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Lizzie Askew

  • 77
  • reviews
  • 219
  • helpful votes
  • 99
  • ratings
  • White Fang

  • By: Jack London
  • Narrated by: Matthew Steward
  • Length: 7 hrs and 46 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 15
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 14
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 13

Five wolf pups are born, but only one survives. The lone pup and its mother must fend for themselves when the pup's father is killed by a lynx. Later, the pair is discovered by Native Americans. Grey Beaver, who recognizes the she-wolf as his late brother's wolfdog, adopts the pup and names him 'White Fang.' Targeted by the other pups in the Native American camp before being sold to a dog fighter, White Fang grows to be fierce, distrustful, and morose.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Incredible book, the best version I've found

  • By Lizzie Askew on 11-29-17

Incredible book, the best version I've found

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-29-17

I sampled all of the many different narrations of this book available on Audible, and i thought that this one was the best. I am so glad i bought it, because what a gorgeous, gorgeous book. I saw the movie when i was a kid. They played it a lot on the Disney channel, but the movie was a whole different thing. This is not a story about a boy as the movie was, but about a wolf, and about the harshness of his life and of the wild, and... well i won't ruin it for you. Just know that the language of the prose is beautiful and exact, and so vital that it makes this novel seem too short. Definitely a credit well spent.

  • Nine Princes in Amber

  • The Chronicles of Amber, Book 1
  • By: Roger Zelazny
  • Narrated by: Alessandro Juliani
  • Length: 5 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 3,553
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,243
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 3,266

Amber is the one real world, of which all others including our own Earth are but Shadows. Amber burns in Corwin's blood. Exiled on Shadow Earth for centuries, the prince is about to return to Amber to make a mad and desperate rush upon the throne.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great book, lame deal!

  • By Robert on 08-13-12

So plotty and fast-paced that it stumbles--

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-08-17

Any additional comments?

When I first started reading Nine Princes, I was very excited about it. I had pegged it for a "swords n sorcery" book based on the summary, so I'd passed it up before. But come to find out, this is more like a portal fantasy with a gritty, noir tone.

From the beginning I knew I liked Roger Zelazny. He writes the main guy's personality very convincingly. He keeps things moving at all times, but he also manages to get some poignant language and ideas into things pretty regularly. Most of all, he writes a pretty interesting plot. I thought that, with all this going on, Nine Princes couldn't possibly go wrong. But then, about 70% through, I lost interest.

The reason why is that, when Zelazny mentions or suggests the passage of time, it tends to be drowned out by the events of his scenes. All that plotty quickness overwhelmed my ability to keep up with the logical chain of events. The overall effect of this was that eventually I began to feel like the characters weren't actually going anywhere, but were just doing things all in the same place with no breaks in between the action and events, like the story was some kind of long fever dream.

The other issue I had with Nine Princes was actually one of the things I liked most about it at first. The noir tone got a little thick. Or maybe, it was just the natural imperiousness of the main character (who had been royalty in a previous life). Perhaps it was a combo of the two, but it began to eat at me a little bit because it was so macho. That kind of thing is more noticeable to me than it used to be, as literature of all types has become more observant of humanity as a whole these days, rather than just of one type of person as it once tended to be. Couple that with a pace that doesn't keep you "with it", and I just decided to find something else.

I would suggest you give this book a try, though, if you enjoy a sharp, modern fantasy. You might not have the same opinion of it as I did, and I wouldn't want anyone to miss out on a good book.

  • The Dispatcher

  • By: John Scalzi
  • Narrated by: Zachary Quinto
  • Length: 2 hrs and 19 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 21,540
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 20,040
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 19,982

Zachary Quinto - best known for his role as the Nimoy-approved Spock in the recent Star Trek reboot and the menacing, power-stealing serial killer, Sylar, in Heroes - brings his well-earned sci-fi credentials and simmering intensity to this audio-exclusive novella from master storyteller John Scalzi. One day, not long from now, it becomes almost impossible to murder anyone - 999 times out of a thousand, anyone who is intentionally killed comes back. How? We don't know.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Good Grief This Was Good

  • By Matthew on 11-09-16

Well, that was... different

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-08-17

I think about 75% of this story is dialogue and I don't think I'm a fan of that approach. That could be because the premise was so whacky that the main character had to spend the first half of the book just walking around explaining it to people to make it seem more plausible. That made the story feel overstuffed to me. Found myself feeling glad that it was so short, although I bet it would have been a better, more enjoyable experience if it were longer, just to leave some room for things to unfold a bit more naturally. It could have been more fun, or stylish, or paced out, or something, I don't know. This seems like the kind of thing he might have done just to get a deadline behind him. Has its cool parts, but mostly seems uninspired.

  • Hell Divers

  • The Hell Divers Series, Book 1
  • By: Nicholas Sansbury Smith
  • Narrated by: R. C. Bray
  • Length: 10 hrs and 11 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 14,200
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 13,325
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 13,286

More than two centuries after World War III poisoned the planet, the final bastion of humanity lives on massive airships circling the globe in search of a habitable area to call home. Aging and outdated, most of the ships plummeted back to Earth long ago. The only thing keeping the two surviving lifeboats in the sky are Hell Divers - men and women who risk their lives by diving to the surface to scavenge for parts the ships desperately need.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I usually don't read my SciFi however....!!

  • By Michalena on 10-06-17

The premise had potential...

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-24-16

Any additional comments?

I would give a one star rather than two if that kind of thing didn't always feel like a bit of an exaggeration. Even bad books can be good. If you really like grim, "space soldier" types of stories, this might appeal to you. But for me it was just a really cool idea that seemed to end up wading into marketable norms. It was a wonderful setup, followed by a big let-down. If I hadn't gotten my hopes up for a good story I probably wouldn't have been this disappointed. It's filled with pages of life or death situations and catastrophe, all jammed together in succession from the very start. Just has this studied grimness to it that didn't ever let up and ended up losing my interest after a while. Not a lot of "lateral movement" in the plot. I loved the idea of the divers and the ships and stuff, and the dives through the fried skies were really cool, but once you get down to the damaged Earth, things just start to get a little cliche...a little predictable and, thus, unbelievable. That's when I started to ask myself if the whole "sky divers with helium balloons" thing made any sense at all. The direction things began to take felt like something an author might settle for if he's out of ideas, or just so lazy that he appropriates things from other sources in a passionless way. That's my take anyway. You may love it, you never know. Seems like a certain niche of readers have enjoyed it a great deal. At any rate, the voice actor was really well suited to this book.

2 of 7 people found this review helpful

  • Cold Moon over Babylon

  • Valancourt 20th Century Classics
  • By: Michael McDowell
  • Narrated by: Scott Brick
  • Length: 9 hrs and 47 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 975
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 901
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 902

Welcome to Babylon, a typical sleepy Alabama small town, where years earlier the Larkin family suffered a terrible tragedy. Now they are about to endure another: 14-year-old Margaret Larkin will be robbed of her innocence and her life by a killer who is beyond the reach of the law. But something strange is happening in Babylon: traffic lights flash an eerie blue, a ghostly hand slithers from the drain of a kitchen sink, graves erupt from the local cemetery in an implacable march of terror.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Best audible listen to date...

  • By Bree Salyer on 06-27-16

This is an incredible book

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-23-16

Any additional comments?

These characters are so original and interesting, they really made the book. And this guy can turn a lovely phrase too. The style is so acerbic, yet beautiful. If you're looking for something that moves more quickly than a ponderous Steven King horror, but still gives you depth and substantial creepiness, go for this one. It'll pull you in.

4 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • On the Night of the Seventh Moon

  • By: Victoria Holt
  • Narrated by: Virginia Leishman
  • Length: 11 hrs and 36 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 136
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 123
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 124

In this entrancing novel, set in late 1800s Europe, a beautiful English schoolgirl participates in an ancient celebration, only to discover she no longer knows the difference between truth and myth. As shadows lengthen, 17-year-old Helena Trant and her classmates must finish their picnic in the Black Forest. Tonight young men will be out to honor Loke, the god of mischief, with drinking and pranks - no woman will be safe. As Helena walks through the misty woods, she loses her friends, but her fear turns to joy....

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • A classic ....

  • By genia on 12-22-11

I don't know if I can listen anymore

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-03-16

Any additional comments?

I'm only two hours in, and the tone is so cheerful, and the narrative is so summarized that I'm not getting the drama one wants from a modern gothic. It's just not hitting my switches like I thought it might. There's also this repeated use of the word "vivid" and the done-to-death, eighteenth century tropes, like the sham marriage...I haven't even found out if it's a sham yet but I think I can see it coming from a mile away. Tiresome. I hate eighteenth century literature and this book seems to want to emulate it. If you're into that sort of reading, get it.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, Book 4

  • By: J.K. Rowling
  • Narrated by: Jim Dale
  • Length: 21 hrs and 12 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 39,625
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 36,344
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 36,266

The Triwizard Tournament is to be held at Hogwarts. Only wizards who are over seventeen are allowed to enter - but that doesn't stop Harry dreaming that he will win the competition. Then at Hallowe'en, when the Goblet of Fire makes its selection, Harry is amazed to find his name is one of those that the magical cup picks out. He will face death-defying tasks, dragons, and dark wizards, but with the help of his best friends, Ron and Hermione, he might just make it through - alive!

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The Best of a Brilliant Series

  • By Gretchen SLP on 11-21-15

Not my favorite narrator

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-30-16

Any additional comments?

I could really picture hearing this narrator reading a headline on the evening news, "This is BBC." He's really not bad, his performance was pretty strong relatively to a lot of the readers you hear on here. He's just a little...blunt, I guess, and I don't like the song-song way he seems too read the lines of most females in the story, including Hermione. As far as the story is concerned, it's not as obviously intended for children as the first book so I enjoyed it a lot more. Pretty genius, making the reading level of your books grow up with their readers. Rowling really does make this a story that shows a sense of realism about the world through fantasy. She's a strong writer and I really appreciated and enjoyed this one. It's nice and long, it's subtlely funny in that British way, and it doesn't seem to have any bad, boring, or incoherent parts at all. Well done!

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Fireman

  • A Novel
  • By: Joe Hill
  • Narrated by: Kate Mulgrew
  • Length: 22 hrs and 19 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,939
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,560
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 5,543

No one knows exactly when it began or where it originated. A terrifying new plague is spreading like wildfire across the country, striking cities one by one: Boston, Detroit, Seattle. The doctors call it Draco Incendia Trychophyton. To everyone else it's Dragonscale, a highly contagious, deadly spore that marks its hosts with beautiful black and gold marks across their bodies - before causing them to burst into flames. Millions are infected; blazes erupt everywhere. There is no antidote. No one is safe.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • A bit disappointed

  • By NCBluebonnet on 06-06-18

How could this book be more awesome?

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-30-16

Any additional comments?

I don't know! I really don't know. However, I can already hear the cries of "libral bias!" and honestly, who cares? The point being made is more important, and more universal than two measly parties supposedly representing the interests of over 300 million people. Seriously, get over it for five minutes and try to enjoy the story.Speaking of which, this story is so timely! He must have written it pretty quickly to get it out into the world still filled with very current events, but it by no means feels like a rush job. It makes a social point, almost too heavily but not quite. There's a really smooth balance between the socially conscious and the purely bad*ss fun stuff, and that stuff really is super cool. On top of all that, Joe Hills's writing always has such a natural and conversational quality about it. It never bores me and always carries me through his stories, even when they go through chapters of thematic point-making. The guy can write, y'all. Can't wait to watch him grow the way his father has.

0 of 8 people found this review helpful

  • Sunshine

  • By: Robin McKinley
  • Narrated by: Laural Merlington
  • Length: 15 hrs and 23 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,033
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 754
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 763

There are places in the world where darkness rules, where it's unwise to walk. Sunshine knew that. But there hadn't been any trouble out at the lake for years, and she needed a place to be alone for a while. Unfortunately, she wasn't alone. She never heard them coming. Of course you don't, when they're vampires.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • An absolutely riveting, addictive tale

  • By Amazon Customer on 12-30-08

Must be better if read...

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-11-16

Any additional comments?

It's great that Neil Gaiman enjoyed this book in his, no doubt, gorgeous and luxurious bathtub, but I'm having trouble getting through it. I'm not sure if the narration is wholly responsible for that or only 80%. I always have a problem with narration that misses emotional cues, and wherein simple, common words are twisted into odd mispronounciations (the name Amiel, probably short for Amelia, is pronounced "Ayy-Meal," and Were, short for werewolf, is pronounced "we're," over and over again). This narrator commits these sins regularly, and on top of it all, she reads in a plucky, cutesy sort of way that quickly blurs into high pitched yammering. Her voices for male vampires, and they are all male so far, are also deeply affected and grating. Also, I'm starting to call this book "Robin explains it all," because the main character explaining everything about the intricacies of her world makes up the vast majority of things. No half way significant amount of plot gets away from the author without first getting filled up with irrelevant explanations like a jelly doughnut. It's all laid out in kind of a gradually enlightening way, but my mind keeps wandering away when the main character starts expounding on nearly irrelevant little details, like, the origins and growth habits of the type of tree that the best stakes are made from (this part explained just when a vampire was about to get staked...What action scene? Let's talk about trees!) I'm sensing that this style and pacing could actually be cool, if I were reading it off the page myself and thus could give it proper emphasis in my mind. I really recommend you buy the text.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Half Way Home

  • By: Hugh Howey
  • Narrated by: Max Miller
  • Length: 6 hrs and 10 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 463
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 417
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 416

Less than 60 kids awaken on a distant planet. The colony ship they arrived on is aflame. The rest of their contingent is dead. They've only received half their training, and they are being asked to conquer an entire planet. Before they can, however, they must first survive each other.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • My Favorite Hugh Howey

  • By Michale on 06-07-14

Not great, but it probably helped the author learn

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-10-16

Seems like maybe Howey was still working his writerly kinks out with this one. It starts with an interesting premise, but it's clumsy when taken as a whole. The world was really fun to picture and imagine, I wish the story had had more atmospheric detail. I could have lingered in those treetops more. Still, all along it was like I could feel the author forcing all the parts of the story together, and shoving in theme hardest of all.