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  • 7
  • reviews
  • 12
  • helpful votes
  • 10
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  • Gotham

  • A History of New York City to 1898
  • By: Edwin G. Burrows, Mike Wallace
  • Narrated by: Victor Bevine
  • Length: 67 hrs and 25 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 42
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 36
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 38

In Gotham, Edwin G. Burrows and Mike Wallace have produced a monumental work of history, one that ranges from the Indian tribes that settled in and around the island of Manna-hata, to the consolidation of the five boroughs into Greater New York in 1898. It is an epic narrative, a story as vast and as varied as the city it chronicles, and it underscores that the history of New York is the story of our nation. The events and people who crowd this audiobook guarantee that this is no mere local history. It is in fact a portrait of the heart and soul of America....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • THANK YOU!!!!!

  • By Amazon Customer on 09-29-18

Disappointing

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-05-18

The Island at the Top of the World did it much better in every way

0 of 7 people found this review helpful

  • Bad Blood

  • Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup
  • By: John Carreyrou
  • Narrated by: Will Damron
  • Length: 11 hrs and 37 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 15,778
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 14,304
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 14,286

In 2014, Theranos founder and CEO Elizabeth Holmes was widely seen as the female Steve Jobs: a brilliant Stanford dropout whose startup "unicorn" promised to revolutionize the medical industry with a machine that would make blood testing significantly faster and easier. Backed by investors such as Larry Ellison and Tim Draper, Theranos sold shares in a fundraising round that valued the company at more than $9 billion, putting Holmes' worth at an estimated $4.7 billion. There was just one problem: The technology didn't work.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Extreme retaliation against former employees

  • By Eugene on 05-29-18

Pretty much a surface view

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-11-18

I didn't learn any more than I dod reading newspaper accounts of this story. No real insights into anyone, even the primary characters. I was disappointed that this did not explore the two protagonists in more detail. I also felt the story ended to quickly as there is no update to occurrences after the information that was covered in the initial story. Overall, I was disappointed in this book.

  • Lies My Teacher Told Me

  • Everything Your American History Textbook Got Wrong
  • By: James W. Loewen
  • Narrated by: Brian Keeler
  • Length: 14 hrs and 26 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,255
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1,650
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,659

This national best seller is an entertaining, informative, and sometimes shocking expose of the way history is taught to American students. Lies My Teacher Told Me won the American Book Award and the Oliver Cromwell Cox Award for Distinguished Anti-Racist Scholarship.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Historical Fiction Stranger Than Truth

  • By Dubi on 01-17-15

Sad but necessary

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-08-18

It is painful each time another national fraud is revealed and its damages itemized like drops of water torture. However, it is the sort of cleansing that is needed to disabuse white privilege of its absurd notions of "manifest destiny." rather it is a corrupt, degenerate series of lies and state supported propaganda that has caused so many well meaning people to leave school with this notion that they are almost magically imbued with pure,unblemished success throughout the world due to their righteousness. I wonder differences possible were there an even playing field.

So much pain and death and turmoil caused by the need to maintain white privilege that it has sadly corrupted the victims and the perpetrators. What a powerful nation this truly would be. Now we face the prospect of generations having to pass before we can hope to reach a realistic interaction. I believe, however, it can never happen because the evil of racism seems to thrive in this country. So rich, so powerful, yet so craven and petty. The United States is no symbol of anything but greed and jealousy. There are so many good people who seek to overcome this but they can never overcome because they cannot live long enough.

  • Twentieth-Century Boy

  • Notebooks of the Seventies
  • By: Duncan Hannah
  • Narrated by: Duncan Hannah
  • Length: 14 hrs and 10 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 6
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 6
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 6

Celebrated painter Duncan Hannah arrived in New York City from Minneapolis in the early 1970s as an art student hungry for experience, game for almost anything, and with a prodigious taste for drugs, girls, alcohol, movies, rock and roll, books, parties, and everything else the city had to offer. Taken directly from the notebooks Hannah kept throughout the decade, Twentieth-Century Boy is a fascinating, sometimes lurid, and incredibly entertaining report from a now almost mythical time and place.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Childish drivel in search of an editor

  • By MidWest Frequent Buyer on 05-26-18

Childish drivel in search of an editor

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-26-18

I am amazed this silly pointless nonsense was published. From the annoying sound effects delivered by the narrator/author to the hopeless memories of dry humping teen angst I groaned my way through as much of Mr. Hannah's tedium as I could stomach. So much of what is written here are observations and therefore are others stolen memories.

I was living in New York City at the same time Mr Hannah says he was. I experienced and saw much more interesting and exciting events. I can't name drop as much as this author as I have more respect for the privacy of people I associated with. But of course, without the names dropped there would be no book.

Don't waste your credits. Read books by those who had the courage to actually do something interesting.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Eye of the Beholder

  • The Almost Perfect Murder of Anchorwoman Diane Newton King
  • By: Lowell Cauffiel
  • Narrated by: Luke Daniels
  • Length: 19 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 40
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 35
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 36

Battle Creek, Michigan, is famous as the birthplace of breakfast cereal, and the nearby suburb of Marshall is as wholesome as shredded wheat. On a frigid night in February of 1991, newscaster Diane Newton King was stepping out of her car, her children strapped into the backseat, when a sniper's bullet cut her down. The police assumed that the killer was her stalker - a crazed fan who had been terrorizing King for weeks. But as their investigation ground to a standstill, the police turned to another suspect - one much closer to home.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Listening to the orator change his voice based

  • By Amazon Customer on 03-22-17

This book is beyond boring

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-20-17

What disappointed you about Eye of the Beholder?

Someone called this gripping...I wanted to grip the author's neck and beg him to stop writing. Don't waste your time and money on this crap. The newspaper article was likely more compelling. Add that to the terribly arranged story. The boring people involved...the people the made up this story could have been replaced by potted palms.

What do you think your next listen will be?

Something better I sincerely hope

What didn’t you like about Luke Daniels’s performance?

It was narrated by a guy who sounded like an undertaker on sedatives.If he didn't like the book he should not have narrated it

If you could play editor, what scene or scenes would you have cut from Eye of the Beholder?

Everything after the title

Any additional comments?

I have wasted enough time on this.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Two Graves

  • By: Douglas Preston, Lincoln Child
  • Narrated by: Rene Auberjonois
  • Length: 16 hrs and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,498
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,111
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,108

After his wife, Helen, is brazenly abducted before his eyes, Special Agent Pendergast furiously pursues the kidnappers, chasing them across the country and into Mexico. But then, things go terribly, tragically wrong; the kidnappers escape; and a shattered Pendergast retreats to his New York apartment and shuts out the world. But when a string of bizarre murders erupts across several Manhattan hotels, NYPD Lieutenant D'Agosta asks his friend Pendergast for help.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Whiplash from the emotional rollercaster

  • By GH on 12-13-12

I am shocked any Pendergast fans liked this book

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-25-12

This book wasn’t for you, but who do you think might enjoy it more?

Having read or listened to all of the Pendergast books I was finally completely disappointed in their newest offering, Two Graves. I have been concerned about the direction of the books for a while. I was troubled by the Diogenes story line and his interaction with Constance, largely because these characters were less than essential to the Pendergast theme. They were peripheral characters in different storylines that were afforded more than a useful share of the books.

I was troubled by the Stradivari storyline because it seemed an interminable load of back story serving no useful purpose again. I feel the authors have a need to demonstrate that they are worldly travelers deeply knowledgeable about the slightest nuance in broad swaths of lore. It sometimes becomes a bit of self-aggrandizement at the expense of the story.

I was concerned at the lack of real content in Cold Vengeance. The back and forth with Esterhazy was tedious and reminiscent of Keystone Kops. Important plot revelations equaled about a chapter only.

Which brings us to Two Graves. I was already troubled at the notion of the Nazis. Why reboot this tired tired canard. Never mind the nod to Captain America in the opening…as Pendergast goes super hero. The deductive reasoning that leads to impossible clues reminiscent of Sherlock Holmes. The shocking mass killer reminiscent of Jack the ripper who we are to believe is the long lost progeny of a central character. And last but not least is the truly monumentally pointless exploration of the Constance story.

It seems the authors are truly finally lost or bereft of ideas and are throwing characters at the proverbial mud wall in hope of some success. I suggest a return to what made Pendergast compelling and different. Not a lot of heavy muddy pointless personal baggage. Rather a Kolchak-like penchant for uncovering strange occult appearing occurrences that are inevitably proven to be, not the work of ghosts and demons, but the work of bad people. He does not need a consistent buddy. D’agosta would be ok but the Laura Hayward character is not really useful. Also not useful is the whole girl from Kansas storyline. C’mon guys…come up with some new ideas or end the series honorably.

I won’t be buying another Pendergast book unless there is a change for the better. I stopped reading Two Graves halfway through. I may finish the book at some point but I needed to look away from this unfortunate disappointment.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

Rubicon audiobook cover art
  • Rubicon

  • The Triumph and Tragedy of the Roman Republic
  • By: Tom Holland
  • Narrated by: Steven Crossley
  • Length: 15 hrs and 36 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,133
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,042
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,040

The Roman Republic was the most remarkable state in history. What began as a small community of peasants camped among marshes and hills ended up ruling the known world. Rubicon paints a vivid portrait of the Republic at the climax of its greatness - the same greatness which would herald the catastrophe of its fall. It is a story of incomparable drama.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Connects the Dots and Fills In the Gaps

  • By Emily on 01-28-12

Pointless snide allusions with no substance

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-09-12

Would you try another book from Tom Holland and/or Steven Crossley?

No. This book was a hash job FULL of gossip from various sources. There is no reason to believe any of it. The author and publisher had to know this was bad literature but they put it out anyway. The phrase Junk Food comes readily to mind...

Would you ever listen to anything by Tom Holland again?

No. In his narration of this book Steven Crossley sounded like an English gadabout at a mid 19th century dinner party trying to serve up something scintillating and shocking. Neither of which was realized. Rather this is gossip stew done rather better by Suetonius in his tome about the 12 Caesars.

How could the performance have been better?

Had it been based on quality material perhaps it would have made the narration rise to the task.

You didn’t love this book... but did it have any redeeming qualities?

It ended...

Any additional comments?

I am disappointed that this was made available. I am even more shocked at all the positive reviews. This teaches me to never base my selection on a review anymore.

7 of 31 people found this review helpful