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andrew

Singapore, Singapore
  • 53
  • reviews
  • 40
  • helpful votes
  • 79
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  • The Last Days of August

  • By: Jon Ronson
  • Narrated by: Jon Ronson
  • Length: 3 hrs and 43 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 3,928
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,588
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 3,578

In December 2017 the famous porn star August Ames committed suicide in a park in the Conejo Valley. It happened a day after she’d been the victim of a pile-on, via Twitter, by fellow porn professionals - punishment for her tweeting something deemed homophobic. A month later, August’s husband, Kevin, connected with Jon Ronson to tell the story of how Twitter bullying killed his wife. What neither Kevin nor Ronson realized was that Ronson would soon hear rumors and secrets hinting at a very different story - something mysterious and unexpected and terrible.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Butterfly Effect meets Publicly Shamed

  • By Kingsley on 01-04-19

Jon Ronson, about anything. Anytime.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-08-19

longer than I expected the freebie to be, but that's a bonus. It is all, as usual, well portrayed, researched (as much as I can tell from mere listening), and it's captivating to follow the story.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Consuming Fire

  • The Interdependency, Book 2
  • By: John Scalzi
  • Narrated by: Wil Wheaton
  • Length: 8 hrs and 19 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,452
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,161
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,142

The Interdependency, humanity’s interstellar empire, is on the verge of collapse. The Flow, the extra-dimensional conduit that makes travel between the stars possible, is disappearing, leaving entire star systems stranded. When it goes, human civilization may go with it - unless desperate measures can be taken. Emperox Grayland II, the leader of the Interdependency, is ready to take those measures to help ensure the survival of billions. But nothing is ever that easy.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Scalzi and Wheaton or the new dynamic duo?

  • By Donald Arquilla on 10-17-18

great follow-up

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-21-18

as good as the first book. A well plotted and thought through story that paves way for more without being obvious where the story will go (other than the broad outline).

  • Zero Hour

  • Expeditionary Force, Book 5
  • By: Craig Alanson
  • Narrated by: R. C. Bray
  • Length: 17 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 21,128
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 19,900
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 19,800

United Nations Special Operations Command sent an elite expeditionary force of soldiers and pilots out on a simple recon mission, and somehow along the way they sparked an alien civil war. Now the not-at-all-merry band of pirates is in desperate trouble, again. Their stolen alien starship is falling apart, thousands of light years from home. The ancient alien AI they nicknamed Skippy is apparently dead, and even if they can by some miracle revive him, he might never be the same.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Monkeys kick A**, but......

  • By Beachcombers on 02-14-18

continuously great

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-10-18

just as great as the previous books in the series; still hilariously entertaining, but clearly the story is coming to a conclusion, a finale.

  • The Other Wife

  • By: Michael Robotham
  • Narrated by: Sean Barrett
  • Length: 10 hrs and 33 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 306
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 284
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 283

 

Childhood sweethearts William and Mary have been married for 60 years. William is a celebrated surgeon, Mary a devoted wife. Both have a strong sense of right and wrong. This is what their son, Joe O'Loughlin, has always believed. But when Joe is summoned to the hospital with news that his father has been brutally attacked, his world is turned upside down. Who is the strange woman crying at William's bedside, covered in his blood - a friend, a mistress, a fantasist or a killer? 

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Fantastic Installment To The Series

  • By Lia on 06-28-18

not good enough

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-04-18

I've listened to many Robotham's books, but this one was too dry, uninteresting, with the usual red herrings. the end was of course unpredictable but I also didn't care at that point (I skipped a few charters toward the end). those were the obligatory twists.
I didn't find the story nor the characters interesting, and as a frequent reader of the author's book, I found it annoying that the professor, at the beginning of the book, acted like a child despite his previous experiences and cases. also, his disease seems to be conveniently managed in this case while in other books it seemed much worse.
It was too much of a cookie cutter book. I wouldn't recommend it.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • We Are Legion (We Are Bob)

  • Bobiverse, Book 1
  • By: Dennis E. Taylor
  • Narrated by: Ray Porter
  • Length: 9 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 64,908
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 60,920
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 60,793

Bob Johansson has just sold his software company and is looking forward to a life of leisure. There are places to go, books to read, and movies to watch. So it's a little unfair when he gets himself killed crossing the street. Bob wakes up a century later to find that corpsicles have been declared to be without rights, and he is now the property of the state. He has been uploaded into computer hardware and is slated to be the controlling AI in an interstellar probe looking for habitable planets.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Ignore the Publisher's Summary! This is Amazing!

  • By PW on 04-12-17

from the high to low

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-10-18

The book starts great, and I was hooked immediately. however, it becomes no more than a typical sci-fi/star trek derivative by the half mark. By the end, it's all about a prehistoric tale that I've heard a thousand times in various renderings. there's nothing new there. At least it is somewhat funny so I managed to finish the book.
it felt like the author had a great idea but didn't know what to do with it after the initial phase and turned the story of AI character into a human character. there's almost nothing in the second half to indicate that the characters Bob (all of them) are AI and simulated. Even the story comes back to Earth, like so many others, and the inhabitants of the other planet, deltans, are nothing else than "Flintstones".
as I said earlier, at least it's funny and entertaining but that got me only so far.
I won't continue with the series as it's not (or doesn't seem at this point) any different from many stories I have already read (or seen).

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • A Game of Thrones

  • Book 1 of A Song of Ice and Fire
  • By: George R. R. Martin
  • Narrated by: Roy Dotrice
  • Length: 33 hrs and 45 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,226
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,096
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,105

The complete, unabridged audiobook of A Game of Thrones. HBO’s hit series A Game of Thrones is based on George R. R. Martin’s internationally best-selling series A Song of Ice and Fire, the greatest fantasy epic of the modern age. A Game of Thrones is the first volume in the series. Summers span decades. Winter can last a lifetime. And the struggle for the Iron Throne has begun.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Great story and performance.

  • By Darrell on 11-19-12

never ending description of things to come

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-07-18

I agree with those who didn't like the book for its never ending description of needless characters, details and scenes. Theres no real story here, just an outline, and many characters die quickly so a 30min description of their skills, clothes and life isn't necessary.
I wasn't so put off by the narrator but, yes, some of his voice rendering isn't necessary or is off the mark.
I finished the audio book with gritted teeth and skipped ahead multiple times (only to find myself almost not advancing in the story; there's so much more description than there's a story).
the outline of the "great story" isn't interesting enough to me to continue with another book. especially when each audiobook is 30-40 hours long. ouch.
I don't think I'd enjoy a printed version of the book either. the whole story isn't interesting to me, and I don't appreciate the writing style.

  • The Coming Storm

  • By: Michael Lewis
  • Narrated by: Michael Lewis
  • Length: 2 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16,945
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 15,397
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 15,357

Tornadoes, cyclones, tsunamis… Weather can be deadly – especially when it strikes without warning. Millions of Americans could soon find themselves at the mercy of violent weather if the public data behind lifesaving storm alerts gets privatized for personal gain. In his first Audible Original feature, New York Times best-selling author and journalist Michael Lewis delivers hard-hitting research on not-so-random weather data – and how Washington plans to release it. 

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Why you shouldn't ignore the weather forecast

  • By Elisabeth Carey on 09-10-18

instant classic :-)

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-02-18

well written, well researched (as far as I can tell), and well performed, too. And it was for free :-).
hoping it's a precursor to an actual book (i.e. a long version of the topic).

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Righteous Mind

  • Why Good People Are Divided by Politics and Religion
  • By: Jonathan Haidt
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Haidt
  • Length: 11 hrs and 1 min
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,335
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,618
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,544

In The Righteous Mind, social psychologist Jonathan Haidt explores the origins of our divisions and points the way forward to mutual understanding. His starting point is moral intuition - the nearly instantaneous perceptions we all have about other people and the things they do. These intuitions feel like self-evident truths, making us righteously certain that those who see things differently are wrong. Haidt shows us how these intuitions differ across cultures, including the cultures of the political left and right.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • This should give you pause.

  • By Floyd Clark on 10-26-15

well laid out, reasonable

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-10-18

it's a well designed story line, with persuasive arguments and evidence. it may not be for everyone, but it fulfills its promise described in synopsis. The title and synopsis might be a bit off-putting to some, and I found it a bit "misleading" because the content is much more than just politics, and righteousness.
AND there's the great narration by the author by himself! I appreciated the description of pictures, charts that one cannot see while listening to the audio book (as opposed to seeing the images on a page of a physical copy). well done!

  • Algorithms to Live By

  • The Computer Science of Human Decisions
  • By: Brian Christian, Tom Griffiths
  • Narrated by: Brian Christian
  • Length: 11 hrs and 50 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,305
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,952
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,878

All our lives are constrained by limited space and time, limits that give rise to a particular set of problems. What should we do, or leave undone, in a day or a lifetime? How much messiness should we accept? What balance of new activities and familiar favorites is the most fulfilling? These may seem like uniquely human quandaries, but they are not: computers, too, face the same constraints, so computer scientists have been grappling with their version of such problems for decades.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Not Just Computer Science

  • By M on 10-10-16

captivating and well explained

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-02-18

some of the topics I've encountered before but here our was much better explained with real life examples. a great book.

  • The Collapsing Empire

  • The Interdependency, Book 1
  • By: John Scalzi
  • Narrated by: Wil Wheaton
  • Length: 9 hrs and 24 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 13,560
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12,729
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12,689

Our universe is ruled by physics, and faster-than-light travel is not possible - until the discovery of The Flow, an extradimensional field we can access at certain points in space-time that transports us to other worlds, around other stars. Humanity flows away from Earth, into space, and in time forgets our home world and creates a new empire, the Interdependency, whose ethos requires that no one human outpost can survive without the others. It's a hedge against interstellar war - and a system of control for the rulers of the empire.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Definitely not my favorite scalzi

  • By pat on 03-25-17

great story

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-29-18

I loved the the plot line and enjoyed the performance but some of the finer details are quite laughable;'for example, hundreds of year from now during the intergalactic travel era, the state of AI is at the level it was in 2015. All of this is typical of Scalzi's writing, the good and the bad. However, the overall experience is good, and it's entertaining so it's always worth reading.