did her performance on stage. Yeah, they had their little moments here and there…I don’t know, I just wasn’t feeling it.

  • The Vampire's Mail Order Bride

  • Nocturne Falls, Book 1
  • By: Kristen Painter
  • Narrated by: B.J. Harrison
  • Length: 8 hrs and 47 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 3,317
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,045
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 3,039

After seeing her maybe-mobster boss murder a guy, Delaney James assumes a new identity and pretends to be a mail order bride. She finds her groom-to-be living in a town that celebrates Halloween every day. Weird. But not as weird as what she doesn't know. Her groom-to-be is a 400-year-old vampire.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Loved It!....... It was Clean, Funny, and Sweet!

  • By Cheri on 02-11-16

This was a cute story!

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-12-18

Where to start…

I liked this story overall. My biggest issue was regarding the supernatural aspect of the story. While Hugh, his family, and the majority of the town were supernatural creatures, not much was really mentioned about them in the story. For example, there’s the part when Hugh has to prove to Delany that he is a vampire. He shows her his fangs—he could have bought those at a store, is her response. What can he do than to convince her of what he is? Well…he grabs her up and races through the woods. I don’t know about anyone else, but I was really curious what he was going to do. Running really fast was probably the last characteristic of a vampire that would have ever popped into my head. Needless to say, that part was pretty disappointing.

Another example, what did being a vampire exactly entail? For Hugh, he was still able to eat and drink regular food, he had a reflection, he could run fast, and he had super hearing (although that only comes up near the end when he comments about Delaney’s heart rate increasing). I assume he had super-human strength, but that wasn’t really talked about (yes, he beat some guys up but still…) He didn’t seem to have any sort of mind control (strange, since I thought that was always one of the main talents a vampire possessed). He couldn’t hover, fly, change into another creature, blend in with his surroundings. Again, I don’t know about anyone else, but Hugh’s vampire persona fell kinda flat for me.

Another issue I had with the story involved the two main characters meeting, falling in love, AND getting married in less than two weeks. I’m not a fan of the fast love stuff like that because it’s not believable.

Anyways, as I said before, I liked this story. It was a fast listen to (audiobook) and was pretty entertaining. I liked the characters, especially Hugh’s servant whose names I’ve forgotten.
Moving on to the narrator. He did a great job! This was the first audiobook I’ve listened to with his narrating it. He has a great speaking voice. I couldn’t tell if he was English or American…or something else. It was unique sounding to my ears. While there were a few areas throughout the story where he pronounced a word exactly as it’s spelled, he has an easy-going way of speaking so that it doesn’t come across as though he’s reading from a script. One area that I was questioning about was regarding his tone. Throughout the story, I felt like he was trying to sound sexy, no matter what was going on in the story. Maybe it’s because he has a naturally soft-sounding voice, I don’t know. Either way, I’m a fan.

Questions/Comments:

I loved Delaney’s cat, Captain. Even though he had a minor roll in the story, when characters described him, for example as “a small cow,” it usually made me smile. One area and I could be wrong, but I swear when Delaney first talks about Captain’s weight, she says that he weighs twenty-six pounds, but then, later on, she changes it to twenty-seven pounds.

How did Hugh (being really old) know what “grab a slice” meant, yet wasn’t too sure when Delaney talked to him about friends with benefits?

Lastly, how did the bad guys know Delaney was in GA?

  • Teach Me to Love

  • Brothers of Belle Fourche, Book 1
  • By: Kari Trumbo
  • Narrated by: J. Scott Bennett
  • Length: 3 hrs and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 15
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 15
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 15

When her husband dies, she has a choice to make: Go home, and face the family who made her stay with the beast, or head to Belle Fourche to the only friend she has left. Conrad Oleson can't read, and it's shamed him for longer than he can remember. When another teacher shows up on his front step, he's sure his brother is meddling, again. But when Izzy reveals her painful past, he can't stay away. And if learning to read brings him closer to her, he'll do about anything for her including teaching her how to love.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great Book

  • By Ashley Hedden on 10-19-18

Loved!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-09-18

Anything in the historical romance genre, I swear I end up loving! If J. Scott Bennett is narrating, it’s even better!

This was a nice listen-to. The characters were likable, minus the bad guys, and there was that happy ending. There wasn’t anything really surprising or shocking that took place, yet it was a fast, sweet story. Although, with me not always paying attention to what number a book holds in a series, I was actually surprised this was book one. I could see the author going back and writing a story (prequel) about how Izzy’s best friend and her husband ended together.

As always, the narrator did an awesome job! I’m a big fan of Mr. Bennett!

I’m definitely interested in reading or listening to more in this series.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • A Witch's Journey

  • The Lobster Cove Series
  • By: Tena Stetler
  • Narrated by: Kate Tyler
  • Length: 9 hrs and 47 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 29
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 29
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 29

Pepper McKay comes from a long line of powerful witches. Unfortunately, magic brings her nothing but trouble. She learned the love of wildlife rescue and rehab from her Aunt Ashling. After graduating from college, Pepper works for Salem Wildlife Sanctuary and lives from paycheck to paycheck, until she inherits the McKay property in Lobster Cove. With the family land and resources, she dares to dream of starting her own wildlife rescue and rehabilitation center.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A very enjoyable listen. Great Narrator

  • By Jason on 03-31-18

It was okay.

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-01-18

I reviewed a free copy of this book from the publisher for an honest review. I was drawn to this one because it was about supernatural-related characters (witches, werewolves, etc.).

On that note, the werewolf side of the story seemed like it was an afterthought. I got that Lathan had issues relating to his military career and bad stuff went on there which, in turn, caused him to feel he was unable to shift into his wolf form. That was understandable. It's just that he never talked to his wolf. That's always been a common aspect of being a werewolf. The characters would always just randomly, mentally talk to their wolves. Lathan didn't do that which seemed strange.

While this was a cute story, I felt like it was missing the drama, conflict, and "OMG" type of moments. We know that the bad guy is after the witch family's magic, at the end he shows up and basically, that situation fizzles out on its own. There was no real confrontation. We know that Kate doesn't like Pepper because Lathan chose Pepper over her, yet Kate never comes face-to-face with her. We know Lathan was stressed about getting back together with his family, yet when he walks through the door, he might as well have just walked over and hugged everyone as though he hadn't been gone for so long. No drama. Everything was wrapped up in a nice little package. Everyone, minus Kate and sometimes Lathan, is always happy. Lathan has his werewolf-related issues, but they're never addressed; he just repeatedly tells Pepper to drop it. I also wasn't a fan of the falling-in-love-so-fast aspect of the story.

I received this story as well as another one (already read it) from the publisher. It wasn't until after I purchased both audiobooks that I realized it was the same narrator who narrated both of the chosen audiobooks. So, again, while she was able to provide a variety of voices for all the characters, it was her random pausing that killed me. It detracts or takes me out of the story because I try to figure out why she would add in pauses between words. Given this was the second story I've listened to her narrate, I've determined when she's reading the name of a place, item, etc., is definitely a time when she'll add in the pauses. Either way, I could see her doing better with more practice, she just has to figure out a way to read the script without actually sounding like she's reading it.

Questions/Comments:

So there was a BDSM club in town? Or somewhere nearby, right? I didn't understand why that was even mentioned in the story.

Why wasn't there a bigger reaction when Lathan told Pepper that he loved her? She didn't really comment either, instead acted like it was something he said all the time to her.

I was surprised that given Kayleigh was Pepper's familiar that she didn't want to go along with Pepper and Lathan when they went to visit his family. Obviously, it would have been hard to bring her alone, but aren't a witch and her familiar like stuck at the hip typically?

There was the rule of no magic in front of mortals. So how did everyone in town know that Pepper and her family were witches?

Speaking of witches, I believe there were several times when someone comments about Pepper being a powerful witch. So why did she never do much magic? She used her powers to move some boxes into the cabin, start the fireplace (many times), and then to keep the salt-water tank (I think it was) working for the baby, injured seal. That was it.

There was a part prior to Pepper and Lathan eating dinner when Pepper (for whatever reason) put a certain amount of ice cubes in the microwave, but there was no explanation as to why.

Something that stood out to me was the fact the author went into detail regarding what the characters ate.

In the end, this was supposed to be a supernatural-related story based on the characters, yet there wasn't much supernatural anything going on.

  • NPCs

  • By: Drew Hayes
  • Narrated by: Roger Wayne
  • Length: 7 hrs and 50 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,708
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,176
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,167

What happens when the haggling is done and the shops are closed? When the quest has been given, the steeds saddled, and the adventurers are off to their next encounter? They keep the world running, the food cooked, and the horses shoed, yet what adventurer has ever spared a thought or concern for the Non-Player Characters? In the town of Maplebark, four such NPCs settle in for a night of actively ignoring the adventurers drinking in the tavern when things go quickly and fatally awry.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Enjoyable if you manage your expectations

  • By Miachi on 01-23-15

When NPCs swap sides, this is the glorious outcome

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-01-18

- Josh here

I stumbled upon this story after being introduced to the LitRPG genre by Robert Bevan and the Authors & Dragons team. This was another fun romp into the arena that is LitRPG. The folks at A&D and Team TW definitely gave me a winner by recommending this series.

I love journeying into the different interpretations where-by the role-playing realm and the real world are joined. I loved the interactions between the NPCs and the king, especially after their encounter with the various demons. It was interesting to watch how the actions of the NPCs impacted the real-world players.

Drew has a real winner in this series and I am glad to have had this series recommended to me. Roger did a fantastic job with narration and this really added to my enjoyment of the story. Can’t wait to move on to book 2!

  • Dark Grace

  • The Grace Series, Book 3
  • By: M. Lauryl Lewis
  • Narrated by: Kate Tyler
  • Length: 8 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 14
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 14
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 14

Now months into the zombie plague, a group of survivors are dealing with broken trusts, evolution of the living dead, and the horrors of the evil side of humanity. The group becomes separated and struggles to reunite. The infection is spreading. The death toll is tragically high.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Just love this book (series)

  • By Karynn Thomas on 12-20-17

It was okay.

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-28-18

Heads up, this is not a stand-alone book. Unfortunately, the author didn't provide much in the way of backstory either. My fault though. I did receive it for free through the publisher. I chose it because I love anything relating to zombies. Now I'm guessing the great ratings I see from other reviewers are from those who started the series at book one because I'm not really sure why this book as such great reviews in all honesty.

On that note, this was an okay listen. While there were a few zombies here and there, none of them really took center stage, so to speak. Most of the time it was like, oh, there goes a zombie, and that was it. I wasn't a fan of the love triangle at all. It seemed like the story was more about the relationship between Zoe, Gus, and Bogg and them moving from one location to another. I wasn't a fan of the writing style that much either. There was a lot of redundancy/repetition and sentences/phrases that didn't flow very smoothly, in my opinion. One such example: "He looked as red as the crabs we had boiled had turned." Or "The fresh air was refreshing." Stuff like that really sticks out like a sore thumb to me.

I'm not really sure if I liked any of the characters. I can say that I felt bad for Boggs though, he definitely deserved someone better even though in a prior book he hit Zoe (not sure why). I wouldn't describe Zoe, the female lead, as a strong female character. She came across as clueless (lacking a common sense) very emotional, especially in the whiny area and always seemed to need help with everything (usually from Gus or Boggs). And Gus...while he came across as a nice guy overall, he was sending out the weirdo vibes (the bad ones). I felt like he interacted with Zoe like she was a little kid, even though that's how I felt she acted. Their relationship was just questionable.

I liked the narrator; she provided a variety of voices and made it easy to understand which character was talking. Unfortunately, there were many times when it seemed like she moved away from the microphone or got closer. She did a lot of random pausing between words that I couldn't figure out as to why, and there were other times when I could hear her swallow her spit. Overall, she did a pretty good job.

Questions/Comments:

So the group is on an island, hiding away from the zombies. I found it questionable what their dinner consisted of the first night (the first meal at the beginning of the story). First, chili is made, and everyone eats it. Then someone decides it's time to make the fish they caught before they go bad. Why wouldn't they have just made that and save the chili for another night? Does anyone want dessert? Let's eat as much food as possible because we have a limited supply of food, right? Here's some canned fruit then. Who eats dessert when there's a zombie apocalypse going on around you? No one. It's all about food conservation. Yet, even though there's mention of having a limited food supply, the conservation part doesn't seem to matter.

Obviously, I should have read/listened to books 1 and 2 prior to listening to book 3. On that note, Zoe loves both Gus and Boggs it seems, although she's pregnant with Boggs' baby. I didn't understand how she could keep going back and forth between the two guys.

What year is this story taking place in? I ask because I question why Gus is so eager to find a hand-held heart monitor for the baby when it would probably be easier to find a stethoscope.

Before Zoe is introduced to Sadie and her friend (the little guy) that they later kill, she takes note that she can't tell if they're human. Yet, she takes note that they react in a human way when she and Bogg call to them, and they were talking, but she couldn't hear what they were saying.

So, Zoe and Emily are supposedly best friends. Yet, Zoe seems to have no problem sleeping (repeatedly) with Emily's man, Gus. Then when Emily is killed...personally, I felt Zoe overdid it with all her crying and wanting people to feel sorry for her.

Why did they bother to remove the dead/zombie dog from the vet office? I couldn't figure that part out.

With Gus' injuries, Nathan suggests they give him more meds every six hours. So he's given his medicine then they head over to the camping store for supplies. They meet the siblings that have been hanging out in the store, then head back to the vet office where the rest of the group is. When someone asks when Gus was last given his medicine, Nathan or Susan say it was six hours. How did they take eight hours in the camping store? Did they take a long nap and that part was just left out?

Zoe and Gus find a bag of Doritos. Yay! But, seriously...who in the world would wipe their cheesy Doritos fingers on the blanket they're sitting on? Why didn't she lick the cheese off? That was pure craziness!

Obviously, I've missed out on a lot of background information/storyline, but who would get pregnant during the zombie apocalypse?

How is Zoe surprised that Boggs is still mad at her? I mean seriously? You'd think she'd have some common sense and at least get her own room once arriving at the motel, but nope. She decides to sleep with Gus in his room. That will make things better.

How did the zombies know where they were? And if they knew that they were in the safe room, why didn't they hang around longer?

The final love/sex scene between Gus and Zoe was disgusting. Picture a twenty-something girl with a twice-her-age man. He did something medically-related in his prior life, or so I assume and wanted to help Zoe expel her breastmilk. Now, I know you can massage it out, but obviously, Gus wanted to make the situation weird at least for the reader. Now it's one thing to drink her breastmilk (barf), but it's whole 'nother story to masturbate her while doing so and then responding with "Good girl" right after she orgasms (gross). Sorry, but no.

  • Norse Mythology

  • By: Neil Gaiman
  • Narrated by: Neil Gaiman
  • Length: 6 hrs and 29 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 37,248
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 34,069
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 33,904

Neil Gaiman has long been inspired by ancient mythology in creating the fantastical realms of his fiction. Now he turns his attention back to the source, presenting a bravura rendition of the great northern tales. In Norse Mythology, Gaiman fashions primeval stories into a novelistic arc that begins with the genesis of the legendary nine worlds; delves into the exploits of the deities, dwarves, and giants; and culminates in Ragnarok, the twilight of the gods and the rebirth of a new time and people.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Comedy-Tragedy of Gods Giants Dwarfs & Monsters

  • By Jefferson on 02-24-17

I dedicate this review to Odin

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-25-18

Josh here

I found this book right around the time I finished the third book in the Circles in Hell series. Looking to keep on that kick, I pre-ordered this book and have had it sitting in my library waiting to be listened to. Having finished Gaiman’s American Gods book, I was quite excited to get to this one.

Having listened to it, I can honestly say that I wish I had listened to this sooner. What a ride! Gaiman did a wonderful job in bringing these stories to life and I found myself hooked from the very first chapter.

If you are looking for a wonderful journey into Norse Mythology, then look no further. This is a great collection of tales and really showcases key elements of why so many are drawn to the Norse Gods.

I gladly give this audiobook a 5/5. Gaiman’s narration was superb and really helped bring the story to life as only he could.